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Graduate Department of English


Donna Woodford-Gormley, Department Chair
Douglas Hall, Room DH 139
505-454-3253
FAX: 505-454-3414
E-mail: dwoodford@nmhu.edu


 


Mission of the Department of English

The Department of English M.A. program offers advanced instruction in literature, linguistics, creative writing, and composition. It is designed to provide a strong foundation in advanced research methods for the study of English; a thorough background in the history and development of the English language; current theories in linguistics, literary criticism, and writing; and a variety of electives in the three emphasis areas.

 

The graduate program serves regional secondary school teachers, prospective community college teachers, students who plan to enter PhD programs and students who seek stronger credentials in English for careers in journalism, publication, and professional writing. Each year, graduate assistantships are awarded competitively to full-time students. Along with tutoring in the Writing Center, graduate assistants undertake extensive teacher training in composition and gain considerable experience as composition instructors. 

 


Faculty

  • Helen Blythe, Ph.D. 
  • Peter Buchanan, Ph.D. 
  • Lauren Fath, Ph.D. 
  • Juan Gallegos, Ph.D. 
  • Brandon Kempner, Ph.D. 
  • Jason McIntosh, Ph.D. 
  • Tyler Mills, Ph.D. 
  • Eddie Tafoya, Ph.D. 
  • Benjamin Villarreal 
  • Donna Woodford-Gormley, Ph.D. 

Resources and Facilities

The Department of English is located in Douglas Hall, which houses classrooms, the Writing Center, the Language Learning Center, and offices for faculty and graduate assistants in the humanities. 

The Department of English program provides the services of the Writing Center to students in all university courses as well as in English composition courses. The facility offers individual tutoring and small group work. Teaching assistants in the English M.A. program begin learning tutoring pedagogy while working at the Writing Center during their first semester. 

The English program houses The New Mexico Review, a literary journal that publishes poetry, fiction, and essays. Graduate students earn practicum credit for their work in the production of the journal. The M.A. English program also sponsors a chapter of the international English honor society, Sigma Tau Delta. 


Master of Arts in English (MA)

Students should consult with the director of graduate studies in English prior to registration each term for advisement. During the first meeting, the director and student will develop a long-term plan for completing the program. 

Required Core:

ENGL 502 Literary Theory (3) 

ENGL 541 History of the English Language (3) 

ENGL 601 Research Methods in English (3) 

Students choose one of the following: 

ENGL 699 Thesis (6) OR 

ENGL 696 Publishable Papers (3) AND 

Electives (3)* 

*Approved electives selected in consultation with adviser 
Required course for teaching assistants:

ENGL 515 Methods of Tutoring & Teaching Writing (3)* 

Electives: 9 – 12 credit hours

Students take nine hours in their concentration area and electives from any of the concentrations. Please note that for creative writing students, three of their nine credits must be in ENGL 671. Electives may also include other faculty-approved courses. *Students approved for ENGL 515 Methods of Tutoring & Teaching Writing take nine credit hours of electives instead of 12 credit hours.

Core & Electives Total: 27 credit hours 

Concentration in Literature

Choose three courses from the following: 

ENGL 511 Major American Writers (3) 

ENGL 512 Major British Writers (3) 

ENGL 514 Literary Realism (3) 

ENGL 521 Chaucer (3) 

ENGL 522 Shakespeare (3) 

ENGL 523 Milton (3) 

ENGL 535 Selected Topics in English (3) 

ENGL 5/650 Seminar in English (1-4) 

ENGL 582 Literature of the Southwest (3) 

ENGL 591 Arthurian Literature (3) 

ENGL 610 Major American Poets (3) 

ENGL 636 Varieties of Romanticism (3) 

ENGL 641 History of Popular Literature (3) 

Concentration Total: 9 credit hours 

Core & Electives Total: 27 credit hours 

Program Total: 36 credit hours 


Concentration in Language, Rhetoric and Composition

Choose three courses from the following:
MART 518 Print of Multimedia (3)
MART 546 Screenwriting (3)
ENGL 500 Creative Writing: Experimental Fiction (3)
ENGL 501 Creative Writing: Advanced Poetry (3)
ENGL 515 Methods of Tutoring & Teaching Writing (3)
ENGL 535 Selected Topics in English (3)
ENGL 543 Sociolinguistics (3)
ENGL 5/650 Seminar in English (1 – 4)
ENGL 565 Nonfiction Prose (3)
ENGL 585 Stylistics (3)
ENGL 651 Images & Words: Semiotics (3)
ENGL 661 Literacy and Orality (3)
ENGL 671 Creative Writing Workshop (3)
Concentration Total: 9 credit hours
Core Total: 15 – 18 credit hours
Electives: 9 – 12 credit hours
Program Total: 36 credit hours

 


Concentration in Creative Writing

Students must take nine credits in creative writing courses, including at least three credits of ENGL 671: Creative Writing Workshop. This course may be repeated with a change of content. 

