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Department of Natural Resources Management

 

Dr. Joshua L. Sloan, Department Chair and Assistant Professor of Forestry,
Ivan Hilton Science Center, Room 335
Phone: 505-454-3208  Fax: 505-454-3103
E-mail: jlsloan@nmhu.edu


The Natural Resources Management (NRM) Department includes the disciplines of Environmental Geology, Forestry, and Conservation Management that work collaboratively to provide opportunities for students to obtain an exceptional education in natural resources management. Areas of study focus on the management of natural resources, with an emphasis on integrating knowledge from fields of earth science, ecology, economics, social science, and public policy to understand, evaluate, and provide sustainable solutions for multi-dimensional resource management problems across spatial and temporal scales. The NRM Department offers instructional programs leading to a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) in Conservation Management and Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degrees in Environmental Geology and Forestry. The NMHU Forestry program is provisionally accredited by the Society of American Foresters and is the only accredited Forestry program in the State of New Mexico. Various concentrations and minors are offered within these programs. The Natural Resources Management Department also offers a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) minor and a GIS undergraduate certificate.



Mission of the Department of Natural Resources Management

The mission of the NRM Department academic programs is to provide students with a solid understanding of the natural environment and to improve the utilization and stewardship of land, water, and forest resources. The allied degree programs in Conservation Management, Environmental Geology, and Forestry offer high quality instruction that includes hands-on learning, field immersion, and laboratory experience. Both the Environmental Geology and Forestry degrees instill scientific and technical backgrounds that empower students to successfully pursue science and technology careers or proceed to advanced graduate studies. The NRM professors strive to make each student’s educational experience challenging and rewarding.


Faculty:

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Conservation Management (BA)

Conservation Management provides students with skills to integrate the diverse array of social, political, legal, institutional, cultural, economic, ecological, and biophysical considerations inherent in attaining environmental and resource management goals.  This degree prepares students for a variety of careers in research, industry, education, government, or public service. Students must complete a total of 43 to 46 hours in anthropology, biology, chemistry, forestry, and geology. The University requires at least 45 credit hours in upper (300-400 level) courses. The BA in Conservation Management requires a minor.

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Environmental Geology (BS)

Environmental Geology is an interdisciplinary major concerned with the practical application of the principles of geology in the solving of environmental problems. Environmental Geology deals with earth resources, geologic hazards, and the interaction of humans with the environment. Courses are designed to provide students with scientific knowledge, mathematical proficiency, research skills, technical abilities, and writing competencies to launch exciting and rewarding careers in the geosciences. The Environmental Geology B.S. offers three concentrations of study – Environmental Science, Geology, and Water Resources. The concentrations share a core set of chemistry, math, and physics foundational courses after which students focus on a series of upper-division courses in their intended concentration. In each concentration, students master content knowledge in basic areas of geology (earth materials, geologic hazards, and environmental law and policy), critical and reflective thinking skills, effective use of technology, and effective written and oral communication skills. All three degree tracks offer field study, laboratory experience, independent research, and elective coursework. Environmental Geology students are not required to take a minor, but those concentrating in Geology are required to take a summer field course (GEOL 375) prior to graduation. Graduates of the Environmental Geology program have excellent career opportunities in water, mineral, and energy resource exploration, resource recovery, resource management, water minimization, pollution prevention, contamination remediation, and environmental protection.

The Environmental Science concentration focuses on the application of geologic, physical, biological, and chemical principles to the study of the physical environmental and the solution of a wide range of environment problems. The Environmental Science degree track is deliberately designed to be sufficiently flexible to allow students, with close guidance from a faculty adviser, to design a major program, emphasizing a variety of specific approaches to studying earth’s environment, based on a firm foundation of supporting sciences and ending with a project-oriented capstone course. The Geology concentration is designed to provide quantitative preparation for career pathways involving interdisciplinary study of the environment, with a geological emphasis. It highlights those subjects that are most relevant to society, including hydrology, geomorphology, earth materials, geochemistry, and soil science, as well as the tools and techniques for environmental geology study. The Water Resources concentration is designed to provide disciplinary and interdisciplinary preparation for positions in industries or agencies requiring diversified experience in water science and management. Coursework emphasizes surface and ground water hydrology, water science, watershed management, watershed restoration, geochemistry, and water policy.

Career Paths | Department Faculty | Field Trips | Geology Lab Information Links | Job Listings |Salary Expectations

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Forestry (BS)

The mission of the Forestry program in the Department of Natural Resources Management is to engage in teaching, research, and service in forestry to promote the sustainable management of forest resources. The Forestry teaching program seeks to enhance the competency and excellence of the forestry profession. The undergraduate Forestry degree program is designed to educate well-rounded, technologically proficient, and ecologically aware forest managers, providing them with a background sufficient to enable them to support the continued health, integrity, and use of forests for the benefit of society. Being part of a Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI), the Forestry program seeks to address the needs of underrepresented students in the forestry profession.

Forestry is the application of scientific principles to the sustainable management of forest resources, including a wide range of ecosystem services (e.g., non-timber forest products, wildlife, medicinal herbs, and craft materials), fresh water, and biodiversity. The primary goal of the forestry program is to train technically competent forest and natural resources managers who understand the ecological notions that underpin human use of forest resources. Graduates of the Forestry Program meet all federal requirements for employment as a professional forester. Students receive training in the various techniques used to determine resource quantities and qualities, economic values, and social constraints in the management of natural resources. Students who major in forestry are not required to take a minor. A summer field course is required of all students prior to their graduation. Students who wish to pursue graduate degrees should talk to an adviser about recommended coursework.

