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School of Social Work


Cristina Durán Ph.D., Dean
Lora Shields Science Building
505.260.6183
FAX: 505.454.3290


Message from the Dean

Continuing Education Units | Field Education | Faculty | Field Forms | Financial Aid | Student Handbook

2017-2018 packet and admission requirements: Click here


Cristina Durán Ph.D., Dean
Lora Shields Science Building
505.-260-6183 or 505.454-3563
FAX: 505-454-3290
email: duranc@nmhu.edu
www.nmhu.edu/socialwork


New Mexico Highlands University invites you to apply for admission to the Facundo Valdez School of Social Work, which has been recognized by North Central Accreditation as an Academic School of Excellence.

Candidates best suited for a career in social work should be motivated to work in the human services field, have demonstrated academic potential, good oral and written skills, and have the interpersonal qualities to work with multicultural and diverse populations regardless of differences in social class, economic status, gender, sexual orientation, age, physical disabilities, ethnicity and culture. By pursuing a social work degree at New Mexico Highlands University, students make a commitment to learn and work with Hispanic and American Indian populations of New Mexico and the Southwest.

All applicants seeking undergraduate admission to New Mexico Highlands University must complete the application form, which is available through the Office of Admissions, the Highlands Recruitment Office, or online here.


Accreditation
The Facundo Valdez School of Social Work has been accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) since 1978 and has been accredited through 2020.


Mission of the School of Social Work

The New Mexico Highlands University Board of Regents approved, on December 17, 2015, a change in the name to the School of Social to honor the founder of the School, Facundo Valdez. The mission of the Facundo Valdez School of Social Work is to educate students to practice social work competently with the diverse, multicultural populations of New Mexico and the Southwest. This context of cultural and regional responsiveness informs the School’s creation and implementation of all its educational programs.

The School has a primary commitment to Hispanic and Native American people. Our curriculum grounds students in core professional social work values, skills and ethical principles, and provides a focused awareness and respect for cultural differences and how poverty affects the well-being of people in the region.

The School of Social Work (SSW) offers the Master of Social Work (MSW) degree program at the main campus, Las Vegas, New Mexico and at the following four campus locations:

  • NMHU School of Social Work (SSW) at Albuquerque, Albuquerque, NM
  • NMHU Rio Rancho Center, Rio Rancho, NM
  • NMHU at San Juan College (SJC), Farmington, NM
  • NMHU at Eastern New Mexico University – Roswell (ENMU-R), Roswell, NM

New Mexico Highlands University Mission

New Mexico Highlands University is a public comprehensive university serving our local and global communities. Our mission is to provide opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students to attain an exceptional education by fostering creativity, critical thinking and research in the liberal arts, sciences, and professions within a diverse community. For more information about our mission, click here.


Faculty and Administration

Social Work Faculty: Faculty members offer students the benefit of their professional experience and enhance the social work curriculum by assisting students in integrating classroom knowledge with social work practice. Adjunct faculty is utilized at all of the program locations to complement the full-time faculty. To view our complete faculty directory, please click here:

Facundo Valdez School of Social Work at Las Vegas (Main Campus)
Box 9000
Las Vegas, NM 87701
505.454.3563     FAX: 505.454.3290

Administration – School of Social Work at Las Vegas
Cristina Durán, Ph.D., LISW, Dean
Faculty – School of Social Work at Las Vegas 
Jeannette Baca, MSW
Benjamin Bencomo, MSW
Robert Deacon, Ph.D.
Jane Gorman, Ph.D.
Elisabeth Massaro, Ed.D.
Rebecca Moore, Ph.D.
Dolores Ortega, Ed.D.
Debra Rodda, MSW


Facundo Valdez School of Social Work at Albuquerque
401 Indian School Rd. NE, Suite 100
Albuquerque, NM  87110
505-260-6181      FAX: 505-896-6122

Administration – NMHU SSW Albuquerque
Cristina Durán, LISW, Ph.D., Dean
Faculty – Facundo Valdez School of Social Work at Albuquerque
Michelle Baca, MSW
Kevin Barnas, MSW, MPA
Judith Barnstone, Ph.D.
Kip Coggins, Ph.D.
Mark Dyke, Ph.D.
Amy Messex, MSW
Maria Munguia Wellman, Ph.D.
Samuel Terrazas, Ph.D.
Hamilton Williams, Ph.D.


Facundo Valdez School of Social Work Rio Rancho Center
See: NMHU SSW Albuquerque


Administration – NMHU at HEC
Jeannette Baca, MSW, Advisor
See also: NMHU SSW at Las Vegas


NMHU San Juan College
4601 College Boulevard
Farmington, NM 87402
505-566-3552     FAX: 505-566-3584

Administration – NMHU SJC
Rey Martinez, LMSW, Ph.D., Program Coordinator
Tori Miller, Field Secretary


NMHU at Eastern New Mexico University – Roswell
P.O. Box 6000
Roswell, NM 88202-6000
505-624-7458     FAX: 505-624-7454

Faculty – NMHU at ENMU – R
Cassandra Carrillo, LCSW, Program Coordinator
Matt Thompson, LMSW, Field Coordinator

Adjunct Faculty:Adjunct faculty is utilized at all of the program locations to complement the full-time faculty. These faculty members offer students the benefit of their professional experience and enhance the social work curriculum by assisting students in integrating classroom knowledge with social work practice.


Master of Social Work Program (MSW)
During the first year of the program, students are required to take a total of 31 credit hours of generalist social work practice courses. The first year curriculum and courses provide students with an overview of the social work profession’s historical evolution, including an introduction to the body of social work knowledge, values, and ethical principles. In addition, the curriculum addresses the areas of research, policy, and practice knowledge and skills required of all practicing social workers. Working with a diverse, Hispanic and American Indian population has particular emphasis throughout the curriculum.

During the first year, students apply generalist social work knowledge in a field practicum setting under the supervision of a licensed social work professional. The social work courses, combined with field practicum, afford students the opportunity to apply classroom knowledge in working with individuals, families, groups and communities within a specific agency setting.

Area of Concentration/Specialization
During the second year, students take courses in an area of concentration. The required courses build upon the first year foundation courses, providing students with specific course content and depth in a specific area of social work practice. The three areas of concentration offered include: clinical practice; leadership and administration; and bilingual/bicultural clinical practice

NMHU SSW-Las Vegas Campus, NMHU at ENMU-Roswell and NMHU at San Juan College ONLY offer the clinical practice concentration.

