Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Dr. Tom Ward
Lora Magnum Shields Science Building, Room 341
505.454.3196
FAX: 505.454.3331
E-mail: tsward@nmhu.edu

The department offers graduate programs in psychology, applied sociology public affairs, and anthropology, which also offers a postbaccalaureate certificate in cultural resource management.

Mission of the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences
The mission of the Department of Behavioral Sciences is to contribute to meeting the educational and research needs in psychology, sociology, anthropology, and the related fields; contribute to meeting the career needs in psychological and social services and social sciences, as well as contribute to training for careers in education, engineering, physical and biological sciences, medicine, and other science fields;  contribute to meeting the need for secondary school teacher certification in sociology and/or anthropology; and to provide psychological and sociocultural service and expertise for the region, as well as the greater global community.

Faculty
Erika Derkas (Sociology)
Gloria Gadsden (Sociology)
Mario Gonzales (Anthropology)
Lara Heflin (Psychology)
Jean Hill (Psychology)
Shilpashri Karbhari (Sociology)
Warren Lail (Anthropology)
Linda LaGrange (Psychology)
David Pan (Psychology)
Gerald Russell (Psychology)
Orit Tamir (Anthropology)
Thomas Ward (Sociology)
Ian Williamson (Psychology)

Resources and Facilities
The human riches of Northern New Mexico provide an outstanding context for psychological, social, and cultural studies at NMHU. Students engage in field archaeological digs, ethnographic, social and psychobiological research, and clinical practicum. Each student has the opportunity to conduct research in our psychobiology and anthropology lab. Studies of human behavior emphasize field data and computer applications for analysis and interpretation.

The department provides a computer laboratory for student use. Students have access to word processing, spreadsheets, and statistical packages as well as the Internet.
Student professional societies and organizations, such as Psi Chi, and the Sociology and Anthropology Club, provide opportunities for student participation and program enrichment beyond the classroom.

Anthropology
The graduate program in anthropology is a part of an interdisciplinary master of arts degree program in Southwest studies. This includes the disciplines of anthropology, history, and political science.

Students complete a common core of courses in Southwestern prehistory and history; social, political, and cultural dynamics; and contemporary writers. Prior to admission to the program, students select one of three areas of concentration: anthropology, history/political science (see history or political science disciplines in the Department of Humanities) or Hispanic language and literature (see languages and literature discipline in the Department of Humanities). Students interested in anthropology will follow the anthropology curriculum described below.

The master of arts program prepares students for doctoral programs in anthropology and related fields, teaching, research, and applied positions in cultural resources management, federal, state, and local agencies as well as private business and nonprofit sectors.

The institution’s geographic location in a multi-ethnic region of the Southwest provides a unique perspective for archaeological and ethnographic field experiences. The anthropology lab houses a significant collection of prehistoric and historic cultural resources for northeastern New Mexico.

Psychology
The master of science degree program in psychology offers close relationships among faculty, students, and area specialists. All graduate students perform original research for the master’s thesis with mentorship by the psychology faculty. The faculty welcomes student participation in research and activities such as attending conferences, presenting papers, and working on professional teams.

The discipline of psychology at NMHU provides well-equipped, spacious laboratories for research and observation of therapy. The presence of the state psychiatric hospital and the large number of boarding homes for the chronically mentally ill in the community provide unique opportunities for clinical training with this population.
In the recent past, approximately 40 percent of the program’s graduates have applied to Ph.D. programs, all have been accepted, and virtually all who have entered Ph.D. programs have attained the doctorate. Also, many graduates choosing service careers are successfully employed in mental health and allied agencies.

Sociology
The graduate program in sociology is part of an interdisciplinary master of arts degree program in public affairs. The program provides a comprehensive understanding of the social and cultural environment in the public and private sphere through a common core of courses taken by all students in political theory, social theory and historical thought, human culture, and economic theory. Students, prior to admission to the program, select one of the following concentrations: political and governmental processes (see political science in the Department of Humanities), or applied sociology. Students interested in sociology will follow the curriculum described below.

This program prepares students for doctoral studies and may provide enrichment for professionals in public careers such as law, politics, or government service. The program also provides advanced preparation for teachers. The interdisciplinary nature of the program is well suited to such purposes, by combining theoretical knowledge and practical methodology in historical and cross-cultural analysis; archival research; personal and participant observation, interview, and survey techniques; and statistical analysis, model-building, and simulation–applied to analysis of social and cultural trends; political and economic policy at local, regional, national, and international levels; and organizational and institutional processes.
The program’s geographic location in a multi-ethnic region of the Southwest brings unique perspectives. Field and practicum experiences are available to capitalize on the region’s rich social, cultural, and institutional resources.

