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Department of English


Brandon Kempner, Department Chair
Douglas Hall, Room DH 148
505-454-3286 FAX: 505-454-3389
E-mail: bkempner@nmhu.edu


English Department Information


Mission of the Department of English

The mission of the Department of English and Philosophy is to provide quality education leading to intellectual growth and professional success. Majors and minors are offered in English and professional writing. The program is committed to preserving, interpreting, and promoting the unique multicultural heritage of the region.

The undergraduate program in the Department of English and Philosophy endeavors to develop fluency in the use of English through critical, creative, and technical writing. The departmental curriculum is designed to meet a variety of interests: literature, creative writing, linguistics, rhetoric, cultural studies, mythology, and professional writing. Study of English prepares students for careers in teaching, publishing, arts, journalism, technical writing, business, law, and government.


Resources and Facilities

Resources and Facilities

The Department of English is located in Douglas Hall, a renovated building that houses classrooms, the Writing Center, the Language Learning Center, and offices for faculty and graduate assistants in the humanities.

The Department of English provides the services of the Writing Center to students in the English composition sequence and in other undergraduate University courses. The facility offers individual tutoring and small group work. The Writing Center offers one-on-one instruction in all stages of the writing process, including developing ideas, writing with appropriate organization and style, and accurately citing sources.

The English Department houses a literary journal, The New Mexico Review, which publishes poetry, fiction, and essays. The department also sponsors a chapter of the international English honor society, Sigma Tau Delta, as well as Bindings, the English club.


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Brandon Kempner
Chair of Department/Professor
PhD. Pennsylvania State University, 2006
bkempner@nmhu.edu
505-454-3286

Teaching and research interests include 19th, 20th and 21st Century American literature, Southwestern literature, multi-ethnic American literature, literary theory and popular culture.


Woodford-Gormley

Donna Woodford-Gormley
Professor
PhD. Washington University, 1999
dwoodford@nmhu.edu
505-454-3253
Webpage

Teaching and research interests include British literature to 1700, international Shakespeare, early modern Renaissance women writers, Isabella Whitney, orphans and foster children in Renaissance literature, motherhood in Renaissance literature, Harry Potter and fairy tales.


 

Helen_Blytheweb

Helen Blythe
Professor, Director of Graduate Studies
PhD. Stanford University, 1998
helenblythe@nmhu.edu
505-454-3329
Webpage

Teaching and research interests include 19th, 20th, and 21st Century British literature; colonialism and literature of empire, genre studies including romance, pastoral, gothic and aesthetics; Anglophone, and postcolonial literatures and theory; literary vampires and theory.


 

Peter_Buchanan_web
Peter Buchanan
Assistant Professor of English, Director of Undergraduate Studies
Ph.D. Medieval Studies, University of Toronto, 2013
pbuchanan@nmhu.edu
505-454-3191

Teaching and research interests are historical linguistics, modern grammar, medieval literature, Old English and Anglo-Latin poetry, hagiography, manuscript studies, Old Norse, Middle English, phenomenology and literary theory.


 

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Lauren Fath
Assistant Professor
Ph.D., University of Missouri, 2015
lfath@nmhu.edu
505-454-3415

Teaching and research interests are creative nonfiction (including memoir, the personal essay, and the lyric essay), ethnographic writing, genre boundaries in creative writing, and Russian literature of the 19th and 20th centuries.


 

Juan_Gallegos_Phd_web

Juan M. Gallegos
Assistant Professor, Director of the Writing Center
PhD. University of Arizona, Tucson, 2014
jmgallegos@nmhu.edu
505-454-3451

Teaching and research interests include composition theory, pedagogy, and history, Basic Writing, Latino/a rhetorics, Nuevomexicano/a historical literacy practices, and NMHU history. Developing research interests include spatial rhetorics and writing centers.


 

McIntoshJason

Jason McIntosh
Associate Professor, Director of Composition
PhD. University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 2012
jlmcintosh@nmhu.edu
505-454-3450

Teaching and research interests include rhetoric and composition, place-conscious writing, place-based education, National Writing Project, computers and writing, writing centers, Writing Program administration.


 

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Tyler Mills
Assistant Professor of English
Ph.D. University of Illinois-Chicago, 2015
tcmills@nmhu.edu
505-426-2073

Teaching and research interests include contemporary poetry, theories of the lyric, poetic form, myth & genre, creative writing pedagogy, and digital media/ literary publishing.