NMHU in Albuquerque offers all three concentrations: clinical practice; leadership and administration; and bilingual/bicultural clinical practice. The Substance Abuse Focus is also offered as a complement to the clinical practice concentration.

Students admitted to the MSW program are admitted into one of the three areas of concentration and take courses outlined in the program of study. All social work courses at all program locations use the same course syllabi and textbooks, which ensures continuity of content across all sites.

Students admitted to a specific program location that does not offer their preferred area of concentration may request to transfer during their second year to another NMHU program location. At any time during the student’s academic enrollment, she/he may transfer to any of the program locations with the approval by the school dean.


Field Education

Field education is an integral part of social work education.  Students in the program are provided an opportunity for applied learning, integrating classroom knowledge to real life situations working with individuals, families, groups, and communities.  Our field education program has a vast array of community, government and private agencies that work closely with our faculty in providing students supervision and instruction.  More than 300 agencies are affiliated with the school.  These agencies act as an extension of the classroom, providing students with the opportunity to work alongside highly qualified social work practitioners. The focus of our program is to reinforce the social work knowledge and values through service delivery and applied learning with the expectation that all students attain an acceptable level of competence necessary for effective social work practice.

Students have the opportunity to work with a wide range of populations and settings. Emphasis is placed on working with the diverse populations of New Mexico in rural and urban settings, which afford students to learn new skills and intervention strategies. Students spend a significant amount time in the program in a field practicum agency, engaging in social work practice applying social work theory to direct practice. The practicum placement setting is individually tailored and determined by the student’s interest, classification and area of concentration in the selected master’s program.
MSW Field Forms: Click here


Continuing Education Workshops

The School of Social Work Continuing Education Program is committed to provide accessible and affordable ongoing learning opportunities for practicing social workers. Workshops offered throughout the year focus on a variety of topics that help enhance the skills and knowledge for effective practice with the populations of New Mexico.

The counseling board accepts School of Social Work CEUs. It is recommended that you check with your accrediting board to ensure proper CEU acceptance.

In keeping with the school’s mission, several workshops focus on working with Hispanic and Native American populations of New Mexico and the Southwest. These workshops meet the required continuing education licensure renewal requirements as set forth by the NMSWEB.

Most workshops are on site in Santa Fe, Las Vegas, Albuquerque, Rio Rancho, Roswell and Farmington. The array of locations allows participants access to ongoing professional development.

For complete details about our Continuing Education department, including registration information, please click here


MSW/MBA Dual Degrees Program:
The Facundo Valdez School of Social Work, in collaboration with the School of Business, Media, and Technology, offers a joint program of study leading to the completion of two separate degrees in Social Work (MSW) and in Business Administration (MBA). Students interested in pursuing the completion of both degrees must be admitted to the two-year social work leadership and administration concentration. Upon completion of the first year MSW curriculum, students are then admitted into MBA human resource management concentration through the School of Business. The completion of both degrees is only open to students in the two-year MSW leadership and administration concentration. Both degrees must be completed within five calendar years from date of admission.

The dual degrees program is only offered at the NMHU SSW Albuquerque location. Students must meet the admission requirements of both schools.


Programs of Study
The MSW program prepares students for advanced social work practice in an area of concentration with the knowledge, skills, values and ethical principles necessary to practice with Hispanic, American Indian, and other diverse populations of New Mexico and the Southwest. The program prepares students at an advanced level to analyze and evaluate the role of the social work practitioner in the delivery of human services.

The school offers three types of programs to meet each student’s academic and personal needs. The three programs include: advanced standing; full time; and part time. Students MUST complete the MSW program within five calendar years from the date of admission.

  1. Advanced Standing (2–3 semesters). This program is limited to students with a BSW degree. Admission to this program is competitive and the number of students admitted varies among the following four program locations:
  • NMHU SSW at Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NM
  • NMHU SSW at Albuquerque, Albuquerque, NM
  • NMHU SSW at Rio Rancho, Rio Rancho, NM
  • NMHU SSW at Santa Fe, Santa Fe, NM
  • NMHU at SJC, Farmington, NM
  • NMHU at ENMU-R, Roswell, NM

The program is limited to individuals who have completed a Bachelor of Social Work degree from an accredited school of social work within five years from the date of enrollment. Students begin taking second year courses, within an area of concentration. Students must attend full-time and take their course work at the appropriate campus.

  1. Full-Time Program (4-5 Semesters). The full-time MSW Program is offered at:
  • NMHU SSW at Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NM
  • NMHU SSW at Albuquerque, Albuquerque, NM
  • NMHU Rio Rancho Center, Rio Rancho, NM
  • NMHU SSW at Higher Education Center, Santa Fe, NM
  • NMHU at SJC, Farmington, NM
  • NMHU at ENMU-R, Roswell, NM
  • NMHU SSW at Albuquerque, Albuquerque, NM
  • NMHU Rio Rancho Center, Rio Rancho, NM

The full-time program is intended for students who can attend on a full-time basis. Students at the NMHU SSW at Las Vegas, NMHU SSW at Albuquerque and the NMHU Rio Rancho Center campuses attend daytime and/or evening classes on Monday and Tuesday, and field practicum on Thursday and Friday.

  1. Part-time program (7-8 Semesters). Students may attend part-time at any of the following five program locations:
  • NMHU SSW at Las Vegas, NM
  • NMHU SSW at Albuquerque, NM
  • NMHU Rio Rancho Center, Rio Rancho, NM
  • NMHU SSW at Santa Fe, Santa Fe, NM
  • NMHU at SJC, Farmington, NM
  • NMHU at ENMU-R, Roswell, NM

The part-time program affords students the opportunity to attend classes during the day or evening and extend completion of the degree 3 to 5 years.


Admission Requirements

New Mexico Highlands University Facundo Valdez School of Social Work seeks to admit to its graduate programs candidates who demonstrate a personal and professional commitment to a career in social work, a readiness to pursue graduate education and a willingness to make a positive contribution in the lives of others. Candidates best suited for a career in social work must be motivated to work in the human services field, have demonstrated past academic potential, have good oral and writing skills, and have the interpersonal qualities to work with multicultural and diverse populations regardless of differences in social class, economic status, gender, sexual orientation, age, physical disabilities, ethnicity, and culture.