Master of Arts in Public Affairs (MA)
Required core:
Choose 12 to 15 credits from the following:

ANTH 650 Seminar: Concepts of Human Culture (3)
HIST 615 Contemporary Historical Thought (3)
POLS 563 Political Economy (3)
POLS 654 Seminar: The State (3)
SOC 539 Classical Social Theories (3)
OR
SOC639 Contemporary Sociological Theory (3)
Core Total: 12 – 15 credit hours
Concentration in History
Choose 12 credits from the following:
HIST501 The Chicano Experience (3)
HIST503 Chicano Leadership (3)
HIST506 North American Frontiers (3)
HIST511 Women in the US (3)
HIST512 Civil War & Reconstruction (3)
HIST513 The US Since WWII (3)
HIST514 The American President (3)
HIST535 Selected Topics in History (3)
HIST552 New Mexico History (3)
HIST553 History of the Southwest (3)
HIST605 The Trans-Mississippi West (3)
HIST618 The Southwest (3)
HIST640 Mexico (3)
Concentration Total: 12 credit hours
Research Requirement: 3 credit hours
HIST620 Research Methods in History (3)
Thesis Option:
HIST 699 Thesis* (9)
*A minimum of nine credits is required; students must register for a least 1 credit hour per term until the thesis is completed, which may exceed the nine credit-hour minimum.
Non-Thesis Option (approval required by adviser and department chair):
Nine additional hours of coursework
Two professional papers
Degree Total: 36 credit hours minimum

Concentration in Political and Governmental Processes
Complete 12 to 15 credits from the following:
POLS502 Interest Groups (3)
POLS510 American Constitution (3)
POLS515  Government & Business (3)
POLS517 Legislative Process (3)
POLS518 Administrative Law & Procedure (3)
POLS519 Public Administration (3)
POLS533 Chinese Communist Government (3)
POLS546 Government & Politics in Latin America (3)
POLS551 Seminar: New Mexico Government & Politics (3)
POLS553 IR, Human Rights & International Law (3)
POLS558  Political Theory & Philosophy (3)
POLS560 The American & Russian Systems (3)
POLS562 International Monetary System (3)
POLS 563 Political Economy (3)
POLS 611 Seminar: Southwest Politics (3)
POLS 614 Seminar: Public Policies (3)
Concentration Total: 12-15 credit hours

Research Requirement: 3 credit hours
Choose one of the following:
POLS520 Research Methods in Political Science (3)

Thesis Option:
POLS 699 Thesis (6)
*A minimum of six credits is required; students must register for a least one credit hour per term until the thesis is completed, which may exceed the six credit-hour minimum.

Professional Paper Option:
One professional paper
POLS 520 Research Methods in Political Science
Three additional hours of coursework from the concentration area
Degree Total: 36 credit hours minimum

Concentration in Historical and Cross-Cultural Perspectives
Complete 12 to 15 credits from the following:
ANTH561 Communication and Culture (3)
HIST513 US Since WW II (3)
HIST514 American Presidency (3)
HIST640 Seminar: Mexico (3)
HIST650 Seminar: The US (3)
SPAN503 Latin American Literature: Short Story (3)
SPAN504 Latin American Literature: Novel (3)
SPAN531 Spain: Civilization & Culture (3)
SPAN532 Latin America: Civilization & Culture (3)
SPAN533 New Mexico & Southwest: Civilization & Culture (3)
SPAN650 Seminar: Spanish Southwest (3)
Concentration Total:  12-15 credit hours
Research Requirement: 3 credits
Hist 620 Research Methods in History & Political Science (3)

Thesis Option:
HIST 699 Thesis* (6)
*A minimum of six credits is required; students must register for a least one credit hour per term until the thesis is completed, which may exceed the six credit-hour minimum.

Non-Thesis Option (approval required by adviser and department chair):
Six additional hours of coursework
Two professional papers

Degree Total: 36 credit hours minimum

Master of Arts in Southwest Studies (MA)
Required core:
Choose 12 credits from the following list:
ANTH 513     Archeology of Southwest (3)
HIST 618    Seminar: The Southwest (3)
POLS 611     Seminar: Southwest Politics (3)
ANTH 576    Indians of the American Southwest (3)
OR
ANTH 577    The Hispanic Southwest (3)
Core Total: 12 credit hours

Concentration in Anthropology
Electives: 12-15 credit hours
Electives selected in consultation with graduate adviser.
Required courses: 10 credit hours
ANTH 652 Seminar: Thesis Writing (1)
ANTH 696 Ethnographic Research Methods (3)
ANTH 699 Thesis (6)*
Program Total: 37 credit hours