 

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Eddie Tafoya
Professor of English
PhD. SUNY Binghamton, 1997
eddieT19@nmhu.edu
505-454-3207
Webpage

Teaching and research interests include creative writing: fiction; stand-up comedy as literature, American humor, the New Testament & American literature.


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Benjamin Villarreal
Assistant Professor
Ed.D. Teachers College, Columbia University, 2018
bjvillarreal@nmhu.edu
505-426-2283

Teaching and research interests are English Education, critical media literacy, game studies, multimodal composing & comics.


Overview

The Department of English offers intensive study of literature, writing, linguistics, mythology, and cultural studies. The program core for the major introduces students to a variety of the subdisciplines of English, including literature, creative writing, linguistics, literacy, composition, and criticism, all of which provide foundational knowledge of English studies while allowing students to discover the aspect of English they want to explore in their elective courses. The English major, in conjunction with the School of Education, prepares students for careers as secondary school English teachers. The department also offers a pre-professional major for those interested in preparing for graduate studies in law and other fields, or for careers in professional writing, advertising, or publishing.

Since the English major requires only 39 credit hours for completion, students are encouraged to double-major, selecting another major appropriate to their interests. Many English majors have found professional success by combining their study of English with majors in media arts, education, business, history, criminal justice, psychology, etc.

English minors have two options: a general minor with a literary emphasis or a minor in writing.
All English majors must consult with their adviser in English prior to registration each term. During the first meeting, the adviser and student will develop a long-term plan for completing the program.

English Education Track

Students preparing for careers as high school English teachers must major in English (in the English education track), minor in secondary education, and complete course work required for state licensure. They must consult with two faculty advisers, one in the English department and one from the School of Education. Furthermore, students in this track must take the New Mexico Teacher Assessment exam between their sophomore and junior year and must plan to have all coursework in English completed before the start of their final semester, which will be devoted to field preparation.

Pre-Professional Track

Students interested in majoring in English as preparation for professional careers in such areas as business, government, law, or administration should concentrate on courses in writing, and linguistics. Those specifically interested in law school should also take courses in philosophy and logic. This track is not intended for students pursuing teaching careers. The pre-professional track is recommended for students double-majoring in English and a field with heavy course requirements.

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Major in English (BA)

Traditional, English Education, and Pre-Professional Tracks
In order to earn a BA in English, students are required to complete at least 13, three-credit courses in English beyond the composition sequence (ENGL1060, 1110, 1120): a total of 39 credit hours. Students must also satisfy the following general distribution requirements:

Required core: 12 credit hours
ENGL 2610 American Literature I (3)
OR
ENGL 2620 American Literature II (3)
(However, both courses are recommended)
ENGL 2630 British Literature I (3)
ENGL 2640 British Literature II (3)
ENGL 3020* Literary Theory (3)
*To be taken in the junior year. Students in the pre-professional track may substitute any course in rhetoric, linguistics, or writing

Additional requirements: 9 credit hours
At least one course in grammar or linguistics: 3 credit hours
At least one course in advanced composition, rhetoric, or literacy: 3 credit hours
At least one course in creative writing: 3 credit hours
At least one course from the following: 3 credit hours
ENGL 4210 Chaucer (3)
ENGL 4220 Shakespeare (3)
ENGL 4230 Milton (3)
Other requirements: 6 credit hours
ENGL 4110 Major American Writers (3)
ENGL 4120 Major British Writers (3)

Electives:
Choose 3 courses for 9 credit hours.
Students majoring in English and minoring in secondary education must take:
ENGL 3170 Introduction to Modern Grammar (3)
ENGL 3500 Methods of Teaching Reading and Writing (3)
The remaining courses (for a total of 39 credit hours) are program electives.

Major Total: 39 credit hours
Core Requirements: 21 credit hours
Flex Requirements: 10 credit hours
Extended Requirements: 8 credit hours
Proficiency Requirements: 11-17 credit hours
General Electives to 120 (if needed): 5-11 credit hours
Minor: 20 credit hours minimum*
Total for degree: 120 credit hours*

* A minor is required. The number of electives to reach the degree total of 120 credit hours will vary by the number of credit hours required by the minor. The number of proficiency credit requirements will vary based on student placement scores. The University requires a minimum of 45 upper-division units for the degree.