All applicants must apply for admission to the Facundo Valdez School of Social Work.
The requirements for admission to the graduate program and the School of Social Work include:

  • Bachelor’s degree from an accredited United States institution or proof of equivalent training at an institution outside the United States.
  • Grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 in the student’s major or upper-division courses (junior and senior-level courses) and in any graduate work completed.
  • Demonstrate a liberal arts education as part of the bachelor’s degree.

Application Information
All applicants seeking admission to the MSW program must complete the following information in order for the application to be considered complete and eligible for review and consideration. Information regarding the MSW program may be obtained from the School of Social Work at all program sites mentioned.


Facundo Valdez School of Social Work Graduate Application Criteria:

  1. Application for admission
  2. Official transcripts from each postsecondary institution
  3. Three reference forms (included in the MSW application packet)
  4. Completion of liberal arts course requirements
  5. Employment history
  6. Volunteer service experience
  7. Personal narrative statement
  8. Application fee*

*A $50 nonrefundable application fee is required from applicants who will be enrolling at NMHU for the first time.
*A $35 nonrefundable application fee is required from applicants currently or formerly enrolled at NMHU.
*A $35 nonrefundable application fee is required from students submitting a second application if previously denied admission.


Application Deadlines
January 15 is the priority deadline for submitting application materials. The school will accept applications after this date but is not obligated to review applicant files that are not submitted by the January 15 deadline. Applicant files are not reviewed until all materials have been received. Early application is strongly encouraged.


Review and Admissions Process
Applications are reviewed and rated by an admissions committee made up of faculty members. Recommendations for admission are made to the school dean and forwarded to the university Office of Graduate Affairs. Applications are competitively reviewed based on GPA, human services work and volunteer experience, references, academic and disciplinary history and the quality of the responses to the questions in the School of Social Work application.


Admissions Status
Students who have a minimum of a 3.0 GPA are admitted as “regular status.” Students may be admitted with less than a 3.0 GPA. Such students are admitted on “provisional status” with the requirement that the student must maintain a 3.0 GPA during the first semester (12 hours) of study. All applicants who apply by January 15 and are admitted will be notified in writing no later than May 30. If a student’s application is complete and has met the January 15 deadline, earlier notification may be made.

All graduate students must complete the MSW program within five academic years from the beginning of the first semester of the first year. Students who do not complete the program within the required time may request a one-year extension. An additional extension of time will require the following:

  • Complete testing-out exams on all work completed prior to the last five years.
  • Obtain approval from the dean of the School of Social Work.
  • Obtain approval from the university Academic Affairs Committee.

Denied Applicants
Applicants not admitted may reapply for admission. Submission of a new application is required.

Deferred Admissions
Students admitted to the School of Social Work can defer start date for a calendar year, without having to re-apply. Notification to the dean requesting deferral of a year must be submitted in writing.  Deferred admissions cannot be granted for more than a year.


Admission to Advanced Standing Status
To be eligible for Advanced Standing status, applicants must have a Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) degree from a CSWE accredited program and must have completed the BSW degree within five years from the date of anticipated enrollment in the MSW program. The number of students admitted into Advanced Standing status is limited and restricted to students who can attend full-time. A minimum of a 3.5 GPA is expected for admission into advanced standing.


Admission of Transfer Students
Students requesting to transfer into the Facundo Valdez School of Social Work from another social work program must meet all the admission requirements and must be transferring from a CSWE accredited program. The School accepts no more than one full academic year of acceptable course credit from another institution towards the MSW degree. Transfer students must complete at least the equivalent of one academic year at NMHU.


Admission Changes
Requirements for admission into the MSW program are subject to change. Please contact the School of Social Work for application information:

NMHU Facundo Valdez School of Social Work at Las Vegas
Office of Admissions
Attn: Lawrence Montano, Admissions Coordinator
Box 9000
Las Vegas, NM 87701
454-3310 FAX 454-3290
E-Mail: lmmontano@nmhu.edu


Student Association
Students are encouraged to participate in the Graduate Social Work Student Association (GSWSA) and other university student associations.


Student Stipends
The Facundo Valdez School of Social Work, in partnership with the Children, Youth, and Families Department (CYFD), offers stipends to students who wish to pursue a career in child welfare under the Title IV-E stipend program. All graduate level students are eligible to apply for the stipends. Students must conduct their field practicum with a CYFD office for one academic year.

Stipend recipients are required to take the SW 500 Children’s Services course. The average stipend amount awarded to students is $12,000 per academic year. The amount is prorated for part-time students. Amount of stipend award is subject to change.

Upon completion of the MSW program, stipend recipients must work for CYFD for a period of 18 months for each academic year a stipend is received. Stipend application information is provided to all students at the time of admission notification.


Request for Change of Concentration
Students admitted into the advanced standing program cannot request a change of concentration once admitted into the program. Full-time and part-time students are strongly encouraged to remain in the area of concentration to which they are admitted. However, under special circumstances, a student may request a change of concentration. A change of major concentration form must be submitted to the dean of the Facundo Valdez School of Social Work prior to the completion of first year of study.


Advisement
A faculty adviser is assigned to students at the time they enroll in the program. Students must develop a program of study with the assistance of their adviser.


Academic and Behavioral Expectations
All social work students are provided with a copy of the school’s academic and behavioral policy at the commencement of the academic year. The policy outlines expectations regarding students’ professional behavior and academic performance, sets forth grounds for suspension and expulsion from the social work program, and describes the procedures for disciplinary action. As more specifically detailed in the policy, students must demonstrate suitability for the profession of social work via appropriate and adequate classroom and field performance, ability to appropriately relate to colleagues and compliance with all other provisions of the academic/behavioral policy. All aspects of the School of Social Work’s academic/behavioral policy applies to all students enrolled in social work classes across all sites. The School’s policy concerning grade appeals is included in each course syllabi as part of the School of Social Work’s policies.


Code of Ethics
All students in social work are required to have knowledge of and adhere to the Social Work Code of Ethics.


Field Practicum/Internship
MSW students are required to complete a total of 928 hours of field practicum during the two years of the program either in concurrent or block placement. A total of 12 credit units are required during the two years of the program. The field practicum provides the opportunity to apply classroom knowledge in working with individuals, families, groups and communities within an agency setting. All practicum placements require the approval of the field education director/coordinator.