Applied Sociology Concentration
Required courses: 6-9 for the thesis option, 12-15 for non-thesis
SOC 530 Data Analysis (4)
SOC 539 Classical Socio Theories (3)
SOC 630 Research Methods in Sociology & Anthropology (3)
Choose one of the following, in consultation with your adviser:
SOC 699 Thesis (6)
OR
Completion of two profession papers and six additional hours of coursework
Electives 6-15 credit hours:
Select six to nine credits for thesis option, 12 to 15 credits for non-thesis option
SOC511 The Community (3)
SOC512 Social Stratification (3)
SOC515 Development & Sociocultural Change (3)
SOC527 Criminology (3)
SOC529 Gender & Society (3)
SOC534 Political Sociology (3)
SOC593 Race & Ethnic Relations (3)
POLS558 Political Theory & Philosophy (3)
POLS519 Public Administration (3)
POLS614 Seminar: Public Policies (3)
Electives selected in consultation with your graduate adviser.
Program Total: 37 credit hours

Master of Science in Psychology (MS)
Required core: 30 credit hours
PSY601 Data Analysis & Statistics (3)
PSY602 Behavioral Research Methods (3)
PSY603 Advanced Learning (3)
OR
PSY605 Memory & Cognition (3)
PSY608 Introduction to Neuropsychology (3)
PSY612 Psychopharmacology (3)
PSY621 Advanced Social Psychology (3)
PSY640 Advanced Developmental Psychology (3)
PSY651 Profession Ethics & Issues (3)
PSY671 Advanced Psychopathology (3)
PSY699 Thesis (3)*
*Students register for thesis until complete, which may exceed the 3 credit hour requirement.
Core Total: 30

General Psychology Track
Electives: 6 credit hours
In addition to the core required coursework, students in the general psychology track must also complete six credit hours of electives, including at least one assessment course (three credit hours), which are selected in consultation with an adviser. Advisers work with the student in order to structure the elective courses in accordance with the student’s career goals.
Degree Total: 36 credit hours

Clinical/Counseling Track
In addition to the core required 30 credit hours of coursework, students in the clinical psychology/counseling track must also complete the following required coursework for a total of 66 credit hours.
Required courses: 36 credit hours
PSY 525 Introduction to Group Psychotherapy (3)
PSY 627 Career Development (3)
PSY 672 Introduction to Counseling and Therapy (3)
PSY 674 Individual Intelligence Testing (3)
PSY 675 Personality Assessment (3)
PSY 677 Multicultural Psychotherapy (3)
PSY 679 Behavior Therapy & Assessment (3)
PSY 681 Neuropsychological Assessment (3)
PSY 634 Practicum (12)
Degree Total:  66 credit hours

Postbaccalaureate Certificate in Cultural Resource Management (CRM)
Required courses: 20-24 credit hours
ANTH 510 Methods and Theory in Archaeology (3)
ANTH 513 Archaeology of the Southwest (3)
ANTH 514 Field Methods in Archaeology (Field School) (2-6)
ANTH 524 Social Cultural Dynamics in the Greater Southwest (3)
ANTH 576 Indians of the American Southwest (3)
OR
ANTH 577 The Hispanic Southwest (3)
ANTH 581 Cultural Resources Management (3)
ANTH 696 Ethnographic Research Methods (3)
Chose in consultation with your adviser, three of the following courses: 9 credits
ANTH 511 Paleoethnobotany (3)
ANTH 512 Lithic Tech & Analysis (3)
ANTH 542  Forensic Anthropology (3)
GEOL512 Surveying & Geographic Information Systems (3)
Program Total: 30 credit hours minimum

Anthropology, Courses in (ANTH)