The BS in Forestry offers two concentrations of study – Forestry Management and Wildland Fire. The Forestry Management concentration focuses on the management of timber as well as a wide range of ecosystem services produced by private and public lands. The Wildland Fire program, one of the few in the country, offers state of the art instruction in the use and management of fire on the broad landscapes of the west. In this era of rapid environmental change, these forestry fields are in increasing demand. After graduation, New Mexico Highlands University forestry students are prepared to meet that demand and embark on exciting and rewarding careers. The NMHU Forestry Program is provisionally accredited by the Society of American Foresters.

Placement Rates of NMHU Forestry Graduates*

Academicyear PlacementRate Employers
2013/2014 86%
  • USDA-Forest Service
  • USDI-BLM,
  • USDI-BIA,
  • Graduate School

2012/2013 100%
  • USDA-Forest Service
  • Graduate School

2011/2012 86%
  • USDA-Forest Service
  • Graduate School

2010/2011 67%
  • USDA-Forest Service
  • NMFWI

2009/2010 100%
  • USDA-Forest Service
  • NM Forestry division,
  • USDI-BLM

2008/2009 100%
  • USDA-Forest Service
  • Graduate School

2007/2008 83%
  • USDA-Forest Service,
  • NM Forestry division
  • NM State Parks
  • USDI- National park Service

2006/2007 100%
  • USDA-Forest Service

*Placement of graduates in professional Natural resources positions or admitted to graduate school.

Accredited by the Society of American Foresters

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Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Programs

GIS is a computer-based database management system for capture, storage, retrieval, analysis and display of spatial data. The GIS minor and certificate program provide students with a basic proficiency with cutting edge GIS technology that can immediately be applied in the workplace, a highly marketable skill-base when seeking employment, and/or skills for pursuing an advanced degree in GIS. The GIS minor consist of 21-22 credit hours and the GIS certificate program requires 17-19 credit hours. Both programs afford students with a conceptual base and technical skills in using a desktop GIS and applying GIS across disciplines to solve real-world problems. Each GIS option includes 5 geology courses and an additional geology upper-division elective. Students who complete the GIS minor or GIS certificate program are prepared to map data for decision-making in business, environmental protection, risk assessment, utility planning and management, emergency response, land use planning, transportation planning, delivery route planning, real estate, crime prevention, and other areas.

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Resources and Facilities

The Department of Natural Sciences is housed in the Ivan Hilton Science and Technology Building. Modern classrooms and spacious laboratories showcase state-of-the-art analytical equipment and modern safety features and provide students with hands-on, student-centered learning environments.

For more information about our research facilities click here.

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Natural Resources Management

Major in Conservation Management (BA)

CORE: 34 credit hours

FORS 1010 Ecosystems and Humans (4)
FORS 2110 Terrestrial Ecology (4)
FORS 2120 Water Resources (3)
FORS 3050 Natural Resources Economics (3)
FORS 3300 Natural Resources Law and Policy (3) OR GEOL 412 Geologic Resources, Law and Environmental Policy (3)
FORS 3400 Quantitative Methods (3)
FORS 4120 Survey and GIS (4)
FORS 4260 Professional Ethics (1)
BIOL 2120 General Biology (4)
CHEM 1215 General Chemistry (3)
CHEM 1215L General Chemistry Lab (2)

Electives: 9-12 credit hours
Upper-division electives from forestry, geology, biology or anthropology chosen in consultation with your adviser.

Major Total: 43 – 46 credit hours
Core Requirements: 21 credit hours
Flex Requirements: 10 credit hours
Extended Requirements: 8 credit hours
Proficiency Requirements: 11-17 credit hours
General Electives to 120 (if needed): 4-7 credit hours
Minor: 20 credit hours minimum

Total for degree: 120 credit hours*

*A minor is required.  The number of proficiency credit requirements will vary based on student placement scores. The University requires a minimum of 45 upper division units for the degree.

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Major in Environmental Geology (BS)

Concentration in Geology

Required Core: 48 credit hours

GEOL 1110 Physical Geology (4)
GEOL 2110 Historical Geology (4)
GEOL 3010 Environmental Geology (4)
GEOL 3170 Depositional Environments (4)
GEOL 3250 Earth Materials (4)
GEOL 3300 Structural Geology (4)

FORS 3400 Quantitative Methods (3)

OR

MATH 3450 Mathematical Statistics

 

GEOL 3750 Field Geology (4)
FORS 4120 Surveying and GIS (4)
GEOL 4210 Environmental Ground Water Hydrology (4)
GEOL 4320 Environmental Geochemistry (4)
GEOL 4250 Geomorphology (4)
GEOL 4950 Senior Geology Applications (1)

Additional requirements: 26 – 28 credit hours

MATH 1510 Calculus 1 (4)
MATH 1440 Calculus 2 (4)
CHEM 1215 General Chemistry 1for STEM Majors (3)
CHEM 1215L Chemistry Lab 1 for STEM Majors (2) 

Choose one of the following:

PHYS 1230 Algebra-based Physics 1 (4)

OR

PHYS 1310 Calculus-based Physics 1 (5)

 Choose one of the following:

PHYS 1240 Algebra-based Physics 2 (4)

OR

PHYS 1320 Calculus-based Physics 2 (5)

OR

GEOL 4240 Environmental Geophysics (4)

 

Electives:  > 5 upper division credit hours
With the advice and consent of an adviser, students take > 5 upper division credit hours in geology, math, or an approved science discipline.