Concurrent field practicum is offered during the fall-spring or spring-summer terms. Students enrolled in a concurrent field practicum are placed with the same community agency for two days (16 hours per week) for two semesters. In addition, during the first semester, first year MSW students are required to take a field seminar course, designed to provide students with an opportunity to integrate classroom knowledge with their field practicum.

Block field practicum is only offered during the summer term. Students must complete all social work courses required for the concentration prior to beginning block placement. Students enrolled in block field practicum placement are placed with a community agency for five days, (40 hours per week) for approximately 12 weeks. First year MSW students must register for two field practicum courses and one seminar. Second-year MSW students must enroll in two field practicum courses. Field seminar is not required for second-year MSW students.

In the first-year field practicum, students are placed in a social service agency where they learn generalist practice methods working with individuals, groups, families, organizations, and communities. Students are required to develop specific learning objectives in consultation with their agency instructor and field consultant that incorporate and apply classroom knowledge to working with specific client groups or organizations. Part-time students begin their first year practicum during the second year of study.

The second year field practicum must be completed in the student’s chosen area of concentration.


Incomplete Grades
Incomplete grades in prerequisite courses must be completed prior to registering for the following semester. Students will not be permitted to continue until the incomplete (I) is removed from the official transcript.


Grade Point Average
A student earning a grade of C in a semester is considered passing if the student earns a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher.


Course Sequence Offerings
Courses are only offered once per academic year, fall and spring Semesters. During the summer semester, students may take elective course requirements and/or register for summer block practicum with prior approval. For Master of Social Work program guides and course sequencing please click here:


Master of Social Work Program (MSW)
During the first year of the program, students are required to take a total of 31 credit units of generalist social work practice courses. The first-year curriculum and courses provide students with an overview of the social work professions historical evolution, including an introduction to the body of social work knowledge, values, and ethical principles. In addition, the curriculum addresses the areas of research, policy, and practice knowledge and skills required of all practicing social workers. Working with a diverse, Hispanic and American Indian population has particular emphasis throughout the curriculum.

During the first year, students apply generalist social work knowledge in a field practicum setting under the supervision of a licensed MSW social work professional. Social work courses, combined with field practicum, afford students the opportunity to apply classroom knowledge in working with individuals, families, groups and communities within a specific agency setting.


Concentration in Clinical Practice
The primary objective of the clinical practice concentration is to prepare students to work as direct service practitioners with individuals, families, groups and communities in New Mexico and the Southwest. The concentration permits students to develop effective practice skills through the integration of social work knowledge and theory. The curriculum builds upon the first year foundation through courses in advanced practice methods. A multiple theoretical orientation is relied upon which recognizes the inter-relatedness of human problems, life situations and social conditions within multi-ethnic and multicultural populations of New Mexico and the Southwest.

The curriculum focuses on the analysis and synthesis of direct practice theories and interventions determined to be the most effective in improving the lives of ethnic minorities and other culturally diverse populations. Clinical practice services include intervening in crisis, identifying available community resources, short and long-term therapy and working as part of an inter-disciplinary team with other professionals. Students will be provided a broad awareness of social, cultural, and environmental conditions affecting clients. The skills developed in this concentration are clear communication, listening and interviewing skills, psychosocial assessment, formulation of treatment plans, and self-evaluation and research methods. The clinical practice concentration is offered at all program locations.


Concentration in Bilingual/Bicultural Clinical Practice (Albuquerque campus only)
The bilingual/bicultural concentration prepares students to be culturally and linguistically competent social workers to work directly with Spanish speaking populations of New Mexico and the Southwest. The curriculum immerses students in the Spanish language so they obtain necessary social work skills, values and ethical principles in order to serve monolingual Spanish speaking clients. The concentration prepares students for advanced practice through a unique bilingual/bicultural classroom setting and practicum placement whereby students are engaged in Spanish language application and interaction with peers, families and individuals. This concentration offers clinical skills and knowledge applicable to a wide variety of populations, with a special focus on serving Spanish speaking persons. Spoken Spanish is a focus; reading and writing is done in English.  Certain classes are taught in Spanish-only. Conversational Spanish is required for this program.

This concentration in only offered at the Albuquerque program location. All second-year concentration classes are offered in the evening.


Substance Abuse Program (Albuquerque campus only)
The School offers students an opportunity to specialize in substance abuse assessment and treatment through the completion of the Substance Abuse Focus within the clinical concentration. This program is only offered at the Albuquerque location. The program focuses on preparing social work practitioners utilizing evidence-based substance abuse treatment modalities.

The program is designed to address the shortage of licensed and credentialed substance abuse social workers in New Mexico.


Concentration in Leadership and Administration
The leadership and administration concentration prepares students for leadership and professional careers in local, state and federal government, and in nonprofit social service organizations. This concentration provides advanced courses in social policy analysis, management, leadership, budgeting and finance, human resource administration, economics, program evaluation and advanced evaluative research. This concentration emphasizes multiculturalism, diversity and social justice issues as they impact the delivery of social services within New Mexico and the United States. Experiential learning is provided through case studies and field internships in government and nonprofit organizations.


MSW/MBA Dual Degrees Program
The School of Social Work and the School of Business, Media, and Technology jointly offer students an opportunity to complete a master of social work (MSW) and a master of business administration (MBA) degree simultaneously. Students complete the MSW leadership and administration concentration in two full-time academic years. Upon completion of the MSW, students may continue to complete the MBA degree in human resource management by completing additional credit units of course work through the School of Business. Students admitted into the leadership and administration concentration may choose to pursue the MBA at any time during their program of study. Admission into the School of Business is required prior to the completion of the MSW degree.

Admission Requirements:
Students interested in pursuing the dual degree program MUST meet the admission requirements for both professional schools. Students MUST complete business course pre-requisites before commencing with MBA core classes.

 

Master of Social Work

First-Year Required Courses
First Year: Foundation Curriculum
Students must complete all required 500-level courses before proceeding to take second year 600 level courses. The first-year required courses must be completed before proceeding into the area of concentration/second year course requirements.