510. Methods and Theory in Archaeology (3); 2, 2
The purpose, techniques, methods and theory of archaeology in the study of the human past and in the context of modern science. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
511. Paleoethnobotany (3)
The question of subsistence is central to every archaeological inquiry. The specialized field of paleoethnobotany allows us to infer dietary habits from charred plant remains recovered during archaeological excavations. The purpose of this course, therefore, is to familiarize students with field methods employed in the recovery of botanical remains (samplings, flotation, capture, and drying) and lab methods used to identify and interpret them. Special emphasis will be placed on identifying wild and domestic plants used by prehistoric peoples of northeastern New Mexico.
512. Lithic Technology and Analysis (3)
The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the study of stone tools in archaeological contexts. We wish to learn from which materials these tools were made, the techniques that were employed to make them, how they came to be discarded to become part of the archaeological record. We also wish to know from where the materials came and what properties caused them to be selected for the purpose of purposes for which they were chose. Accordingly, the course is broken into four general areas: geology, technology, analysis, and interpretation.
513. Archaeology of the Southwest (3); 2,2
Study of prehistoric cultures (before 1500) of the American Southwest. Prerequisite: One course in introductory sociology or anthropology.
514. Field Methods in Archaeology (2 – 6 VC)
Instruction in Archeology field and laboratory techniques and methods. Prerequisite: Anth 510 or permission of instructor.
515. Development and Sociocultural Change (3)
This course concerns the nature and consequences of development and culture change. The focus is on contemporary issues and many ways in which anthropology is used outside its purely academic context: how anthropology is applied to contemporary human issues, how it benefits society, and how it advances theoretical knowledge. Prerequisite: One course in introductory sociology or anthropology. Cross-listed as SOC 515.
520. Anthropology Goes to the Movies (3)
The course features ethnographic films that explore cross-cultural themes about identities (race-ethnicity, nationality, political organization, religion, gender, class, sexuality, and so on) primarily through film and secondarily through ethnographic texts. Course readings, films, class lectures and discussions examine the themes of cinematic (visual and auditory) manipulation of audience perceptions and interpretations, research and ethics and accountabilities, and the politics of ethnographic representation. Students will learn about film in anthropology by viewing and discussing films that reflect various anthropological principles. Thinking about anthropology films will require taking and writing about the subject.
521. Ethnology (3)
An advanced study of the development of the discipline and close examination of selected ethnological texts. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
522. Religion and Culture (3)
The origins, elements, forms, and symbolism of religion including a comparative survey of religious beliefs, myths, practices, and symbolism. Course focuses on religion in the context of culture with an emphasis on appreciating religious differences. Prerequisite: One course in introductory sociology or anthropology. Cross-listed as SOC 522.
524. Social/Cultural Dynamics in the Greater Southwest (3)
Investigation of the interrelationships among the major cultural groups living in the greater Southwest today. Cross-listed as: SOC 524.
528. Comparative Systems of Social Control (3)
This course is a sociological and anthropological analysis of social control and law in a variety of social and cultural contexts.
529. Gender, Culture, and Society (3)
This course provides a foundation for understanding gender as expressed within and influenced by society. Cross culturally, men and women are perceived as different, often as opposites. This perception can affect the quality of life, both on a structural level (in terms of wages earned, jobs held) and on an interpersonal level (in terms of expression of self/autonomy). Various theoretical perspectives are explored in order to understand why this perception of difference exists, how it translates into inequality and how it is learned.
535. Selected Topics in Anthropology (1 – 4 VC)
Course in a topic or topics in anthropology: may be repeated with a change of content.
542. Forensic Anthropology (3); 2,2
Presentation and application of biological anthropology techniques in the identification of humans from skeletal remains.
554. Women and Globalization (3)
This course examines how women’s lives are shaped by globalization through the feminization of labor and migration, environmental degradation, diaspora, sexuality, cultural displacement, and militarization. It explores the ways women have confronted these conditions as well as the possibilities and challenges of cross-border feminist coalitions.
556. U.S.-Mexico Immigration: Border Issues (3)
Socially and culturally, economically and demographically no international process has affected everyday life in the United States more than Mexican immigration. The course will examine the evolution, expansion and maintenance of processes and structures that have come to institutionalize the unspoken immigration “agreements” between these two nations.
550 – 650. Seminar in Anthropology (1 – 4 VC)
Seminar course in a topic or topics in anthropology: may be repeated with change in content.
561. Communication and Culture (3)
Anthropological linguistics, focusing on investigations of the relationships between language and culture.
574. Contemporary Indian Issues (3)
An examination of emerging social and cultural issues in today’s American Indian society.
576. Indians of the American Southwest (3)
A survey of the Native American cultures in the Southwest since 1500, including both Pueblo and non-Pueblo cultures. Prerequisite: One course in introductory sociology or anthropology.
577. The Hispanic Southwest (3)
The ethnohistorical and socioanthropological examination of Spanish-speaking people in the Southwest from their establishment to contemporary times.
580. Issues in Applied Anthropology (3)
Course will focus on what applied anthropology is, how it is done, how it benefits society, and how it advances anthropology’s theoretical knowledge of culture and society. It is also a course for students who are interested in learning about the various ways in which anthropology is used outside the classroom.
581. Cultural Resource Management (3)
This course provides students with the foundations for conducting cultural resource management (CRM). It addresses laws, regulations, agencies, and techniques needed for conducting CRM work and practical experience. Prerequisite: One culture area course.
651. Concepts of Human Culture (3)
Acquaint students with the world of human cultures and to arrive at means of understanding culture as well as theoretical constructs developed to examine the central concepts of anthropology. The place of anthropology in the western tradition; issues examined by anthropologists from an array of theoretical perspectives; examples from ethnographic studies; application to public issues and policies, are means through which theory will be brought to bear on praxis.
652. Seminar: Thesis Writing (1)
Instruct and facilitate students in empirical, historical, and theoretical research and in design, preparation, and completion of thesis in anthropology.
690. Independent Study (1 – 4 VC)
Individual, directed study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
692. Independent Research (1 – 4 VC)
Independent research arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
696. Ethnographic Research Methods (3)
The course addresses methods of data collection, coding, and analysis for ethnographic field work in anthropology. Techniques include naturalistic and participant observation, structured and unstructured interviewing, field note taking and management, and other related qualitative data gathering approaches, some of which may be used in the development of quantitative instruments and analysis. Of continuing concern is the interplay between theoretical and perspectives and the influence of selected data collection methodologies.
699. Thesis (1 – 6 VC)
Individual research and writing in preparation of a graduate thesis. Prerequisite:  Permission of instructor.