 

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Minor in English

Required courses: 9 credit hours

ENGL 3170 Introduction to Modern Grammar (3)
Choose two courses from the following:
ENGL 2630 British Literature I (3)
ENGL 2640 British Literature II (3)
ENGL 2610 American Literature I (3)
ENGL 2620 American Literature II (3)

Electives: 12 credit hours

Minor Total: 21 credit hours

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Minor in English Writing

Required courses: 12 credit hours
ENGL 3170 Introduction to Modern Grammar (3)
ENGL 3650 Nonfiction Prose (3)
ENGL 3670 Technical Writing (3)
ENGL 4430 Sociolinguistics (3)
OR
ENGL 4850 Stylistics (3)
Electives: 9 credit hours
Choose three courses from the following:
ENGL 2410 Autobiography (3)
ENGL 2310 Introduction to Creative Writing (3)
ENGL 3050 Advanced Composition (3)
ENGL 3070 Writing as Advocacy (3)
ENGL 3090 A History of Writing (3)
ENGL 3100 Creative Nonfiction (3)
ENGL 3500 Methods of Teaching Reading and Writing (3)
ENGL 3620 Creative Writing: Poetry (3)
ENGL 3640 Creative Writing: Fiction (3)
ENGL 4000 Creative Writing: Experimental Fiction (3)
ENGL 4010 Creative Writing: Advanced Poetry (3)
ENGL 4410 History of the English Language (3)
ENGL 2/4340 Practicum (1-4)
ENGL 4630 Rhetoric and Reality (3)
ENGL 4640 Women and Rhetoric (3)

Minor Total: 21 credit hours
English (ENGL), Courses in

Note: Any 1000-, 2000- or 3000-level literature course will satisfy the core requirement in Area V: Humanities and Fine Arts. Courses marked with an asterisk (*) satisfy the extended core literature requirement.

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English (ENGL), Courses in

ENGL 1060. English Reading and Writing (3); Fa, Sp
This course offers instruction and practice in college-level critical reading and writing skills. It is designed to give students experience and practice developing academic inquiry needed for much of their coursework. Previous NMHU ENGL 106.

ENGL 1110. Composition I (3); Fa, Sp
In this course, students will read, write, and think about a variety of issues and texts. They will develop reading and writing skills that will help with the writing required in their fields of study and other personal and professional contexts. Students will learn to analyze rhetorical situations in terms of audience, contexts, purpose, mediums, and technologies and apply this knowledge to their reading and writing. They will also gain an understanding of how writing and other modes of communication work together for rhetorical purposes. Students will learn to analyze the rhetorical context of any writing task and compose with purpose, audience, and genre in mind. Students will reflect on their own writing processes, learn to workshop drafts with other writers, and practice techniques for writing, revising, and editing.
Prerequisite: 17 or higher on the ACT English Usage Test or completion of ENGL 1060 with a grade of C or better. Students may also test out through the ETS Advanced Placement exam. See the Office of the Registrar for details. Previous NMHU ENGL 111.

ENGL 1120. Composition II (3); Fa, Sp
In this course, students will explore argument in multiple genres. Research and writing practices emphasize summary, analysis, evaluation, and integration of secondary sources. Students will analyze rhetorical situations in terms of audience, contexts, purpose, mediums, and technologies and apply this knowledge to their reading, writing, and research. Students will sharpen their understanding of how writing and other modes of communication work together for rhetorical purposes. The emphasis of this course will be on research methods.
A grade of C or better in ENGL 1110 is required or 29 or higher on the ACT English Usage Test. Students may also test out through the CLEP exam. A grade of C or better is required in this course. See the Office of the Registrar for details. Previous NMHU ENGL 112.

ENGL 1350 – 4350. Selected Topic in English (1-4 VC); Var
Course in a topic or topics in English. May be repeated with change of content. Prerequisite: ENGL 1110. Previous NMHU ENGL 135-435.

ENGL 2078. Science Fiction (3)*; Var
Close reading and analysis of major science fiction works. Explores science fiction as cultural metaphor and modern myth. Prerequisite: ENGL 1110.

ENGL 2079. Horror Literature (3)*; Var
A study of the folk origins of the horror story and its manifestations in mainstream and genre fiction and film. Prerequisite: ENGL 1110.