Required courses: 31 credit hours

Courses must be completed within the first year of the program.
SW 530 Evaluative Research (3)
SW 532 Field Practicum 1 (3)
SW 533 Law & Ethics in Social Work Practice (3)
SW 534 Field Practicum 2 (3)
SW 541 Social Policy & Services 1 (3)
SW 546 Understanding Difference (3)
SW 551 Field Seminar 1 (1)
SW 565 Social Work Practice 1 (3)
SW 566 Social Work Practice 2 (3)
SW 585 Human Behavior & Social Environment 1 (3)
SW 586 Human Behavior & Social Environment 2 (3)
Core Total: 31 credit hours

Second Year Required Courses
Second Year: Areas of Concentration

Concentration in Clinical Practice
Required courses: 24 credits
SW 601 DSM for Clinicians (3)
SW 633 Advanced Clinical Research (3)
SW 632 Field Practicum 3 (3)
SW 634 Field Practicum 4 (3)
SW 644 Group Work (3)
SW 652 Clinical Supervision (3)
SW 665 Advanced Multicultural Practice 1 (3)
SW 666 Advanced Multicultural Practice 2 (3)
Elective: 8 credit hours
Students are required to take 8 credit units of electives, which afford them the opportunity to enhance their area of clinical knowledge and skills.  At least 4 credits of electives must be at 600-level.  The remaining 4 credits can be at the 500 or 600-level.

Second-Year Concentration Total: 32 credit hours
First Year Core Total: 31 credit hours
Program Total (Two Year Program): 63 credit hours

Substance Abuse Focus (Graduate: Albuquerque campus only)
Students must be admitted to and complete the requirements for the Masters of Social Work clinical concentration.
Required courses: 15 credit hours
SW 528 Intro to Substance Abuse (2)
SW 601 DSM for Clinicians (3)
SW 620 Substance Use & Abuse (3)
SW 632 Field Practicum 3 (3)
SW 633 Adv. Clinical Research (3)
SW 634 Field Practicum 4 (3)
SW 635 Motivational Interviewing (1)
SW 644 Group Work (3)
SW 652 Clinical Supervision
SW 659 Co-occurring Substance & Mental Disorders (3)
SW 665 Adv. Multicultural Practice I (3)
SW 666 Adv. Multicultural Practice II (3)
Focus Total: 15 credit hours 

Concentration in Bilingual/Bicultural Clinical Practice
Required Courses: 32 credit hours
SW 631 Advanced Qualitative Research (3)
SW 602 DSM (Bilingual Practice) (3)*
SW 512 Immigrant Rights (2)
SW 632 Bilingual/Bicultural Practicum 3 (3)*
SW 667 Advanced Bilingual Practice 1 (3)*
SW 644 Group Work (3)
SW 652 Clinical Supervision (3)
SW 654 The Latino Family (2)
SW 668 Advanced Bilingual Practice 2 (3)*
SW 634 Bilingual/Bicultural Practicum 4 (3)*
Electives: 4 credit hours
Students are required to take four credit hours of electives, which afford them the opportunity to enhance their area of clinical knowledge and skills. Two (2) of these credits must be at 600-level.
*Conversational Spanish is required.
Second Year Concentration Total: 32 credit hours 
First Year Core Total: 31 credit hours 
Program Total (Two Year Program): 63 credit hours 

Concentration in Leadership & Administration
Required Courses: 32 credit hours
SW 605 Public Budgeting (3)
SW 609 Political Economics (3)
SW 630 Advanced Research 1 (3)
SW 632 Field Practicum 3 (3)
SW 634 Field Practicum 4 (3)
SW 642 Advanced Social Policy (3)
SW 651 Leadership & Supervision (3)
SW 664 Organizational Theory (3)
Elective Courses: 8 credit units
Students are required to take eight credit units of social work elective courses offered during the fall and spring semesters of the second year.
Second Year Concentration Total: 32 credit hours
First Year Core Total: 31 credit hours
Program Total: 63 credit hours

MSW/MBA Dual Degree Program
Required Second-Year Courses:
Social Work Courses:
SSW 625 Non-Profit Management (3)
SW 609 Political Economy (3)
SW 630 Advanced Agency Research (3)*
SW 632 Field Practicum 3 (3)
SW 634 Field Practicum 4 (3)
SW 642 Advanced Social Policy (3)
SW 651 Leadership & Supervision (3)
SW 664 Organizational Theory (3)*
Elective Courses: 8 credit units
Total SW courses: 32 credit hours

MBA Courses:  Contact School of Business, Media Arts and Technology; Designated courses in the MSW Leadership and Administration Concentration (with * above, SW 533 Law and Ethics and 3 credits of electvies) count toward the MBA degree; additional credits must be taken within the SOB to complete requirements for the MBA.


Social Work (SW), Courses in
Social Work courses are offered only once during the academic year. With the exception of social work graduate electives, all other courses are reserved solely for matriculating MSW students.

SW 500. Children’s Services (2); Var
This elective provides an overview of services for the protection of children. Additionally, it surveys child and family welfare policies and programs, with special emphasis on the New Mexico child welfare system.

SW 512. Immigrant Rights (2); Var
This course will examine major historical trends in migration to the United States; public policy regarding migration and the rights of immigrants; and the roles of governmental and nongovernmental organizations. Issues such as immigration enforcement; labor rights; and access to healthcare and public benefits will also be addressed.

SW 514. The Social Determinants of Health and Wellbeing (2); Var
The purpose of this course is to explore the social, societal, governmental, and environmental influences on health and wellbeing. We will investigate macro-level causes of individual and social problems so as to inform treatment and prevention programs and social policy. Specifically, the course will explore not only the health risk and protective factors in the physical and social environment that directly impact health, but also the ways in which they shape health behaviors, and the ways In which they can be addressed by community and governmental intervention.

SW 516. Social Work Practice with Military Families (2); Var
This course surveys the theoretical and practical methods or providing support to military families during the three phases or the deployment cycle. Factors supporting resilience in children and adults in military families will be identified, and diversity in military families explored.

SW 529. Family Violence (2); Var
The course surveys major sociological and psychological theories of family violence throughout the life span. Social and interpersonal factors contributing to family violence are explored in an ethnocultural context, with special emphasis on the Hispanic and Native American populations of New Mexico and the Southwest.

SW 530. Evaluative Research (3); Sp
The foundation research course introduces students to concepts of research for application in various human service contexts. The course covers elements of the research process, research design, statistical analysis, and the ethical issues in conducting research. Both qualitative and quantitative methods are presented, and issues relevant to research focusing on culturally diverse populations. Prerequisite: Evidence of having completed a statistics course within the past five years. SW 330 Research Methods meets this prerequisite requirement.