Psychology (PSY), Courses in

502. Psychology of Sports Performance (3)
Psychological and social-psychological factors affecting sports performance. Specific attention will be given to the relationship between sports performance and motivation, personality, aggression, and attitudes. The social processes of social facilitation, observational learning, social reinforcement, and competition will also be viewed in relation to their effect upon the individual’s sports performance.
505. Positive Psychology (3)
This course provides an overview of the dynamic field of positive psychology. Positive psychology is oriented to the study of optimal human performance, quality relationships, well-being, and flourishing. How can we be happy? How can we enhance our own lives and the lives of others? How can we be creative, productive, satisfied, and live meaningful lives? These are a few of the questions we would like to tackle in this course.
508. Drugs and Behavior (3)
Psychological and pharmacological study of alcoholism, drug abuse, and drug use, including tranquilizers and non-prescription drugs, throughout society.
509. Domestic and Sexual Violence (3)
This course will focus on physical, sexual, and emotional abuse that occurs within families. A particular emphasis will be a focus on the psychological consequences of exposure to physical and sexual trauma and neglect. Victim and offender characteristics will be discussed in the context of family dynamics. Typical and potential criminal justice system responses will be explored.
510. Physiological Psychology (3)
An overview of the neuroanatomical and neurophysiological processes underlying behavior. Topics include neurological disorders, brain organization, sensory systems, and applied human neuropsychology. Corequisite: PSY 511.
511. Techniques in Physiological Psychology (1)
Laboratory work designed to develop skills needed to collect data in physiological psychology. Exercises include brain dissection techniques and the use of the following instruments: centrifuge, balance, spectrophotometer, and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Corequisite: PSY 510.
515. Psychology and Law (3)
This course examines the way in which psychology interacts with the law. The primary context will be the way in which psychology interacts with the criminal justice system. The course explores a variety of topics including expert testimony, civil commitment and the rights of mental patients, competency, the
insanity defense, forced medication and the transfer of mentally ill inmates to mental hospitals, and a review of the mental illnesses and personality disorders commonly encountered in criminal justice settings.
516. Motivation and Emotion (3)
A review of the major phenomena and theories that relate to motivation and emotion. Prerequisite: PSY 203, PSY 204, or permission of instructor.
519. Introduction to Behavior Therapy (3)
Introduction to and survey of behavior therapy procedures and their application to child and adult populations in a variety of settings including homes, schools, prisons, and hospitals.
522. Human Sexuality (3)
Review of contemporary, socio-psychological issues relating to human sexuality. Topics include sexual anatomy, sexually-transmitted diseases, sexual dysfunctions, sexual attitudes and mores.
525. Introduction to Group Psychotherapy (3)
An overview of group therapy, theory and techniques. Course includes an experiential component designed to provide experience with group process and group leadership. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
530. Gender Roles (3)
An examination of gender roles and role theory in understanding the behavior of women and men. Topics include development, stereotyping, sex differences in personality, abilities, achievement, and status. Attention is given to implications of changing female and male roles in society.
533. History of Psychology (3)
Review of the major figures associated with the development of psychology as a science from Plato’s time to the present, with special emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Prerequisite: PSY 203, PSY 204, or permission of instructor.
535 – 635. Selected Topic in Psy (1 – 4 VC)
Course in a topic or topics in psychology: may be repeated with a change of content.
545. Behavior Disorders in Children (3)
Etiology and treatment of behavioral problems in children in a variety of settings, including home and school environments. An eclectic coverage of the major theories, approaches, and research is provided. Prerequisite: PSY 240, PSY 340, or permission of instructor.
550 – 650. Seminar in Psychology (1 – 4 VC)
Seminar course in a topic or topics in psychology. May be repeated with a change in content.
564. Organizational Behavior (3)
Analysis of formal organizations and informal relationships among individuals and small groups. Study of business organizations as a system of authority and status, control and communication, decision-making centers, and leadership positions. Use is made of cases and research studies.
571. Psychological Testing (3); 2,2
Presentation of the principles underlying psychological testing and measurement. Major areas of psychological testing are surveyed and special attention is given to social and ethical aspects of psychological testing. Prerequisite: PSY 203, PSY 204, or permission of instructor.
572. Cognitive Science (3)