Major Total:  74-76 credits hours
Core Requirements: 21 credit hours
Flex Requirements: 10 credit hours
Extended Requirements: 8 credit hours
Proficiency Requirements: 11-17 credit hours

Total for degree: 124-132 credit hours*

*A minor is not required. The number of proficiency credit requirements will vary based on student placement scores. The University requires a minimum of 45 upper-division units for the degree.

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Concentration in Water Resources

Required Courses: 53 credit hours

GEOL 1110 Survey of Earth Science (4)
BIOL 2110 Principles of Biology: Cellular and Molecular Biology (4)

OR

FORS 2110 Terrestrial Ecology (4)

GEOL 3010 Environmental Geology (4)

FORS 3400 Quantitative Methods (3)

OR

MATH 3450 Math Statistics (3)

GEOL 4120 Geol Resources, Law & Env Policy (3)

OR

FORS 3150 Natural Resources Law & Policy (3)

 

FORS 4080 Limnology (4)
FORS 4120 Survey and Geographic Information Systems (4)
FORS 4170 Watershed Management (3)
GEOL 4150 Remote Sensing and Analysis (4)
GEOL 4210 Environmental Ground Water Hydrology (4)
GEOL 4250 Geomorphology (4)
GEOL 4320 Environmental Geochemistry (4)
FORS 4330 Water Science
FORS 4530 Toxicology in Life Science (3)
GEOL 4950 Senior Geology Applications (1)

Additional requirements: –17-18 credit hours

MATH 1510 Calculus 1 (4)
MATH 1440 Calculus 2 (4)
CHEM 1215 General Chemistry 1 for STEM Majors (3)
CHEM 1215L Chemistry Lab 1 for STEM Majors (2)

 Choose one:

PHYS 1230 Algebra-based Physics 1 (4)

OR

PHYS 1310 Calculus-based Physics 1 (5)

 

Major total: 70-76 credit hours
Core Requirements: 21 credit hours
Flex Requirements: 10 credit hours
Extended Requirements: 8 credit hours
Proficiency Requirements: 11-17 credit hours
Total for degree: 120-132 credit hours*

*A minor is not required. The number of proficiency credit requirements will vary based on student placement scores. The University requires a minimum of 45 upper-division units for the degree.

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Concentration in Environmental Science

Required Courses: 19 credit hours

GEOL 1110 Survey of Earth Science (4)

FORS 1010 Ecosystems and Humans (4)

OR

BIOL 2110 Principles of Biology: Cellular and Molecular Biology

GEOL 3010 Environmental Geology (4)

FORS 3400 Quantitative Methods (3)

OR

MATH 3450 Mathematical Statistics (3)

FORS 3300 Natural Resources Law/Policy (3)

OR

GEOL 4120 Geologic Resources, Law and Environmental Policy (3)

FORS/GEOL 4950 Senior Geology Applications (1)

Additional Science Requirements: 20-23 credit hours

BIOL 2110 Principles of Biology: Cellular and Molecular Biology (4)

OR

FORS 2110 Terrestrial Ecology (3)

MATH 1510 Calculus 1 (4)

PHYS 1230 Algebra-based Physics I (4)

OR

PHYS 1310 Calculus-based Physics I (5)

CHEM 1215 General Chemistry I for STEM Majors (3)
CHEM 1215L General Chemistry I Lab for STEM MAJORS (2)

One additional foundational science or MATH course. (4)

Electives: 34 upper-division credits
With the advice and consent of an advisor, students take a minimum of 34 upper division credits in geology, math, or an approved allied discipline.  Note: Students planning to continue on to graduate school are strongly encouraged to take GEOL 3750 Field Geology as this is a required class in many graduate programs.

Major totals: 73-76 credit hours
Core Requirements: 21 credit hours
Flex Requirements: 10 credit hours
Extended Requirements: 8 credit hours
Proficiency Requirements: 11-17 credit hours

Total for degree: 123- 132 credit hours

*A minor is not required. Additional credit hours may exceed the total degree credit requirement if proficiency courses are required. The University requires a minimum of 45 upper-division units for the degree.

 

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Major in Forestry (BS)

Concentration in Forestry Management

Required Courses: 54 credit hours

FORS 1010 Ecosystems and Humans (4)
FORS 2990 Forestry Field Practice (4)
FORS 2110 Terrestrial Ecology (4)
FORS 2120 Water Resources (3)
FORS 3050 Natural Resources Economics (3)
FORS 3070 Wildland Fire Management (3)
FORS 3100 Mensuration and Biometrics (3)
FORS 3130 Dendrology (3)
FORS 3300 Natural Resources Law and Policy (3)

OR

GEOL 4120 Geologic Resources, Law and Environmental Policy (3)
FORS 3400 Quantitative Methods (3)
FORS 4020 Silviculture (3)
FORS 4100 Forest Management (3)
FORS 4120 Surveying and Geographic Information Systems (4)
FORS 4160 Soil Science (4)
FORS 4240 Wildland Pest Management (3)
FORS 4260 Professional Ethics (1)
FORS 4920 Applied Forestry Research (3)

Additional Requirements: 16-17 credits

BIOL 3030 Plant Structure and Function (4)
CHEM 1215 General Chemistry 1 for STEM Majors (3)
CHEM 1215L Chemistry Lab 1 for STEM Majors (2)
GEOL 1110 Physical Geology (4)
MATH 1430 Applications of Calculus 1 (3)

OR

MATH 1510 Calculus 1 (4)

 

Electives: 6-8 credits hours
In consultation with academic adviser, students may choose from FORS 4000, 4080, 4170, 4180, 4200, 4330, 4510, 4520, 4530, 4560, or 4610

Major Total: 76 – 79 credit hours
Core Requirements: 21 credit hours
Flex Requirements: 10 credit hours
Extended Requirements: 8 credit hours
Proficiency Requirements: 11-17 credit hours

Total for degree: 126-135 credit hours*

*A minor is not required. Additional credit hours may be required to meet the total degree credit requirement if proficiency or other required courses are waived for content only. English and math proficiency credit do not count toward the total degree credit requirement. The University requires a minimum of 45 upper-division units for the degree.