SW 532. Field Practicum 1 (3); Var
This foundation practicum sequence is designed to help students apply foundation knowledge of social work skills, values and ethics to practice. By providing a series of supervised assignments and tasks, the practicum experience will expose students to a variety of social work roles. Students will apply generalist social work knowledge, skills and values to practice with individuals, couples, families, groups and communities. Co-requisites: SW 565 and SW 551.

SW 533. Law and Ethics in Social Work Practice (3); Fa, Sp
This course examines areas of the law in which social work and the legal system intertwine. Major emphasis is placed on the operation of the legal system in New Mexico and the Southwest.  The course introduces students to critical principles, guidelines, reasoning strategies and legal concepts necessary to make informed, effective practice decisions.

SW 534. Field Practicum 2 (3); Var
This foundation practicum sequence is designed to help students apply foundation knowledge of social work skills, values and ethics to practice. By providing a series of supervised assignments and tasks, the practicum experience will expose students to a variety of social work roles. Students will apply generalist social work knowledge, skills and values to practice with individuals, couples, families, groups and communities. Co-requisite: SW 566.

SW 535–635. Selected Topic in Social Work (1-3); Var
One or more elective courses may be offered relating to advanced topics in social work practice.

SW 540–640. Social Work in Health Care Settings (2); Var
The course provides an overview of social work within the health care delivery system. Topics covered include the psychosocial dimensions of chronic illness, the treatment role of the social worker, and the funding of contemporary health care. Special emphasis is placed on health care delivery in the rural and urban settings of New Mexico and the Southwest, particularly with Hispanic and Native American populations.

SW 541. Social Policy and Services (3); Fa
This foundational policy course outlines the history of social welfare policy and the manner in which social services have been provided before and after the European conquest of New Mexico and the Southwest. It surveys contemporary social problems, and evaluates social legislation, policies, programs and political and social manifestations of racism, sexism and oppression. It also analyzes the impact of these on the diverse, historically vulnerable populations of the Southwest. It introduces students to advanced policy analysis and advocacy strategies that promote social justice.

SW 546. Understanding Difference: A Context for Social Work Practice (3); Sp, Su
This course examines the socio-cultural-political-historical context in which social work is practiced, with an emphasis on New Mexico and the Southwest.  The course provides a framework for understanding issues of diversity, oppression and social justice within the context of race/ethnicity, class, gender, sexual orientation and disability.  An interdisciplinary approach allows students to become familiar with the legacies of conquest and colonization in New Mexico and the Southwest, as well as understand how the dynamics of power and changing demographics impact and are impacted by people residing in the region.

SW 547–647. Resource Acquisition and Grant Writing in Human Services (2); Var
The course teaches systematic resource acquisition skills for human services. Special emphasis is placed upon resource acquisition within New Mexico and the Southwest, especially on behalf of Hispanic and Native American populations.

SW 551. Field Seminar (1); Var
This seminar is required during the first semester. It provides students with an opportunity to integrate practice theory with field practicum experience. Instructors will assist students with their understanding and application of social work knowledge to specific programs, issues, and concerns that arise in the provision of social work services. Co-requisites: SW 532 and SW 565.

SW 565. Social Work Practice 1 (3); Fa
This course presents the foundation skills necessary for the provision of generalist social work services to individuals. The course develops the direct practice knowledge and skills necessary for ethical and competent engagement, problem identification, assessment, intervention design, implementation, and termination with diverse, vulnerable, and at risk clients. Emphasis is placed on generalist social work practice with Hispanic, American Indian and other oppressed groups of New Mexico and the Southwest. Co-requisites: SW 532 and SW 551.

SW 566. Social Work Practice 2 (3); Sp
This course focuses on a critical and comparative analysis of frameworks, theories and models of social work practice. The course examines the four forces in psychology as the building blocks of an integrative, multicultural, ecosystems approach to social work practice. Implications of each practice approach for work at the micro, mezzo, and macro level are examined. Emphasis is placed on the evaluation of the practice approaches for work with diverse populations, with emphasis on the Native American, Hispanic and other oppressed populations of New Mexico and the Southwest. Prerequisite: SW 565.  Co-requisite: SW 534.

SW 568. Social Work Practice Skills (2); Var
This course is intended to provide student with the opportunity to refine skills that were introduced in required practice theory courses and to become familiar and proficient with skills in work with client systems and on skills that are required in the day to day functioning of social service organizations. The course will provide opportunities for students to practice the above skills individually and in conjunction with other students and student groups during class sessions. Most class sessions will include a didactic presentation of a skill or skills followed by time dedicated to experiential exercises and activities.

SW 585. Human Behavior and the Social Environment 1 (3); Fa
This two-semester course sequence critically examines traditional and alternative theoretical perspectives of human life course development and the environmental contexts within which development occurs.  The sequence explores the interactions among individuals and between individuals and families, groups, organizations, and communities.  Particular emphasis is placed on the influence of culture, race and ethnicity on human development and on the effects that oppression and social and economic injustice have on human behavior, with special consideration given to the diverse populations of New Mexico and the Southwest.

SW 586. Human Behavior and the Social Environment 2 (3); Sp
This two-semester course sequence critically examines traditional and alternative theoretical perspectives of human life course development and the environmental contexts within which development occurs.  The sequence explores the interactions among individuals and between individuals and families, groups, organizations, and communities.  Particular emphasis is placed on the influence of culture, race and ethnicity on human development and on the effects that oppression and social and economic injustice have on human behavior, with special consideration given to the diverse populations of New Mexico and the Southwest. This is the second course of a two semester sequence described above.  Prerequisite: SW 585.

SW 590–690. Independent Study (1 – 4 VC); Var
Independent study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

SW 601. DSM for Clinicians (3); Fa, Sp
This course will provide an overview of the DSM-IV TR classification. The cultural, gender, systemic, social and biological contexts for the expression, classification and assessment of conditions will be explores, including the biases and limits of the DSM categorical approach to understanding human nature. The class will utilize lectures, discussions and in-class exercises to emphasize how best to honor the particular strengths of individuals and cultures as they relate to the processes and procedures of diagnostic categorization.