An interdisciplinary investigation of the foundations of human knowledge representation and understanding, the functioning of the human mind, and how these impact on recent computer technologies. Cross-listed as: PHIL 572 and CS 572.
575. Abnormal Psychology and Literature (3)
Characters from many literary works analyzed in terms of psychopathology. Various theories of abnormality will be utilized. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
577. Culture and Mental Illness (3)
An examination of current descriptions and explanations of mental disorders in a sample of countries from all major regions of the world. Historical, technical, ethical, and pragmatic aspects of international research in the realm of psychology/psychiatry are also addressed. Prerequisite: PSY 101, PSY 324, or permission of instructor.
579. Psychology of Religion (3)
An examination of the relationship between the discipline of psychology and religion. Perspectives addressed include the historical, cultural, philosophic, psychoanalytic, and scientific. Prerequisite: PSY 101.
580. Community Psychology (3)
An introduction to community psychology with emphasis on theories and research regarding prevention and consultation. Prerequisite: PSY 101 or permission of instructor.
590 – 690. Independent Study (1 – 4 VC)
Individual, directed readings and library research arranged with an instructor on a topic of mutual interest to the student and instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
601. Data Analysis and Statistics (3); 2, 2
A comprehensive introduction to the design, analysis, application of psychological data, and experiments. The focus of the course is on the foundation and application of statistical techniques to problems of design and analysis. An introduction to the use of SPSS to analyze data will be included. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in psychology or allied program or permission of instructor and undergraduate statistics or equivalent.
602. Behavioral Research Methods (3); 2,2
A comprehensive examination of the language and logic of psychological research. Research designs and strategies for the laboratory, existing social organizations, and field setting are covered. Prerequisite: PSY 601 or permission of instructor.
603. Advanced Learning (3)
A comprehensive examination of the basic principles of learning derived from the study of nonarticulate organisms. Both the theory and data bearing on the classical, instrumental, and operant conditioning paradigms will be examined. Other topics include avoidance, rewards, punishment, extinction, generalization, discrimination learning, and animal memory.
605. Memory and Cognition (3)
An examination of human information processing. Topics include the study of encoding, storage, and retrieval processes in memory. In addition, seminars will be conducted on selected special topics relevant to current issues in cognition, such as false memories, the nature of consciousness, and the issue of “real” versus “artificial” intelligence.
608. Introduction to Neuropsychology (3)
This course will cover a broad range of issues in the field of neuropsychology. The structural and cellular organization of the central nervous system will be reviewed followed by a discussion of the theoretical framework for brain behavior relationships. Common neurological disorders including epilepsy, degenerative diseases, traumatic brain injury, and vascular insults will be examined in detail. The test batteries and techniques typically used in neuropsychological assessment will be reviewed.
612. Psychopharmacology (3)
The course consists of the study of drug action at physiological and behavioral levels. Psychological and medical applications and limitations of drugs used in the treatment of mental illness will be covered. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
618. Experimental Models of Psychopathology (3)
Examination of laboratory-based models and theories of adaptive and mal-adaptive behavior, including the clinical applications of these models and theories.
621. Advanced Social Psychology (3)
Comprehensive review of major theories and related research in social psychology. Emphasis given to attributional and social exchange approaches.
627. Career Development (3)
An examination of theories and frameworks for career development including the major techniques and instruments used in career assessment. Attention will be given to the psychological and social factors affecting career choice, planning and development. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in psychology or allied major, permission of instructor.
630. Advanced Agency research (3); 3,0
The course provides an examination of advanced methods and strategies for research in applied settings. Topics include experimental, quasi-experimental, and small sample methodologies, survey research designs, and evaluation research approaches. Emphasis will be given to mental health practice. Ethical and professional standards for research and practice settings are covered. Prerequisites: SW 430, SW 530 and MATH 345 or PSY 302 or equivalent courses approved by instructor.
634. Practicum (1 – 12 VC)
A field placement in a local institution or agency providing extensive exposure to the use of professional techniques under staff supervision. This course may be repeated up to a limit of 12 hours of credit. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