 

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Concentration in Wildland Fire

Required Courses: 64 credit hours

FORS 1010 Ecosystems and Humans (4)
FORS 2990 Forestry Field Practice (4)
FORS 2110 Terrestrial Ecology (4)
FORS 2120 Water Resources (3)
FORS 3050 Natural Resources Economics (3)
FORS 3070 Wildland Fire Management (3)
FORS 3100 Mensuration and Biometrics (3)
FORS 3130 Dendrology (3)
FORS 3300 Natural Resources Law and Policy (3)

OR

GEOL 4120 Geologic Resources, Law and Environmental Policy (3)

FORS 3400 Quantitative Methods (3)
FORS 4020 Silviculture (3)
FORS 4100 Forest Management (3)
FORS 4120 Surveying and Geographic Information Systems (4)
FORS 4160 Soil Science (4)
FORS 4240 Wildland Pest Management (3)
FORS 4260 Professional Ethics (1)
FORS 4510 Project Fire and Rehabilitation (3)
FORS 4520 Prescribed Fire Practices (4)
FORS 4560 Fire and Landscape Ecology (3)
FORS 4920 Applied Forestry Research (3)

Additional Requirements: 16 – 17 credits

BIOL 3030 Plant Structure and Function (4)
CHEM 1215 General Chemistry 1 for STEM Majors (3)
CHEM 1215L Chemistry Lab 1 for STEM Majors (2)
GEOL 1110 Physical Geology (4)
MATH 1430 Applications of Calculus 1 (3)

OR

MATH 1510 Calculus 1 (4)

Electives: 3-6 credits hours
In consultation with academic adviser, students may choose from FORS 4000, 4080, 4170, 4180, 4200, 4330, 4510, 4520, 4530, 4560, or 4610.

Major Total: 83-87 credit hours
Core Requirements: 21 credit hours
Flex Requirements: 10 credit hours
Extended Requirements: 8 credit hours
Proficiency Requirements: 11-17 credit hours

Total for degree: 133-143 credit hours*

*A minor is not required. The number of proficiency credit requirements will vary based on student placement scores. The University requires a minimum of 45 upper-division units for the degree.

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Minor in Environmental Science

Required Courses: 21 credit hours

FORS 4130 Environmental and Ecological Monitoring (3)
FORS 4160 Soil Science (4)
GEOL 4210 Environmental Ground-Water Hydrology (4)
FORS 4330 Water Science (4)
FORS 4530 Toxicology in Life Science (3)
FORS 4610 Atmospheric Science (3)

Minor Total: 21 credit hours

 

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Minor in Geology

Required courses: 20 credit hours

GEOL 1110 Physical Geology (4)
GEOL 2110 Historical Geology (4)
GEOL 3010 Environmental Geology (4)
GEOL 3170 Depositional Environmental (4)
GEOL 3250 Earth Materials (4)

Electives: 3 credits hours

Choose at least one additional 3/4000-level geology course for which prerequisites for that course have been satisfied.

Minor Total: 23 credit hours

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Minor in Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

Required Courses: 22 credits hours

 Choose one of the following:

GEOL 1110 Physical Geology (4)
FORS 1010 Ecosystems and Humans (4)
POLS 1120 American National Government (3)
ANTH 1140 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3)

Additional requirements:

FORS 4120 Surveying and GIS (4)
GEOL 4150 Remote Sensing and Analysis (4)
GEOL 4180 Advanced GIS (4)
GEOL 4940 GIS Capstone Seminar* (2)

Elective: 4-5 credit hours (to reach 22 credit hours)

Choose a 3000/4000-level course from geology, forestry, political science, or anthropology.

Minor Total: 22 credits hours

*This class (existing course or selected topic) is an elective within the GIS program that varies by discipline. The course fulfills the minor degree requirement as determined by the student’s faculty adviser.

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Minor in Wildland Fire

Required Courses: 18 credit hours

FORS 1010 Ecosystems and Humans (4)*
FORS 2110 Terrestrial Ecology (4)*
FORS 3070 Wildland Fire Management (3)
FORS 4560 Fire and Landscape Ecology (3) 

*Select an additional elective for each if course is used for the major.

Choose one:

FORS 4510 Project Fires and Post-Fire Rehabilitation (3)
FORS 4520 Prescribed Fire Practices (4)

 

Electives: 1 – 9 depending on major*

*Choose electives in consultation with minor adviser.

Minor Total: 18 credits hours

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Minor in Wildlife Management

Required Courses: 18 credit hours

FORS 1010 Ecosystems and Humans (4)*
FORS 2110 Terrestrial Ecology (4)*
FORS 3170 Principles of Wildlife Management (3)
FORS 4200 Wildlife Habitat Management (3)
BIOL 4940 Field Zoology (3)

 

*Select an additional elective for each if course is used for the major.

Electives: 1 – 9 depending on major*

*Choose electives in consultation with minor adviser.