SW 602 DSM (Bilingual) (3); Fa
This is a required course for the bilingual program.  It provides an overview of the DSM classification of mental disorders. In this course the focus is on the use of this classification system with Spanish-speaking populations and Spanish-speaking immigrants. It will work off the cultural formulation mode (CF) as outlined in the DSM IV appendix one, and expanded upon by other authors. The model is a systematic method of assessing cultural contribution to an illness presentation. It supplements the biopsychosocial approach by highlighting the effect of culture (in this case Latino culture) on the client’s symptomology, explanatory models of illness, help seeking preferences and outcome expectations. Along with the CF model each disorder will be covered focusing the literature that describes some of the cultural issues of each disorder.

SW 604. Mindfulness and Social Work (2); Var
Mindfulness, often defined as intentional awareness of present experience with acceptance, is increasingly employed as an intervention for stress reduction, depression, substance abuse relapse prevention, and anxiety. It is used in work with groups, families, and communities. Mindfulness is also seen as a core process in the therapeutic relationship as well in the self-development and self-care of social workers. This course will focus on the principles and practices of mindfulness relevant to the social worker, the helping relationship, and therapeutic applications with clients. Students will develop knowledge and skills that can be applied to clients experiencing a number of clinical issues, as well as laying the foundation for their own mindfulness practices.

SW 605. Public Budgeting (3); Var
This course focuses on public budgeting principles and processes and policy making process in federal, state and local government.  Topics include the history of budgeting, budget reform, ethical considerations, budget development, analysis, and revenue, expenditure forecasting, and state and local financial management. Prerequisites: SW 632 & SW 634.

SW 606. Brief Time-Effective Psychotherapies (2); Var
This course will provide a foundation for brief, time-effective clinical social work practice with individuals, couples, families, and groups. Emphasis will be placed on results-oriented, strength-based pragmatic clinical techniques and interventions that integrate various approaches including dynamic, behavioral, cognitive, strategic and solution-focused as examples.

SW 608. Diagnosis and Treatment of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (2); Var
This course surveys diagnosis of and social work practice interventions for the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder related to war, rape, terrorism, natural disaster, crime, violence, cult survivors and historic oppression of vulnerable populations. Psychotherapeutic, behavioral, chemo-therapeutic, inpatient and self-help approaches to individuals, families and groups will be presented, with special emphasis on interventions appropriate to the Hispanic and Native American population of New Mexico and the Southwest.

SW 609. Political Economy (3); Sp
This course reviews the government’s effect on the economy, specifically reviewing the impact of the political process on government behavior; how government influences the behavior of private and public economics and the extent of government intervention in the allocation and distribution of economic resources.

SW 610. Crisis Intervention (2); Var
This course will provide models for understanding the process of crisis formations as well as models for enhancing functioning by changing the perception of the precipitating event and facilitating the acquisition of new coping skills. Practical strategies and guidelines will be presented for a basic model of crisis intervention with an emphasis on developing and maintaining rapport, identifying the meanings, perceptions and subjective distress related to the precipitating event and exploring, encouraging and presenting alternative coping behaviors.

SW 613. Psychopharmacology for Social Workers (2); Var
This course will provide an overview of psychologically active (psychotropic) drugs commonly used in clinical practice and diagnostic conditions for which they are targeted. The focus will be on information relevant to mental health professionals whose clients are taking or may be prescribed psychotropic medication. The class will utilize lectures and discussions to emphasize multimodal mental health treatment that integrates psychological, systemic, social, biological and medical models of mental health.

SW 618. Jungian Approach to Play Therapy (2); Var
This class will present play therapy from a Jungian perspective. Play is the language of children, through which they can express their feelings, describe conflicts and develop strategies for meeting developmental challenges.  Lectures will be given on active imagination, ceremony, Jungian theory and concepts, developmental obstacles such as shame and loss, art therapy, sand tray therapy, and work with victims of abuse/neglect.  Students will be asked to engage in a series of self-knowledge activities, since one of the basic beliefs of Jungian psychology is that the practitioner’s self-knowledge is key to working with others. Prerequisite: Completion of 500-level courses.

SW 620. Substance Use and Abuse (3); Fa
This course focuses on substance sue disorders from a holistic, bio/psycho/social theoretical perspective.  All aspects of substance use and abuse will be explored within the multicultural spectrum, with a special focus on how substance abuse impacts the brain.

SW 623. Couples Therapy (2); Var
This course is designed to investigate clinically proven, evidence based approaches to couples therapy, enabling the student to use the most effective treatment models in their practice. Each stage of the relationship lifecycle is explored, allowing the student to apply treatment approaches for each stage. The course maintains a focus on the diversity within adult couples within changing multicultural contexts.

SW 625. Non-Profit Management (3); Sp
Nonprofits continue to be a source of significant community structure, support and identity. They are shaping public policy, delivering services, mobilizing for collective impact, contributing to our economies, and in general facilitating community participation and influence that creates effective societies. This course will explore the nonprofit industry as it exists today and discuss the role of leadership as it pertains to maintaining the legal, ethical and financial integrity of the non-profit organization.  The basics of running non-profit agencies and organizations will be addressed.

SW 630. Advanced Research (3); Fa
This course teaches advanced research skills necessary for program evaluation. Topics covered include qualitative and quantitative research methods, research design, analysis of research reports, the use of statistical packages for data analysis for practice and program evaluation.

SW 631. Advanced Qualitative Research (3); Fa
In this course students will learn about selected qualitative research methods with a focus on acquiring skills in the method of life story interviewing.  Students will also develop skills in analyzing interdisciplinary texts that employ qualitative research methods.  These texts and readings will introduce students to the socio-historical-political context of New Mexico and the Southwest, as well as the diversity of its Latino/Mexicano populations. These broader perspectives, along with the lived experience of native Hispanic New Mexicans and Mexican nationals and other Latinos reflected in personal narratives, forms the context for social work as it is practiced in New Mexico and U.S.-Mexico border region.

SW 632. Field Practicum 3 (3); Var
The advanced field practicum sequence is designed to help students continue to develop a professional identity as a social work practitioner as well as to improve practice skills through experiential learning and supervision. This course will build on advanced practice skills learned in the foundation practice courses.

SW 634. Field Practicum 4 (3); Var
The advanced field practicum sequence is designed to help students continue to develop a professional identity as a social work practitioner as well as improve upon practice skills through experiential learning and supervision. This course will build on advanced practice skills learned in the foundation practice courses.

SW 640. Social Work in Healthcare Settings (3); Var
The course provides an overview of social work within the health care delivery system. Topics covered include the psychosocial dimensions of chronic illness, the treatment role of the social worker, and the funding of contemporary health care. Special emphasis is placed on health care delivery in the rural and urban settings of New Mexico and the Southwest, particularly with Hispanic and Native American populations.