Choose three courses from the following: 

ENGL 500 Creative Writing: Experimental Fiction (3) 

ENGL 501 Creating Writing: Advanced Poetry (3) 

ENGL 510 Creative Nonfiction (3) 

ENGL 535 Selected Topics in English (1-4) 

ENGL 585 Stylistics (3) 

ENGL 671 Creative Writing Workshop (3) 

Concentration Total: 9 credit hours 

Core & Electives Total: 27 credit hours 

Program Total: 36 credit hours 


Examinations

All students must pass a written qualifying examination based on a reading list approved by the thesis committee, the director of graduate studies, and the department chair. 


Language Requirement

In addition to the 36 credits required for the MA, students must demonstrate reading knowledge of a language other than English. The language requirement may be fulfilled by: 1) completing the final course of a four-semester undergraduate sequence in a language with a grade of B; 2) completing a 300- or 400- level course with a grade of B; 3) passing a test administered by the Department of English; or 4) passing a comparable test offered by another institution and approved in advance by the English graduate committee. 


English (ENGL), Courses in

ENGL 500. Creative Writing: Experimental Fiction (3); Alt, Sp, Odd 
This course examines advanced fiction writing with an emphasis on experimental techniques, styles, and approaches, including stream-of-consciousness and fictive autobiography. The reading component of this course will include theoretical and creative texts.

ENGL 501. Creative Writing: Advanced Poetry (3); Alt, Fa, Even 
A writing workshop for experienced poets.  Students will write original poems and read twentieth century poetry and poetics from the United States and around the world.

ENGL 502. Literary Theory (3); Sp 
Intensive study of theories of literature from Plato to the present, with an emphasis on contemporary literary theory. Application of these theories to various works, ancient and modern.

ENGL 505. Gender and the Politics of Literacy (3); Var 
Exploration of the historical connections between literacy and reason/emotion, focusing on how each has been historically gendered.  It begins with a history of style and how metaphors of gender have been used to describe writing.  It includes a study of how cultural beliefs about literacy shape our conceptions of “individuality,” “citizenships,” “aesthetics,” “rationality,” and “originality,” and how those categories apply differently to men and women.

ENGL 510. Creative Nonfiction (3); Alt, Sp, Odd 
This course is a writing workshop that provides the background, theories, and methods for students to produce original creative nonfiction writing. The course emphasizes forms and practices of various sub-genres of creative nonfiction including the personal essay, the memoir, literary reportage, and the nonfiction novel.

ENGL 511. Major American Writers (3); Sp 
In-depth study of a major author or authors, school, genre, and tradition in American literature.  Possible topics include literature of the American West, American Modernism, and American poetry.  May be repeated with change of content.

ENGL 512. Major British Writers (3); Sp 
In-depth study of a major author or authors, school, genre, or tradition of British literature. Possible topics: are Byron and the “Satanic School,“ and The British Moderns (Lawrence, Woolf, Joyce). May be repeated with change of content.

ENGL 514. Literary Realism (3); Var 
Covers the international development of the theory and practice of the realist novel.

ENGL 515. Methods of Tutoring and Teaching Writing (3); Fa 
This course will prepare students to tutor and teach readers and writers at the college-level. Students will study composition theory and develop a course syllabus and materials for teaching a writing class. Students will also tutor college writers as part of their coursework.

ENGL 521. Chaucer (3); Var 
Intensive study of The Canterbury Tales and selected minor works.

ENGL 522. Shakespeare (3); Fa 
Intensive study of a group of Shakespeare’s plays, such as comedies, tragedies, Greek plays, English history plays, or late romances. May be repeated with a change of content.

ENGL 523. Milton (3); Var 
Intensive study of Paradise Lost and selected minor works.

ENGL 534 – 634. Practicum (1 – 4 VC); Fa, Sp 
Students gain practical knowledge through internships in such areas as tutoring, editing, public relations, and feature writing.

ENGL 535. Selected Topic in English (1 – 4 VC); Var 
Course in a topic or topics in English. May be repeated with change in content.

ENGL 541. History of the English Language (3); Sp 
Investigation of the origin of modern English, with a study of the evolution of English sounds, inflections, vocabulary, and syntax, from earliest times to the present.

ENGL 542. Contemporary English Linguistics (3); Var 
An examination of the structures, processes, and functions of elements of the English language, with particular attention to their description in the theories of cognitive grammar.

ENGL 543. Sociolinguistics (3); Alt, Sp, Odd 
A study of dialects, bilingualism, multilingualism, speech communities, and regional and social variations as they relate to linguistic variables. Course includes methodological concern and relationships between sociolinguistics and related disciplines.

ENGL 550 – 650. Seminar in English (1 – 4 VC); Var 
Seminar course in a topic or topics in English.

ENGL 565. Non-Fiction Prose (3); Alt, Sp, Even 
An introduction to the reading, analysis, and writing of nonfiction works, such as biography, political prose, propaganda, history, and the essay. Emphasis on critical reading and thinking, interpretative skills, and writing nonfiction forms. The reading component of this course will include theoretical and creative texts.

ENGL 582. Literature of the Southwest (3); Var 
An examination of the tri-cultural literary heritage of the southwestern United States. Readings include journals and diaries of the Territorial Period, as well as imaginative works by novelists of the Southwest. Emphasis is placed on cultural traditions that shaped the literature.