ENGL 2084. Twentieth-Century Literature (3)*; Var
A study of modern sensibility as manifested in contemporary works written in English and English translation. Prerequisite: ENGL 1110.

ENGL 2230. Introduction to Popular Culture (3)*; Var
The course offers a survey of popular literary genres (horror, science fiction, etc.) as well as film and television. Students will analyze popular culture in the form of popular novels, songs, television shows, movies, comic books, and other cultural productions. Students will analyze this material in the same fashion as literature is analyzed, developing skills of cultural analysis and critique.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1110.Previous NMHU ENGL 277.

ENGL 2280. History of Argument (3); Var
Investigates the major figures and movements in rhetoric from the classical period to modern rhetorical theory, examining relations between rhetorical teaching and practice, culture, epistemology, and ideology. Prerequisite: ENGL 1120. Previous NMHU ENGL 252.

ENGL 2310. Introduction to Creative Writing (3); Alt, Fa, Odd
This course will introduce students to the basic elements of creative writing, including short fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. Students will read and study published works as models, but the focus of this “workshop” course is on students revising and reflecting on their own writing. Throughout this course, students will be expected to read poetry, fiction, and non-fiction closely, and analyze the craft features employed. They will be expected to write frequently in each of these genres. This course will provide students with introductions to various types of writing including poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, and playwriting. May be repeated with change of content. Prerequisite: ENGL 1110. Previous NMHU ENGL 262.

ENGL 2340 – 4340. Practicum (1-4 VC); Var
Students gain practical knowledge through internships in such areas as tutoring, editing, public relations, and feature writing. Prerequisite: ENGL 1110. Previous NMHU ENGL 234-434.

ENGL 2350. Introduction to Drama (3)*; Var
This course introduces students to drama as a literary form. Students will identify elements of the dramatic form, examining how the choices made by the playwright, director, actors, set designer, costume designer, and even the audience influence the performance. Students will also examine different types of plays, such as comedy, historical, and tragedy, and the influence of the historical, social, and political setting. Previous NMHU ENGL 151.

ENGL 2380. Introduction to Short Fiction (3)*; Fa, Sp
This course is an introduction to the study of long fiction, such as novels and novellas, focusing on the use of critical approaches to analyze the ways that narrative is created. Students will read and analyze a diverse range of texts that may include varying time periods, nationalities, regions, genders, and ethnicity. Previous NMHU ENGL 152.

ENGL 2310. Introduction to Creative Writing (3); Alt, Fa, Odd
This course will introduce students to the basic elements of creative writing, including short fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. Students will read and study published works as models, but the focus of this “workshop” course is on students revising and reflecting on their own writing. Throughout this course, students will be expected to read poetry, fiction, and non-fiction closely, and analyze the craft features employed. They will be expected to write frequently in each of these genres. This course will provide students with introductions to various types of writing including poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, and playwriting. May be repeated with change of content. Prerequisite: ENGL 1110. Previous NMHU ENGL 262.

ENGL 330 – 4340. Practicum (1-4 VC); Var
Students gain practical knowledge through internships in such areas as tutoring, editing, public relations, and feature writing. Prerequisite: ENGL 1110. Previous NMHU ENGL 234-434.

ENGL 2350. Introduction to Drama (3); Var
This course is an-depth study of a major playwright, sub-genre, or tradition of theater from different periods and locations. Possible topics include: Medieval Drama; Twentieth-Century European Drama; Theater of the Absurd; the British Theater Tradition; American Drama; Restoration Drama; others. Prerequisite: ENGL 1120.
Previous NMHU ENGL 251.

ENGL 2360. Introduction to Poetry (3)*; Var
This course is an introduction to reading and thinking about poetry. This course will involve the reading and analysis of poems from a variety of eras. By examining poetic features of tone, speaker, situation, setting, language, sounds, internal structure, and external form, students will build a foundation for complex critical thinking about what poems can do. All poems are porn out of particular literary and cultural contexts, which will also be discussed as part of this course’s inquiries into the nature of poetry and poetic form. Previous NMHU ENGL 272.