SW 642. Advanced Social Policy (3); Sp
This course examines the social policy planning, advocacy, and implementation process, as well as the professional social worker’s policy role. The use of frameworks for policy analysis at the agency, community, political, and legislative levels is discussed. Strategies and techniques for skillful social change interventions in the policy arena are taught. The influences of such factors as oppression, racism, ageism, and homophobia on policy planning at the administrative and agency levels (and in both urban and rural areas) is also examined. Emphasis is placed on the impact of social policy and planning on Hispanics, Native Americans, and other diverse populations of New Mexico and the Southwest.

SW 644. Group Work (3); Sp, Su
This course examines a range of groups found in historical and contemporary social work practice, and explores group stages and dynamics in the context of various theoretical approaches. Within a social justice framework, special emphasis is placed on ethical and practical issues of group work with historically oppressed populations.

SW 645. Grief and Loss (2); Var
The course surveys relevant theory pertaining to the grieving process. Multiple types of loss, including death, divorce, health problems and career transitions, are discussed in an ethno-cultural context. The course also educates students in the design and implementation of grief interventions with individuals and families. Specific emphasis is placed on the design of grief interventions with the diverse populations of New Mexico and the South west, including Hispanic and Native American peoples.

SW 647. Resource Acquisition and Grant Writing (2); Var
The course teaches systematic resource acquisition skills for human services. Special emphasis is placed upon resource acquisition within New Mexico and the Southwest, especially on behalf of Hispanic and Native American populations. 

SW 648. Addictions & Substance Abuse (2); Var
This course examines both abstinence-oriented and harm reduction interventions related to the prevention and treatment of addictive disorders, substance abuse and other compulsive behaviors. Approaches relevant to work with individuals, families, groups, and communities are presented, with special emphasis on the Hispanic and Native American populations of New Mexico and the Southwest. The influences of culture, race, ethnicity, gender, age, sexual orientation and disability in relation to addiction, as well as the effects of oppression and social economic injustice will be explored.

SW 651. Leadership & Supervision (3); Fa
This course examines relevant theory pertaining to the purpose, function and role of the social worker as administrator and manager. Management theory, leadership styles, and working within a diverse workforce are presented with special emphasis on working within administrative environments in New Mexico and the Southwest.

SW 652. Clinical Supervision (3); Sp
This course is intended to focus specifically on the role and function of the social work supervisor in human service agencies. Social workers in supervisory position are increasingly accountable for the clinical practices of their subordinates. Ultimately, the supervisor is responsible for the quality of services delivered to clients/consumers in the community. This course will examine the historical background, theoretical concepts, and practical applications of supervisory methods in clinical supervision.  The course will prepare students with the knowledge and skill to be competent supervisors of other social work practitioners as well as other human services staff.

SW 654. The Latino Family (La Familia Latina) (2); Sp
This family therapy course focuses on advanced clinical preparation in knowledge and skills (including management, assessment, intervention and evaluation) necessary for social work practice with families that are monolingual in Spanish or bilingual/bicultural (Spanish/English) with a focus on families native to New Mexico and the Southwest as well as immigrant families. Emphasis is placed on the adaptive capabilities of Latino families and on the issues of racism, discrimination, cultural adaptation, migration and sociopolitical issues.

SW 659. Co-Occurring substance Abuse and Mental Disorders (3); Sp
This course provides students with a social work understanding of co-occurring substance abuse and mental health disorders.  It focuses on assessment, treatment planning, and interventions at the individual, group, family, and community levels.  Prerequisites: All MSW 500 level foundation coursework and SW 601.

SW 664. Organizational Theory (3); Fa
This course provides an analysis of formal organizations and informal relationships among individuals and small groups.  This course stresses the study of business organizations as a system of authority and status, control and communication, decision-making centers and leadership positions.  Current research and case studies are used for analysis.  Co-requisites: SW 632 and SW 634.

SW 665. Advanced Multicultural Practice 1 (3); Fa
This is the first of two practice courses offered during the concentration year. This class offers students preparation in skills necessary for clinical social work practice with individuals, including interviewing, assessment, diagnosis, and treatment planning. The western, scientific approach to diagnosis and treatment using the DSM IV is examined as well as alternative approaches used by diverse clients. Emphasis is placed on practice with Hispanic, American Indian and other oppressed populations of New Mexico and the Southwest. Co-requisite: SW 632.

SW 666. Advanced Multicultural Practice 2 (3); Sp
This course prepares students with the knowledge and skills necessary for clinical practice with children, adolescents and families. Interviewing, assessment, diagnosis treatment planning with families and children are addressed. A social justice perspective on advanced practice with Hispanics, Native Americans and other oppressed populations is emphasized. Prerequisites: SW 665 and SW 632. Co-requisite: SW 634.

SW 667. Advanced Bilingual Practice 1 (3); Fa
This is a two-semester practice course in which students are introduced to Spanish speaking cultures of New Mexico and to the diversity within this culture.  This course strengthens the Spanish language skills of Spanish-speaking students.  In addition, it trains them in a culturally competent approach to symptomatology in treatment and equips them with interviewing, assessment, and diagnosis skills from a bilingual, bicultural perspective using DSM.  Co-requisite: SW 631 and SW 632.

SW 668. Advanced Bilingual Practice 2 (3); Sp
This is the second in a sequence of courses in advanced practice, with a particular focus on Spanish speaking clients.  The course focuses on the development of clinical competency in social work with Hispanic families, children, and adolescents.  The emphasis is on work with vulnerable populations in crisis, trauma intervention, and special issues in practice with children and adolescents in a variety of clinical settings.  The course integrates bilingual/bicultural, multicultural, diversity, social justice, and social change content, particularly as it relates to Spanish-speaking communities of New Mexico and the Southwest.  Co-requisite: SW 662 and SW 634.

SW 689. Social Work Practice and Services in School Settings (2); Var
The course examines the social worker’s roles, responsibilities, and services in school settings, particularly with the school systems of New Mexico and the Southwest.

SW 691. Child Welfare Practice and Services (2); Var
The course provides an overview of practice and policy issues, problems, and opportunities in the provision of child welfare services in New Mexico and the Southwest.

SW 692. Independent Research (1 – 4 VC); Var
Individual directed research arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.