ENGL 585. Stylistics (3); Var 
An examination of linguistic principles, specifically as they apply to the analysis of written texts. Students will learn to make the kind of textual observations needed to reveal stylistic traits and tendencies in the language of literature.

ENGL 590 – 690. Independent Study (1 – 4 VC); Var 
Independent study of selected author(s) or topic(s) arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ENGL 591. Arthurian Literature (3); Var 
Literature generated by the legends of King Arthur and his court, studied in a variety of European texts from the Middles Ages.

ENGL 592. Independent Research (1 – 4 VC); Var 
Independent research project arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ENGL 601. Research Methods in English (3); Fa 
Methods, sources, and tools of research for linguistics, composition, and literature.

ENGL 602. Theories in Writing (3); Var 
A comprehensive background of the development of writing programs, theory, and research in American education. Attention to the writing process, as well as genres of both academic and non-academic settings.

ENGL 603. Contemporary Literary Theories (3); Var 
An in-depth study of a topic or combination of related topics involving current trends in literary theory. Varying subtitles for the course might include literary canon formation, deconstructionism, feminist theory, new historicism, psychoanalytic theory, Marxist theory, reader-response criticism, and comparative literature. May be repeated with a change of topic.

ENGL 610. Major American Poets (3); Var 
Intensive reading and study of four important American poets of the twentieth century. Different poets will be featured each time the course is offered. Class discussion of the poets and their work will be the focus of the course.

ENGL 636. Varieties of Romanticism (3); Var 
A consideration of the varieties of Romanticism across time and cultures, contextualization of the British Romantic experience against the background of developments in Germany and France, and an examination of the heritage of Romanticism in all its postmodern vitality.

ENGL 641. The History of Popular Literature (3); Var 
A survey of the development of popular literature, from the “street literature” that emerged in the decades immediately following the invention of movable type, to the genre fiction of today. Readings will include popular literary works in a variety of genres, such as romance, horror, and thrillers.

ENGL 651. Images and Words: Semiotics (3); Var 
A semiotic approach to the study of meaning. Various sign systems, as expressed in the visual and verbal representations of cultural practice, myth, and literature will be examined.

ENGL 661. Literacy and Orality (3); Var 
A survey of the development of alphabetic writing in the West. Issues covered include writing and cognitive development, conflicting definitions of literacy, politics of literacy, and literacy education.

ENGL 671. Creative Writing Workshop (3); Alt, Sp, Even 
This course is an advanced workshop in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction. Students will read works in and theories of the genre and produce a portfolio of original works. The reading component of this course will include theoretical and creative texts.

ENGL 696. Publishable Papers (1 – 3 VC); Fa, Sp 
Individual research, writing, and rewriting in preparation of the graduate portfolio. Cannot be taken for elective credit. Only 3 credit hours count towards the degree, but students will register for extra credit hour ENGL 696 in the semester in which they graduate. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

ENGL 699. Thesis (1 – 6 VC); Fa, Sp 
Individual research and writing in preparation of the graduate thesis. After enrolling for thesis, students must continue to enroll for at least one credit hour of thesis each semester until the thesis is completed. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

Philosophy (PHIL), Courses in 
PHIL 500. Major Philosophers (3); Var
This course is a study of a major philosopher’s work. Examples of possible offerings are the pre-Socratics, Socrates and Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Descartes, Spinoza, Locke, Hume, Kant, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Bergson, Kierkegaard, Heidegger, Sartre, Husserl, Wittgenstein, Merleau-Ponty, and others. May be repeated with change of content.

ENGL 505. Major Philosophical Movements (3); Var 
This course is a study of a major philosophical movement or philosophy. Examples of possible offerings are analytic philosophy, phenomenology, process philosophy, logical positivism, ethics, epistemology, and the philosophy of negation. May be repeated with change of content.

ENGL 525. Reasoning Skills for the Schools (3); Var 
This course is a general introduction to the basic skills involved in reasoning and critical thinking, and how they may be incorporated into the curricula of the schools.

ENGL 530. Scientific Reasoning (3); Var 
This course is an examination of the general structure of scientific reasoning, including the logic of discovery, explanation, theory building, and decision making.

ENGL 535. Selected Topic in Philosophy (1 – 4 VC); Var 
Course in a topic or topics in philosophy. May be repeated with change of content.

ENGL 540. Philosophy of Art and Aesthetics (3); Var 
This course is an advanced study of the theoretical grounds for various philosophic theories of art, and their consequences for the world of art and art criticism.

ENGL 550. Seminar in Philosophy (1 – 4 VC); Var 
Seminar course in topic or topics in philosophy.

ENGL 572. Cognitive Science (3); Var 
This course is an interdisciplinary investigation of the foundations of human knowledge, representation and understanding, the functioning of the human brain, and how these impact recent computer technologies. Cross-listed as: PSY 572 and CS 572.

ENGL 584. Philosophy of History (3); Var 
This course is a chronological survey of the development of the concept of history and its philosophical foundations. Cross-listed as: HIST 584.

ENGL 590. Independent Study (1 – 4 VC); Var 
Individual, directed study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

 

This degree is under the College of Arts and Sciences