640. Advanced Developmental Psychology (3)
An in-depth coverage of developmental theories and research across the life span.
651. Professional Ethics and Issues (3)
Examination of ethical theory as it relates to the practice of psychology. Review of the American Psychological Association Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct. Presentation of additional information relevant to the professional psychologists. Course may be repeated once for credit.
660. Multivariate Data Analysis (3)
An introduction to the role of multivariate statistical methods in behavior research, and their interpretation and conceptual understanding. Techniques covered include canonical correlation, discriminate analysis, multivariate analysis of variance, and analysis of repeated measures and principal components.
669. International Influences in Clinical Psychology (3)
A broad yet very deep survey of a variety of professional pursuits in the field of clinical psychology in the international setting. Topics addressed include international research, personality theory, clinical assessment, mental disorders, etc. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
671. Advanced Psychopathology (3)
An examination of adult psychopathology with emphasis on current research, theories, and interventions presented within the context of DSM application. A unique aspect is exposure to the shifting of paradigms from disease-centered psychiatry to the culture-based, client-centered paradigm of mental illness. Prerequisite: Graduate status in psychology or permission of instructor. Cross-listed as SW 671.
672. Introduction to Counseling and Therapy (3)
To provide the student with a relatively in-depth introduction to a number of the major psychotherapeutic approaches currently in use by practitioners. Each of the approximately 10 psychotherapies will be addressed in terms of its history, theory, and process of psychotherapy and its applications. Readings of case examples will also accompany each approach to also provide the student with an experiential dimension, so as to enable fuller integration of course material. This will be accomplished in the context of in-class “exercises,” during which students will employ the techniques theories of adaptive and mal-adaptive behavior, including the clinical applications of these models and theories.
674. Individual Intelligence Testing (3); 1,2
Theories of intelligence, administration, scoring, and interpretation of widely used individual intelligence tests. Emphasis is given to the WISC-III and WAIS-III. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
675. Personality Assessment (3); 1,2
Administration, scoring and interpretation of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI-2), Thematic Appreciation Test (TAT), and additional techniques, and integration of these findings with case history data. Prerequisites: PSY 671 and PSY 571 or PSY 674 or permission of instructor.
677. Multicultural Psychotherapy (3)
Examination and application of the American Psychological Association’s Multicultural Guidelines and the American Counseling Association’s Multicultural Competencies in therapy and counseling. Emphasis on clinical strategies for building cultural competence in working with racial/ethnic minority populations and other culturally diverse populations.
679. Behavior Therapy & Assessment (3); 1,2
Experimental and theoretical basis of behavior therapy and assessment, and issues related to their application. The course seeks to familiarize the student with current procedures and their origins in experimental psychology, to indicate strengths and limitations of these techniques and to suggest specific problem areas requiring research exploration.
681. Neuropsychological Assessment (3); 1,2
Course provides the student with a systematic clinical diagnostic procedure used to determine the extent of any possible behavioral deficits following diagnosed or suspected brain injury. Such assessments would be helpful for patients having, or suspected of having, various brain disorders that result in problems with memory, intellectual and cognitive functioning, daily activities, or behavior and emotions. Such conditions include head injury, stroke, epilepsy, brain tumor, toxic or other encephalopathies, dementia, developmental and learning disabilities, and other neurological disorders. Neuropsychological assessment would be used to determine the differential contribution of neurologic and psychiatric factors in a patient’s presenting problems, and in the specification of the patient’s psychological and behavioral strengths and weaknesses related to neurological dysfunction. Prerequisites: Psych 510 and psych 674, or equivalent courses, or permission of instructor.
691. Colloquium: Teaching of Psychology (1)
Teaching approaches and issues applicable in specified courses in psychology; designed for graduate teaching assistants in psychology. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
692. Independent Research (1 – 4 VC)
Independent research, including data collection, analysis, and interpretation, arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
699. Thesis (1 – 6 VC)
Individual research and writing in preparation of a graduate thesis. After enrolling for thesis, student must continue to enroll for at least one credit hour of thesis each semester until completed. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