ENGL 2380. Introduction to Short Fiction (3)*; Fa, Sp
This course is an introduction to the study of short fiction, such as novels and novellas, focusing on the use of critical approaches to analyze the ways that narrative is created. Students will read and analyze a diverse range of texts that may include varying time periods, nationalities, regions, genders, and ethnicity. Previous NMHU ENGL 152.

ENGL 2410. Autobiography (3)*; Var
This course approaches autobiography through both theory and practice. Students will analyze major autobiographies, read critical commentary on the autobiography genre, and finally, produce their own autobiographical work using the course readings as models. This is a survey course in the close reading, analysis, and practice of personal narrative. The course covers a wide variety of autobiographical writing from the 19th century to the present. Prerequisite: ENGL 1110. Previous NMHU ENGL 214.

ENGL 2430. Fairy Tales (3)*; Var
An exploration of fairy and folk tales from a variety of cultures. The course introduces methods of analysis while exploring historical and contemporary roles and interrelationships of the tales. Fairy tales examined for their literary and cultural significance. Prerequisite: ENGL 1110. Previous NMHU ENGL 202.

ENGL 2610. American Literature I (3)*; Fa
A study of major American works that exemplify the changing philosophies and literary trends of Colonial America, the Early Republic, and the American Renaissance. Emphasis on changing views of humankind and God and on the literary treatment of the elusive “American Dream.” Prerequisite: ENGL 1120. Previous NMHU ENGL 294.

ENGL 2620. American Literature II (3)*; Sp
The development of American poetry and fiction from Mark Twain and the rise of realism to the present. Emphasis on the major literary schools and authors of the period. Prerequisite: ENGL 1120. Previous NMHU ENGL 295.

ENGL 2630. British Literature I (3)*; Fa
British literature from the early Middle Ages through the late Renaissance, including Beowulf, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, and selected works of Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Milton and others. Prerequisite: ENGL 1120. Previous NMHU ENGL 290.

ENGL 2640. British Literature II (3)*; Sp
A study of representative authors of the Neoclassic, Romantic, Victorian, and modern British periods. Prerequisite: ENGL 1120. Previous NMHU ENGL 291.

ENGL 2650. World Literature I (3)*; Var
Readings in world literature from the Ancient World through the comparative literature of the European Renaissance. This course excludes British and American literature. Prerequisite: ENGL 1120. Previous NMHU ENGL 292.

ENGL 2660. World Literature II (3)*; Var
Literature from the European Neo-classic period through the modern schools of Eastern and Western Literature. This course excludes British and American literature. Prerequisite: ENGL 1120. Previous NMHU ENGL 293.

ENGL 2690. Introduction to Shakespeare (3); Var
This course will introduce students to some of Shakespeare’s better-known plays, the time and culture in which they were written, and the ways they have been and are still performed. Prerequisite: ENGL 1120. Previous NMHU ENGL 274.

ENGL 2710. Classical Mythology (3)*; Var
Greek and Roman myths examined for their literary and cultural significance. Prerequisite: ENGL 1110. Previous NMHU ENGL 282.

ENGL 2730. Celtic Mythology (3)*; Var
Celtic myths and sagas of medieval Ireland and Wales, examined for their literary and cultural significance. Prerequisite: ENGL 1110. Previous NMHU ENGL 283.

ENGL 2740. Norse Mythology (3)*; Var
Norse mythology and sagas examined for their literary and cultural significance. Prerequisite: ENGL 1110. Previous NMHU ENGL 281.

ENGL 2990. Practicum (1-4 VC); Var
Practicum hours may be designated for a variety of activities that offer students the opportunity to use their English language skills in such areas as tutoring, editing, public relations, and feature writing. For every 1 hour of practicum credit, students must complete 4 work hours per week. Students meet on a regular basis with the practicum director/faculty advisor (preferably once a week) to verify progress, address problems and map further avenues of activity. Prerequisite: ENGL 1110. Previous NMHU ENGL 234-434.

ENGL 3020. Literary Theory (3); Alt, Sp, Even
An introduction to literary terms and to theories of literature from Plato to the present. Application to these theories to various works, ancient and modern. Prerequisite: Two English courses beyond ENGL 1120. Previous NMHU ENGL 302.

ENGL 3050. Advanced Composition (3); Var
This course examines the relationship between reading, writing, and thinking, and how the raft of writing can strengthen all three. Students will study different authors’ perspectives on an issue and develop their own written responses, crafted through sustained revision. Prerequisite: ENGL 1120. Previous NMHU ENGL 305.