Minor Total: 18 credits hour

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GIS Certificate

Required Courses: 18 credit hours

Choose one of the following:

GEOL 1110 Physical Geology (4)
FORS 1010 Ecosystems and Humans (4)
POLS 1120 American National Government (3)
ANTH 1140 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3)

Additional requirements:
FORS 4120 Intro to GIS Surveying (4)
GEOL 4150 Remote Sensing and Analysis (4)
GEOL 4180 Advanced GIS (4)
GEOL 4940 GIS Capstone Seminar (2)

Certificate Total: 18 credit hours

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Forestry (FORS), Courses in

FORS 1010. Ecosystems and Humans (4); 3, 2 Fa, Sp
A survey of environmental and ecological sciences with an introduction to the ways humans interact with and change ecosystems. The course introduces students to ecological and environmental concepts that bear on environmental issues, the current practices and management strategies utilized to preserve and sustain ecosystems, and examples of solutions to environmental and natural resources problems. Previous NMHU FOR 105. 

FORS 1350-4350. Selected Topic in Forestry (1-4 VC); Var
Course in a topic or topics in forestry. May be repeated with a change in course content. Previous NMHU FOR 135-435. 

FORS 2110. Terrestrial Ecology (4); 3, 2 Fa
The ecology of natural and artificial groups of terrestrial organisms used in the production of goods and services is the focus of this course. Topics include biological productivity, vegetation dynamics, biodiversity, range ecosystems, forest ecosystems, and pest populations. Prerequisite: FORS 1010. Previous NMHU FOR 231. 

FOR 2120. Water Resources (3); Fa, Sp
This course will explore the social, economic, environmental, historical, and technological forces that have led to our current methods of water distribution, management, and policy throughout the world. A strong historical context will be used throughout the course with a focus on New Mexico, Colorado, and the West. While the course will focus on the West, other areas of the U.S. and world will be examined as appropriate. Prerequisite: FORS 1010 or instructor permission. Previous NMHU FOR 237. 

FORS 2900-4900. Independent Study (1-6 VC); Fa, Sp, Su
Individual directed study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU FOR 290-490. 

FORS 2990. Forestry Field Practices (4); 1, 6 Fa
This course is an intensive summer experience in which various forest types in New Mexico are visited. Forest management practices, harvest systems, and natural catastrophes will be assessed by students for their ecological repercussions. Measurement methods used in forestry will be introduced throughout the session. This course provides training to students in the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s heavy equipment and field operations regulations, safe practices for field workers, and risk management and liability issues surrounding field work. Previous NMHU FOR 200. 

FORS 3050. Natural Resources Economics (3); Sp
This course provides an overview of the market economy in development and allocation of scarce resources, the economic impacts of policy measures used in natural resource systems, and the achievement of achieving environmental goals. Prerequisites: FORS 2110 and ECON 2120. Previous NMHU FOR 305. 

FORS 3070. Wildland Fire Management (3); Fa
This is a course on the behavior of wildfires in forest and range communities. Methods of prescribed fire use are discussed. This course reviews methods for fuel load estimation, fire weather prediction, and fire suppression. Prerequisite: FORS 3210 or instructor permission. Previous NMHU FOR 307. 

FORS 3100. Mensuration and Biometrics (3); Fa
Mensuration is the practice of measuring lengths and angles. Biometrics is the set of techniques for measurement and analysis of biological phenomena. Together, these topics provide a comprehensive overview of measurement and analysis techniques used in life science and allied disciplines. Prerequisite or Corequisite: MATH 1220. Previous NMHU FOR 310. 

FORS 3130. Dendrology (3); Fa
Dendrology studies the biology of trees and woody vegetation. This course explores tree and shrub identification with associated botanical nomenclature as well as the structure and function of shrub and tree morphology. A collection of local trees and shrubs is a requirement for the course. Prerequisite: FORS 2110 or instructor permission. Previous NMHU FOR 313. 

FORS 3170. Principles of Wildlife Management (3); Fa
This course will provide an overview of ecological principles used in the management of various groups of wildlife, the history and development of wildlife management as a science, characteristics of, and factors affecting wildlife populations, techniques and theories of management, and wildlife conservation. Prerequisites: FORS 1010 and FORS 2110. Previous NMHU FOR 317. 

FORS 3300. Natural Resources Law and Policy (3); Fa
Natural resources and environmental ethics doctrines and applications with regard to laws and policies are examined. Introduction to laws, regulations, and policies that focus on natural and environmental concerns are the focus of this course. Previous NMHU FOR 330. 

FORS 3400. Quantitative Methods (3); Fa, Sp
Quantitative methods are the techniques used to numerically and statistically analyze observational and experimental data. Students will gain first-hand experience with data analysis of biological, geological, and natural resources data sets. Prerequisite or Corequisite: MATH 1220 or instructor permission. Previous NMHU FOR 340. 

FORS 4000. Surface Hydrology (3); Alt, Sp, Even
A course designed for upper-division undergraduate students in earth sciences and natural resources management. The course combines 1) a qualitative conceptual understanding of hydrologic process, 2) an introduction to the quantitative representation of those processes, and 3) an understanding of approaches to hydrological measurements and the uncertainties involved in those measurements. Prerequisite: GEOL 1110, MATH 1220, or instructor permission. Previous NMHU FOR 400. 

FORS 4020. Silviculture (3); Sp
Silviculture is the set of practices to grow and manage trees. The course focuses on the factors affecting tree growth, tree stand dynamics and health, and the impact of management on ecosystem values. The ecological practices to sustainably produce forest products are emphasized. Prerequisite: FORS 2110 or instructor permission. Previous NMHU FOR 402. 

FORS 4080. Limnology (4); 3, 1 Alt, Fa, Even
A study of the interrelationships among plants, animals, and environmental factors in aquatic ecosystems. The course is field oriented and concentrates on the development of sampling techniques and the analysis of biotic and abiotic components of nearby lakes and streams. Prerequisite: FORS 2120, CHEM 1215 and MATH 1220, or instructor permission. Previous NMHU FOR 408. 