Sociology (SOC), Courses in

510. Large Scale Organizations (3)
Advanced study of complex institutions and organizations.
511. The Community (3)
Analysis of human communities in terms of social structure, social class, participation in formal and informal associations, power structure, and intergroup conflict.
512. Social Stratification (3)
Differentiation, status, social mobility, class, and caste in selected societies.
515. Development and Socio-Cultural Change (3)
This course concerns the nature and consequences of development and culture change. The focus is on contemporary issues and many ways in which anthropology is used outside its purely academic context: how anthropology is applied to contemporary human issues, how it benefits society, and how it advances theoretical knowledge. Cross-listed as: ANTH 515.  Prerequisite: One course in introductory sociology or anthropology.
522. Religion and Culture (3)
The origins, elements, forms, and symbolism of religion including a comparative survey of religious beliefs, myths, practices and symbolism. Course focuses on religion in the context of culture with an emphasis on appreciating religious differences. Cross-listed as: ANTH 522. Prerequisite: One course in introductory sociology or anthropology.
524. Social/Cultural Dynamics in the Greater Southwest (3)
Investigation of the interrelationships among the major cultural groups living in the greater Southwest today.
527. Criminology (3)
An overview of definitions and types of crime, and social theories of crime causation; special issues related to crime, crime control and crime prevention.
528. Comparative Systems of Social Control (3)
This course is a sociological and anthropological analysis of social control and law in a variety of social and cultural contexts.
529. Gender, Culture, and Society (3)
This course provides a foundation for understanding gender as expressed within and influenced by society. Cross culturally, men and women are perceived as different, often as opposites. This perception can affect the quality of life, both on a structural level (in terms of wages earned, jobs held) and on an interpersonal level (in terms of expression of self/autonomy). Various theoretical perspectives are explored in order to understand why this perception of difference exists, how it translates into inequality and how it is learned.
530. Applied Social Research and Data Analysis (4) 3,2
Instruction in application of techniques used in the analysis of quantitative and qualitative social science research data.
531. Political Sociology (3)
Sociological theory and research as applied to the study of political behavior, including such topics as the social bases of power (class, occupation, religion, cultural values), decision-making, leadership and communications.
535 – 635. Selected Topics in Sociology (1 – 4 VC)
Course in topic or topics in sociology: may be repeated with a change of content.
538. Sociology of Knowledge (3)
A study of the sociocultural creation of reality and the social determination, conditioning, transmission, and distribution of knowledge in general and of ideology and science in particular.
539. Classical Sociological Theories (3)
An in-depth study of selected sociologists and their theories from the time of Comte, including such theorists as Durkheim and Weber.
550 – 650. Seminar in Sociology (1 – 4 VC)
Seminar course in a topic or topics in sociology: may be repeated with change in content.
554. Women and Globalization (3)
This course examines how women’s lives are shaped by globalization through the feminization of labor and migration, environmental degradation, diaspora, sexuality, cultural displacement, and militarization. It explores the ways women have confronted these conditions as well as the possibilities and challenges of cross-border feminist coalitions.
558. Mediation and Conflict: Interest Based Transformative and Narrative Paradigms (3)
This is a practical, interactive course offering a process of communication to manage conflict in interpersonal, organizational, and other macro-level context such as international, inter-regional, inter-local, intergovernmental and major environmental disputes both manifest and latent. Prerequisite: SOC 560 or permission of instructor.
560. Approaches to Dispute Resolution (3)
This course provides a theoretical and practical understanding of dispute resolution processes in use in the private and public sectors. The course examines how and why dispute resolution processes function in particular environments, and critiques the strengths and weaknesses of each process. Prerequisite: Introductory course in psychology or introductory course in sociology.
590–690. Independent Study (1 – 4 VC)
Independent, directed study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
593. Race and Ethnic Relations (3)
The basic processes operating in the present-day interrelations of ethnic groups.
630. Research Methods in Sociology and Anthropology (3)
Research techniques in the study of social and cultural aspects of human existence, critical study, and application of methods.
638. Advanced Classical Sociological Theories (3)
This course explores the origins and development of sociological theory through the examination of original source materials. The course is an advanced exploration of classical sociological theory designed specifically for graduate students. The student will gain an understanding of the important theoretical constructs that have shaped sociology and our understanding of society.  In addition, the student will emerge with the ability to apply these theoretical constructs to both past and current social phenomena and problems.
639. Contemporary Sociological Theories (3)
Detailed study of recent social theories with critical analysis and comparison.
692. Independent Research (1 – 4 VC)
Independent research arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
698. Field Experience (1 – 6 VC)
A field placement in a local institution or agency providing opportunity for observation and limited exposure to the use of professional techniques under staff supervision. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
699. Thesis (1 – 6 VC)
Individual research and writing in preparation of a graduate thesis. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.