ENGL 3070. Writing as Advocacy (3); Var
Students study writing as advocacy, or writings as social action taken on behalf of others. Our primary conceptual tool will be the literacy event, which foregrounds the situation, context, and the actors through which the consumption or production of print plays a role. Students select an individual, class of people, or organization for which to advocate, then research and create ways to act on their behalf. Prerequisite: ENGL 1120. Previous NMHU ENGL 307.

ENGL 3090. A History of Writing (3); Var
A cross-cultural study of writing and writing systems; the development of script, and the social contexts of use. Prerequisite: ENGL 1120. Previous NMHU ENGL 309.

ENGL 3100. Creative Nonfiction Workshop (3); Alt, Fa, Even
This is a workshop class in creative nonfiction. Students will read a variety of creative nonfiction texts and produce original creative nonfiction writing. Prerequisite: ENGL 1120. Previous NMHU ENGL 310.

ENGL 3120. Stand-Up comedy as Literature (3)*; Var
An in-depth examination of stand-up comedy in literature, how this most American of literary forms reveals and influences the American ethos, and the changes the ART form has undergone since its inception in the late nineteenth century. Prerequisite: ENGL 1120. Previous NMHU ENGL 312.

ENGL 3140. Women in Literature (3)*; Var
Study of literary works chosen to demonstrate the historical and contemporary representation of women in poetry and fiction. Prerequisite: ENGL 1120. Previous NMHU ENGL 314.

ENGL 3150. Native American Women’s Literature: Voices and Visions (3) *; Var
Study and exploration of women’s voices in contemporary Native American literature. Prerequisite: ENGL 1120. Previous NMHU ENGL 315.

ENGL 3170. Introduction to Modern Grammar (3); Fa
This class provides an introduction to the components of language-phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics – as well as various grammar models. Topics also include the relations between language and social contexts, and language and writing. Previous NMHU ENGL 317.

ENGL 3180. Chicano/a Literature (3)*; Var
A survey examining the major texts of the Chicano/a experience, including traditional, community-centered folktales and corridos, contemporary prose, poetry, drama, and nonfiction, supported by theoretical readings. Prerequisite: ENGL 1120. Previous NMHU ENGL 318.

ENGL 3250. The American Novel (3)*; Var
An in-depth study of classic American novels from the nineteenth century to the present day. Prerequisites: ENGL 1110 and 1120. Previous NMHU ENGL 325.

ENGL 3280. The Historical Gothic (3)*; Var
This course looks at the rise of gothic horror literature in the late-18th and 19th centuries, examining the historical, aesthetic, and social contexts that produced such works. Previous NMHU ENGL 328.

ENGL 3410. The Bible as Literature: Old Testament (3) *; Var
Study of Old Testament literature, emphasizing techniques and conventions of biblical narrative and poetry. Prerequisite: ENGL 1120. Previous NMHU ENGL 341.

ENGL 3420. The Bible as Literature: New Testament (3) *; Var
Study of New Testament literature, focusing on the various literary Arts of Gospels, Acts, Epistles, and Revelation. Prerequisite: ENGL 1120. Previous NMHU ENGL 342.

ENGL 3430. Eastern Spiritual Classics (3) *; Var
Literary aspects of the Eastern spiritual classics–Hindu, Buddhist, Taoist, Zen, Islamic, Sufi, Kabbalistic, and Hassidic. Prerequisite: ENGL 1120. Previous NMHU ENGL 343.

ENGL 3500. Methods of Teaching Reading and Writing (3); Var
Provides a review of traditional and current methods of teaching reading and writing. Students examine current reading and writing theory and research with an eye toward the implications for pedagogy. Previous NMHU ENGL 350.

ENGL 3620. Creative Writing: Poetry (3); Alt, Sp, Odd
An intensive and creative course in the craft of poetry. Course readings will include selected works and poetics. Objectives include the recognition and imitation of selected techniques and the writing of original works. Prerequisites: ENGL 1120 and ENGL 2360. Previous NMHU ENGL 362.

ENGL 3640. Creative Writing: Fiction (3); Alt, Fa, Odd
An intensive study of selected works of short fiction with emphasis on the components of this literary form; writing of original works in the form. Prerequisite: ENGL 1120. Previous NMHU ENGL 364.