FORS 4100. Forest Management (3); Fa
This course focuses on the economic and scientific decisions for large tracts of land and multiple types of forest stands over landscapes. The elements of planning management activities to create the least costs and greatest benefits for a landowner are explored. Prerequisites: FORS 1010, FORS 2110 and MATH 1220, or instructor permission. Previous NMHU FOR 410. 

FORS 4120. Surveying and Geographic Information Systems (4); 3, 2 Fa, Sp
The training and application of surveying and GIS databases to environmental and natural resources problems. Prerequisites: MATH 1220 with a minimum grade of C or instructor permission. Previous NMHU FOR 412. 

FORS 4130. Ecological and Environmental Monitoring (3)
Monitoring is the observation of treatment effects or the condition of natural and human systems over time. Many systems are monitored for pollutants and regulatory compliance, adverse outcomes of environmental management practices, and to determine trends in animal and plant populations. The course explores 1) roles of monitoring in environmental management and ecology; 2) considerations in designing monitoring programs; 3) sampling methodologies for soil conditions, water quality, animal and plant populations, and responses to treatments; and 4) uses of monitoring results. Prerequisites: CHEM 1225, and MATH 1220. Previous NMHU FOR 413. 

FORS 4160. Soil Science (4); 3, 2 Fa
This course provides students with basic soil science concepts. The physical, chemical and ecological properties of soils are applied to soil classification, genesis, fertility, productivity, irrigation and erosion. Prerequisites: BIOL 2120, CHEM 1215 and MATH 1220. Previous NMHU FOR 416. 

FORS 4170. Watershed Management (3)
This course will emphasize the interdisciplinary characteristics of watershed management. The need to incorporate ecological and socioeconomic factors when planning and implementing programs to achieve sustainable, socially viable natural resource development is emphasized. Prerequisites: FORS 2110 and FORS 3300 or instructor permission. Previous NMHU FOR 417. 

FORS 4180. Aquatic Ecology (4); 3, 2 Alt, Fa, Odd
This course examines the biological, chemical, and physical features of aquatic environments and relates them to general ecological concepts and environmental concerns. The course focuses on the physiological adaptations of species to the aquatic environment and invertebrate and fish community structure. Additionally, this course will examine both the negative and positive impacts that anthropogenic activities have on the ecology of aquatic systems. Prerequisites: BIOL 2120, CHEM 1215, and MATH 1220. Previous NMHU FOR 418. 

FORS 4200. Wildlife Habitat Management (3); Alt, Sp, Even
This course examines the principles and practice of wildlife management with an emphasis on habitats, distribution, abundance and legal considerations. Prerequisite: FORS 2110. Previous NMHU FOR 420. 

FORS 4240. Wildland Pest Management (3); 3, 2 Sp

A pest is an organism that interferes with human activities. Pests annually cause large losses of food and wood, as well as damage to infrastructure and ecosystem services. This course explores major wildland pest organisms, and practices for management of their populations. Students will learn about management practices for insect, weed, pathogen and vertebrate animal pests, such as integrated pest management, cultural management, pesticide use, and biological control. Prerequisites: CHEM 1215 and FORS 2110. Previous NMHU FOR 424. 

FORS 4260. Professional Ethics (1); Sp
Natural and environmental resources professionals may work for public agencies, wood products corporations, consulting firms, or private contractors. Professional ethics is the set of decision guidelines for dealing with various landowners, the conduct of professional and business activities, and the conservation of resources for future generations. This course explores common ethical issues for natural resources professionals. Prerequisite: FORS 1010. Previous NMHU FOR 426. 

FORS 4330. Water Science (4); 3, 2 Var
This is a course focused on the standard methods of water analysis and interpretation of results for surface and ground waters, water supply systems, and wastewater discharges. The course will focus on coliform bacteria, nutrients, organic matter, heavy metals, pesticides, and water quality standards. Prerequisites: FORS 2120, CHEM 1215, and MATH 1220 or instructor permission. Previous NMHU FOR 433. 

FORS 4510. Project Fires and Post-Fire Rehabilitation (3); Var

This class is designed to investigate the potential problems resulting from fires including erosion on slopes and in stream channels, sediment and debris jams in streams, weed infestations, loss of vegetation and forest cover, hazards from fire-killed trees falling, and potential damage from post-fire activities, like salvage logging. One Saturday field trip is mandatory. Prerequisite: FORS 4050. Previous NMHU FORS 451. 

FORS 4520. Prescribed Fire Practices (4); 3, 2; Var

Prescribed fires are used to meet management objectives of fuel reduction and ecosystem restoration. This course explores the design, planning, conduct, and monitoring in prescribed fire utilization. The course includes two mandatory Saturday field trips and participation in a prescribed fire. Prerequisite: FOR 1010, FOR 3180, or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU FOR 452. 

FORS 4530. Toxicology in Life Sciences (3); Var
Students will develop an understanding of the general process of conducting release, contamination, and risk assessments. Furthermore, students will be able to understand and work with federal and state guidelines and regulations that bear on the conduct of environmental public health investigations. The ultimate goal is to equip students with knowledge and skills that are utilized to assess the general impact of substances on human health. Prerequisite: CHEM 1215 or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU FOR 453. 

FORS 4560. Fire and Landscape Ecology (3); Var

This class investigates the landscape-scale effects of wildfires, as well as the ecology of fire in a variety of ecosystems and includes the effects of fire on plants, animals, soils, water and air. The course emphasizes the prediction and characterization of fire effects over time and space as well as the role of fire in restoration ecology. Case studies of restoration projects using fire in prairies, ponderosa pine and white bark forests will be examined. Prerequisites: CHEM 1215, FOR 2110 and FOR 3070. Previous NMHU FOR 456. 