ENGL 3650. Nonfiction Prose (3)*; Alt, Sp, Even
An introduction to the reading and analysis of creative nonfiction essays: biography, travel, nature, social commentary, the urban scene, sports, and the domestic and fine arts. Prerequisite: ENGL 1120. Previous NMHU ENGL 365.

ENGL 3670. Technical Writing (3); Fa, Sp, Su
Students develop the principles of scientific, professional, and technical writing. Major assignments include formal proposals and reports. Minor assignments include resumes, short reports, instructions, correspondence, and memoranda. Stress is placed on developing a clear and concise writing style. Prerequisite: ENGL 1120. Previous NMHU ENGL 367.

ENGL 3810. African-American Writers (3); Var
A study of the scope, excellence, and distinctive qualities of the writing of African-Americans in the United States. Prerequisite: ENGL 1120. Previous NMHU ENGL 381.

ENGL 4000. Creative Writing: Experimental Fiction (3); Alt, Sp, Odd
Advanced fiction writing with an emphasis on experimental techniques, styles, and approaches, including stream-of-consciousness and fictive-autobiography. The reading component of this course will include theoretical and creative texts. May be repeated with change of content. Prerequisite: ENGL 1120. Previous NMHU ENGL 400.

ENGL 4010. Creative Writing: Advanced Poetry (3); Alt, Fa, Even
A writing workshop for experienced poets. Students will write original poems and read 20th century poetry and poetics from the United States and around the world. May be repeated with change of content. Prerequisite: ENGL 1120. Previous NMHU ENGL 401.

ENGL 4050. Gender and the Politics of Literacy (3); Var
This course explores the historical connections between literacy on the one hand and reason/emotion on the other, focusing on how each has been historically gendered. The course begins with a history of style and how metaphors of gender have been used to describe writing. It continues with a gendered study of how cultural beliefs about literacy shape our conceptions of the individual, citizen, aesthetic, and rationality. Prerequisite: ENGL 1120. Previous NMHU ENGL 405.

ENGL 4100. Creative Nonfiction (3); Var
This course is a writing workshop that provides the background, theories, and methods for students to produce original creative nonfiction writing. The course emphasizes forms and practices of various sub-genres of creative nonfiction including the personal essay, the memoir, literary reportage, and the nonfiction novel. Prerequisites: ENGL 1120

ENGL 4110. Major American Writers (3); Sp
In-depth study of a major author or authors, school, genre, and tradition in American literature. Possible topics: literature of the American West; American modernism; American poetry. May be repeated with change of content. Prerequisite: Junior classification. Previous NMHU ENGL 411.

ENGL 4120. Major British Writers (3); Sp
In-depth study of a major author or authors, school, genre, or tradition of British literature. Possible topics: Byron and the Satanic School, The British moderns (Lawrence, Woolf, Joyce). May be repeated with change of content. Prerequisite: Junior classification. Previous NMHU ENGL 412.

ENGL 4130. Major World Writers (3); Var
In-depth study of a major author or authors, school, genre, or tradition of world literature, generally excluding British and American works. May be repeated with change of content. Possible topics: Kafka and the Kafkaesque, Ancient Erotic Literature, Post-Colonial African Fiction, The Epic. May be repeated with change of content. Prerequisite: Junior classification. Previous NMHU ENGL 413.

ENGL 4140. Literary Realism (3); Var
Covers the international development of the theory and practice of the realist novel. Prerequisite: Junior classification. Previous NMHU ENGL 414.

ENGL 4210. Chaucer (3); Var
This course is an intensive study of The Canterbury Tales and selected minor works. Prerequisite: Junior classification. Previous NMHU ENGL 421.

ENGL 4220. Shakespeare (3); Fa
This course is an intensive study of a group of Shakespeare’s plays, such as comedies, tragedies, Greek plays, English history plays, or late romances. May be repeated with a change of content. Prerequisite: Junior classification. Previous NMHU ENGL 422.

ENGL 4230. Milton (3); Var
This course is an intensive study of Paradise Lost and selected minor works. Prerequisite: Junior classification. Previous NMHU ENGL 423.

ENGL 4340. Practicum (1-4 VC); Var
Students gain practical knowledge in such areas as tutoring, editing, public relations, and feature writing. Prerequisite: Junior classification. Previous NMHU ENGL 434.

ENGL 4410. History of the English Language (3); Sp
Investigation of the origin of modern English, with a study of the evolution of English sounds, inflections, vocabulary, and syntax, from earliest times to the present. Prerequisite: Junior classification. Previous NMHU ENGL 441.

ENGL 4420. Contemporary English Linguistics (3); Var
An examination of the structures, processes, and functions of elements of the English language, with particular attention to their description in the theories of cognitive grammar. Previous NMHU ENGL 442.

ENGL 4430. Sociolinguistics (3); Alt, Sp, Odd
This course is an examination of language use and variation. Topics to be addressed include sociolinguistic theory, research methods and application; diglossia and multilingualism; pidgins and creoles; patterns of discourse; forms of addresses and reference; sociolinguistics of writing. Prerequisites: Junior classification and ENGL 3170. Previous NMHU ENGL 443.

ENGL 4450. Cultural Criticism and Theory (3); Var
Selections from advanced cultural criticism from the Birmingham school and its contemporary derivatives. Authors to be studied will include Foucault, Hall, Hebdige, Barthes, and others. Emphasis will be on the study contemporary culture from a theoretical perspective. Prerequisite: Junior classification. Previous NMHU ENGL 445.

ENGL 4500. Seminar in English (1-4 VC); Var
Seminar course in a topic or topics in English. Possible topics: literature of exploration, existentialism, literature and the law. Prerequisite: Junior classification. Previous NMHU ENGL 450.

ENGL 4630. Rhetoric and Reality (3); Var
A survey of rhetorical writings and theory from classical times to the present. Prerequisite: Junior classification. Previous NMHU ENGL 463.

ENGL 4640. Women and Rhetoric (3); Var
Provides a historical and thematic overview of rhetorical writings by and about women. Prerequisite: Junior classification. Previous NMHU ENGL 464.

ENGL 4820. Literature of the Southwest (3); Var
An examination of the tricultural literary heritage of the southwestern United States. Readings include journals and diaries of the Territorial Period as well as imaginative works by novelists of the Southwest. Emphasis on cultural traditions that shaped the literature. Prerequisite: Junior classification. Previous NMHU ENGL 482.

ENGL 4850. Stylistics (3); Var
An examination of linguistic principles specifically as they apply to the analysis of written texts. Students will learn to make the kind of textual observations needed to reveal the stylistic traits and tendencies in the language of literature. Prerequisite: Junior classification. Previous NMHU ENGL 485.

ENGL 4900. Senior Readings (1-4 VC); Var
Primarily intended for English majors. Individual study of selected author(s) or topic(s) arranged with an instructor. Prerequisites: Junior classification and permission of instructor. Previous NMHU ENGL 490.

ENGL 4910. Arthurian Literature (3); Var
This course examines literature generated by the legends of King Arthur and his court, studied in a variety of European texts from the Middle Ages. Prerequisite: Junior classification. Previous NMHU ENGL 491.

ENGL 4990. Supervised Research (1-4 VC); Var
Primarily intended for English majors. Individual research project arranged with an instructor. Prerequisites: Junior classification and permission of instructor. Previous NMHU ENGL 499.

Philosophy (PHIL), Courses in
PHIL 1115. Introduction to Philosophy (3); Var
In this course, students will be introduced to some of the key questions of philosophy through the study of classical and contemporary thinkers. Some of the questions students might consider are: Do we have free will? What is knowledge? What is the mind? What are our moral obligations to others? Students will engage with and learn to critically assess various philosophical approaches to such questions. Previous NMHU PHIL 100.

PHIL 1120. Logic, Reasoning, and Critical Thinking (3); Var
The purpose of this course is to teach students how to analyze, critique, and construct arguments. The course includes an introductory survey of important logical concepts and tools needed for argument analysis. These concepts and tools will be use to examine select philosophical and scholarly texts. Previous NMHU PHIL 211.

PHIL 2001. Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (3); Var
A survey of ancient and medieval philosophy including but not limited to the Pre-Socratics, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, and Aquinas. Previous NMHU PHIL 201.

PHIL 2003. Modern Philosophy (3); Var
Survey of the philosophies of Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. Previous NMHU PHIL 203.

 

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This major is under the College of Arts and Sciences