FORS 4610. Atmospheric Science (3); Var
The physical structure and dynamics of the atmosphere are explored. Air pollutant movement, dissipation, and chemistry will be discussed. Weather phenomena and local ventilation patterns will be discussed in terms and of smoke and air pollutant dispersion, fire behavior, and pesticide sprays. Prerequisites: CHEM 1215, and MATH 1220. Previous NMHU FOR 461. 

FORS 4920. Applied Forestry Research (3); Sp

This capstone course is designed for students to participate in an applied forest research project where they are required to incorporate the results of their academic preparation. Each class will pursue research toward a forest management hypothesis or question chosen by the instructor. Each student will investigate a specific issue of a broader question. Students will present their data at NMHU Research Day or a meeting of recognized scientific society. Prerequisite: Senior classification. Previous NMHU FOR 492. 

FORS 4990. Independent Research (1-6 VC); Fa, Sp, Su
Study of a special topic in natural resources management in an individual, directed research-based project arranged with an individual instructor. Instructor permission required. Previous NMHU FOR 499.

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Geology – Environmental (GEOL), Courses in

GEOL 1110. Physical Geology (4); 3, 2 Fa, Sp
Physical Geology is an introduction to our dynamic Earth introducing students to the materials that make up Earth (rocks and minerals) and the processes that create and modify the features of our planet. The course will help students learn how mountains are formed, how volcanoes erupt, where earthquakes occur, and how water, wind, and ice can shape the landscape. Students will also develop a basic understanding of the ways humans have altered the planet including our impact on natural resources and global climate change. Previous NMHU GEOL 101.

GEOL 1101. Physical Geology Laboratory (0)
Physical Geology Lab is the laboratory component of Physical Geology. Students will learn to identify rocks and minerals in hand samples, work with topographic maps, geologic maps, and geologic cross-sections, and apply stratigraphic principles to explore geologic time. 

GEOL 1005. The Planets (4); 3, 2 Var
A study of the eight planets in our solar system, with emphasis on geologic and atmospheric processes. Topics include the study of faults and tectonic features, impact craters, evolution and internal structures, atmospheres, meteorites, comets, asteroids, and analysis of spacecraft images. Applies to NM Common Core. 

GEOL 2110. Historical Geology (4); 3, 2 Sp
This course reviews the major geological and biological processes and events over the Earth’s 4.6-billion-year history. Students will learn about the formation of the Earth and its development through time including changes in the lithosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere. The interrelationships between the physical aspects of Earth history and biological origins, evolution of species, and causes of extinctions will be explored. Prerequisite: GEOL 1110.  Previous NMHU GEOL 202. 

GEOL 2350 – 4350. Selected Topic in Geology (1-4 VC); Var
Course in topic or topics in geology. May be repeated with a change in content. Previous NMHU GEOL 235-435. 

GEOL 2900 – 4900. Independent Study (1-4 VC); Fa, Sp, Su
Individual study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU GEOL 290-490. 

GEOL 3010. Environmental Geology (4); 3, 2 Sp
A study of the human interactions with the earth, its resources, and natural hazards. Includes instruction in the geological principles that can be utilized to both prevent and ameliorate environmental problems. Prerequisite: GEOL 1110. Previous NMHU GEOL 301. 

GEOL 3170. Depositional Environments (4); 3, 2 Alt, Fa, Even
Survey of sedimentary rock types, principles of description and classification, sediment genesis and transport, distribution and origin of sedimentary deposits. Includes paleoenvironmental determinations from analysis of modern marine, transitional, and continental environments with the information applied to problems in environmental geology. Course includes an investigation of evolution of life on a dynamic earth. The course will investigate stratigraphic and paleontologic principles to aid in paleoenvironmental interpretation and evolutionary studies. Students will gain an appreciation of the dynamic nature of the earth and the importance of scientific thought processes. Laboratory portion of the course emphasizes lecture topics through hands-on laboratory experiences, including several field trips. Prerequisites: GEOL 1110. Previous NMHU GEOL 317. 

GEOL 3200. Mineralogy (4); 3, 2 Var
A study of the fundamental aspects of mineralogy, including crystal symmetry, crystal structures, crystal chemistry, and the physical properties of minerals. Students will practice hand specimen identification, optical mineralogy, and powder X-ray diffractometry towards the study of elected mineral groups. Prerequisite: GEOL 1110 or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU GEOL 320. 

GEOL 3210. Petrology (4); 3, 2 Var

An introduction to the fundamentals of igneous and metamorphic rocks. The lecture will focus on the experimental and field evidence for interpreting rock associations and the interplay between igneous and metamorphic rock formation and the plate tectonic model. Topics include textures, structures, microscopic identification, geochemistry, and rock classification as a background for discussing rock origins. Prerequisite: GEOL 1110, 3200 or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU GEOL 321. 

GEOL 3250. Earth Materials (4); 3, 2 Fa
A study of the origin, identification, and significance of geologic materials and processes. The course blends basic descriptive aspects with theory and quantitative analysis. Course objectives include the following: the recognition of major rock-forming minerals and other selected minerals in hand specimen and thin section; the mastery of hand specimen and petrographic microscope analyses for mineral identification and rock interpretation; and the ability to relate crystal chemistry, crystallographic alignment, and physical attributes of a mineral to its identification, as well as rock petrogenesis. Prerequisite: GEOL 1110. Previous NMHU GEOL 325. 

GEOL 3300. Structural Geology (4); 3, 2 Alt, Fa, Odd
A detailed study of the forces acting on the earth’s crust and a resolution of these forces in terms of joints, faults, folds, uplifts, and related phenomena. Prerequisites: GEOL 1110, MATH 1220, and MATH 1250 or by permission of instructor. Previous NMHU GEOL 330. 

GEOL 3500. Seminar in Geology (3); Var
Seminar course in topic or topics in geology. Previous NMHU GEOL 350. 

GEOL 3750. Field Geology (4); 0, 12 Su
Principles of geologic mapping, including the use of a Brunton compass, barometer, hand-level, plane table, and other instruments. The course also includes the solution of actual field problems and preparation of reports. Prerequisite: GEOL 1110, 3170, 3300 or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU GEOL 375. 

GEOL 4120. Geologic Resources, Laws, and Environmental Policies (3); Alt, Sp, Even

A study of the policies that protect public and private lands and communities in from hard-rock mining impacts. The course will briefly cover the nature and origin of the earth’s rock and mineral resources, methods of resource extraction, and impacts on the environment. The course will thoroughly cover the major types of regional and federal environmental policies, discuss the roles of the major players in the public policy process, and consider how to use science to inform the debate and remediate or lessen mining impacts. The class will study the 1872 Mining Law which grants fee and open occupation, exploration, and purchase of public lands to U.S. citizens. We will also study The 1993 New Mexico Mining Act that improved regulation of mining at the state level will also be covered. Selected NM hard- rock mining cases and issues relevant to the southwest will also be reviewed. Prerequisite: GEOL 1110 or an introductory physical science laboratory course. Previous NMHU GEOL 412. 

GEOL 4150. Remote Sensing and Analysis (4); 3, 2 Fa
Instruction in remote sensing theory, applications, and case studies, and exposure to and practice with airborne and satellite remote sensing and image processing. Students will be able to acquire data, process the images, create appropriate data, analyze the accuracy of the results, and utilize the data for specific applications. Prerequisites: FOR 4120 and MATH 1220 with at least a C or better, or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU GEOL 415. 

GEOL 4180. Advanced Geographic Information Systems (4); 3, 2 Sp
A scheme of hardware, software, and procedures designed to support the capture, management, manipulation, analysis, modeling and display of spatially referenced data for solving complex planning and management problems. GIS applications in both spatial information (maps) and databases to perform analytical studies. The course will build upon knowledge and experience in GIS, gained in the introductory course to provide students with an understanding of cartographic and geodetic concepts, impacting GIS analysis, filed data collection techniques with global positioning systems and handheld computer mapping software, effective map design, and modeling topographic and statistical surfaces. Prerequisites: FOR 4120 and MATH 1220 with at least a C or better, or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU GEOL 418. 

GEOL 4210. Environmental Groundwater Hydrology (4); 3, 2 Alt, Sp, Odd
Study of the origin, movement, method of entrapment, and removal of subsurface waters. Course includes extensive discussion of problems associated with groundwater pollution and remediation. Prerequisites: GEOL 1110, MATH 1430 or MATH 1510 or previous NMHU GEOL 101, MATH 1430 or MATH 1510. Previous NMHU GEOL 421. 

GEOL 4220. Genesis and Environmental Impact of Earth’s Resources (3); Var
Study of the distribution, mineralogy, classification, modes of occurrence, and economic implications to industry and world affairs of mineral deposits. Prerequisites: GEOL 101 and 325 or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU GEOL 422. 

GEOL 4240. Environmental Geophysics (4); 3, 2 Alt, Fa, Even
Instruction in the geophysical tools, processes and concepts applied in environmental geology. Processes, e.g., volcanism, plate tectonics, mountain building, and climates, are discussed in the context of the earth and other planets. Prerequisites: GEOL 101, PHYS 1230, MATH 1250, or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU GEOL 424. 

GEOL 4250. Geomorphology (4); 3, 2 Alt, Sp, Odd
This course is an introduction to the description of landforms and landscapes on the earth’s surface. Emphasis is placed on the basic processes that govern landform evolution, human impact on land surfaces, and on the history of geomorphic study. Several field trips are required. Prerequisite: GEOL 101, GEOL 325, PHYS 1230, MATH 1250, or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU GEOL 425. 

GEOL 4320. Environmental Geochemistry (4); 3, 2 Alt, Sp, Even
A study of the chemistry of the earth, including mineral mobility, cosmochemistry, chemical weathering, digenesis, igneous and metamorphic chemistry, stable isotopes, pollution, and the thermodynamics and kinetics associated with these systems. Prerequisites: GEOL 101, CHEM 1215 and 215, MATH 1250, or by permission of instructor. Previous NMHU GEOL 432. 

GEOL 4940. GIS: Capstone Seminar (2); Fa, Sp
Individual, directed research study arranged with an instructor. Students will conduct an independent research project involving GIS and/or remote sensing analysis applied to a subject of study associated with their discipline. Each student will present a written report and applied GIS project to his or her mentor. All students will be responsible for demonstrating how GIS technology has enabled them to address a spatial problem more effectively. Prerequisites: FOR 412, GEOL 415, and GEOL 418. Previous NMHU GEOL 494. 

GEOL 4950. Senior Geology Applications (1); Fa, Sp
Required class for all graduating seniors. The purpose of the course will be is to assess the student’s understanding of environmental geology, critical thinking, and applications to geology and research methods. Assessment will consist of oral and written examinations and problem solving. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU GEOL 495. 

GEOL 4990. Independent Research in Geology (1-4 VC); Fa, Sp, Su
Individual, directed research arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU GEOL 499.

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This department is under the College of Arts and Science