Master of Science Chemistry

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY AND CHEMISTRY
Dr. David Sammeth,
Department Chair
Ivan Hilton Science Center, Room 232
505.454.3100
FAX: 505.4540.3202
E-mail: d7sammeth@nmhu.edu

Mission of the Chemistry Master’s Program
The master of science in chemistry provides training for those who wish to advance their careers in research, industry, government service or teaching. The master of science degree permits the graduate to enter the work force at a level higher than that of a BS graduate. It also prepares students for the rigors of a more advanced professional PhD program of study. Course preparation and advisement are available for students who choose to enter professional schools to study for careers in medicine, veterinary science, dentistry, pharmacy, etc.

The Chemistry Program includes the study of inorganic, analytical, physical, organic chemistry, and biochemistry, with applied emphases in medicinal and materials chemistry, reaction mechanisms, and environmental chemistry. This program requires a research project culminating in an original thesis for each student. The chemistry concentration prepares candidates for entry into the chemistry profession or for PhD work.

Resources and Facilities
The department is housed in the new Ivan Hilton Science Center. Modern laboratory research spaces with state-of-the-art safety and teaching features provide students with hands-on, student-centered learning environments. Chemical instrumentation includes a high-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer, X-ray diffraction equipment, gas and liquid chromatographs, mass spectrometers, IR, UV, and visible spectrophotometers, and laser spectroscopy facilities. Students who major in chemistry are expected to become fully competent in the use of the instruments by the time they graduate. Students gain a practical perspective on chemistry through involvement with research projects. Graduates of the program are prepared to pursue exciting careers in industry and government, or advance to doctoral studies.

Faculty
Brooks Maki (organic, natural product synthesis)
David Sammeth (physical, spectroscopy)
Lin Si (analytical, environmental)
Tatiana Timofeeva, (physical, crystallography)

Master of Science in Chemistry (MS)
Required courses: 28 credit hours
CHEM 519 Chemistry Lab 7 (3)
CHEM 541 Reaction Mechanisms (3)
CHEM 621 Advanced Analytical Chemistry (3)
CHEM 671 Chemical Thermodynamics (3)
CHEM 672 Quantum Chemistry (3)
CHEM 691 Chemistry Colloquium* (1/1)
*Taken for two semesters to equal a total of two credit hours
CHEM 699 Thesis* (8)
*A minimum of eight credits is required; students must register for a least one credit hour per term until the thesis is completed, which may exceed the eight credit hour minimum.
Choose one of the following:
CHEM561 Inorganic Chemistry 1 (3)
CHEM581 Biochemistry 1 (3)

Electives: 6 credit hours
Choose at least six credits in graduate courses from biology, chemistry, environmental science, geology, physics, or other appropriate disciplines with approval of a graduate adviser.
Degree Total: 34 credit hours

Master of Science in Natural Sciences (MS)
Concentration in Biology
Required Core Courses: 19 credit hours
BIOL 600 Research Methods in Life Science (3)
BIOL 620 Advanced Topic in Biology* (2/2)
*Repeated for credit with different subject matter for a total of four credit hours
BIOL 650 Grad Seminar in Life Science* (1/1/1/1)
*Repeated four times for a total of four credit hours
BIOL 559 Fundamental Principles of Laboratory Safety (1)
INDP 692 Research Ethics and Integrity (1)
Choose at least two of the following:
BIOL 610 Environmental Physiology (3)
BIOL 640 Advanced Molecular and Cell Biology (3)
BIOL 630 Advanced Microbiology (3)
Thesis Option:
BIOL 699 Thesis* (7)
*A minimum of seven credits is required; students must register for a least one credit hour per term until the thesis is completed, which may exceed the seven credit-hour minimum.
Non-thesis Option (requires approval of graduate committee chair):
BIOL 690 Independent Study (3)
OR
BIOL 692 Independent Research (3)
Elective Courses: Choose from the following courses in consultation with your adviser. Other 500- and 600-level courses offered in chemistry, forestry, geology, psychology, or other appropriate disciplines may be substituted for electives listed below with the approval of your biology adviser.
Elective Courses, Thesis Option: 12 hours
Elective Courses, Non-thesis Option: 18 hours
BIOL 505 Bacterial Physiology (3)
BIOL 510 Functional Genomics (4)
BIOL 515 Biotechnology (4)
BIOL 522 Plant Physiology (4)
BIOL 523 Molecular & Cell Biology (4)
BIOL 524 Molecular & Cell Biology Laboratory (1)
BIOL 525 Marine Biology (4)
BIOL 527 Immunology (3)
BIOL 528 Pathogenic Microbiology (4)
BIOL 530 Livestock Management (3)
BIOL 532 Vertebrate Physiology (3)
BIOL 535 Selected Topics in Life Science (1-4)
BIOL 555 Wildlife Diseases (3)
BIOL 556 Survey of Bioengineering (3)
BIOL 563 Animal Nutrition (3)
BIOL 576 Evolution (3)
BIOL 580 Parasitology (4)
BIOL 581 Develop Biology (4)
BIOL 582 Biochemistry 2 (3)
BIOL 585 Endocrinology (4)
BIOL 587 Histology (4)
BIOL 588 Soil Ecology (4)
BIOL 593 Field Botany (2)
BIOL 594 Field Zoology (2)
M.S. Thesis Defense
Open seminar and oral defense
M.S. Non-thesis Exam and Presentation
Comprehensive exam (≥ 75% will be considered as a passing grade) and formal oral and written presentation of independent study or independent research
Degree Total:
Thesis: 38 credit hours
Non-thesis: 40 credit hours

 

Biology (BIOL), Courses in

505. Bacterial Physiology (4); 3,1
This course covers aspects of the physiology and molecular biology of bacteria. The genetics, molecular structure and functional aspects of prokaryotic cells will be discussed. Bacterial metabolism will be studied, including energy production and use by aerobic and anaerobic microorganism. Concepts of cellular growth, biosynthesis and molecular genetics will also be addressed. Prerequisites: BIOL 300, 301, and CHEM 212.
510. Functional Genomics (4); 2,4
Functional genomics includes the study of function-related aspects of the genome. Different techniques and tools are used to improve our understanding of gene and protein functions, their interactions, and molecular evolution. Because of the large quantity of data produced by these techniques and the desire to find biologically meaningful patterns, bioinformatics is crucial to these types of analyzes. In this course students will analyze and explore the genome of a model organism to learn techniques and better understand the function and relationships of genes and proteins.
515. Biotechnology (4); 2,4
Introduces students to latest techniques in biotechnology with hands-on laboratories in recombinant DNA technology, bioinformatics, and molecular biology techniques used in genetic engineering, industrial microbiology, and agricultural biotechnology. Prerequisites: BIOL 300, and CHEM 341 or equivalent or permission of instructor. A special fee is charged.
522. Plant Physiology (4); 3,2
This course covers the physiology of germination, growth, flowering, fruiting, and senescence in plants. Prerequisites: BIOL 303, CHEM 341 or equivalent or permission of instructor.
523. Molecular & Cell Biology (4)
This course is a detailed exploration of basic cellular chemistry, macromolecules, cell structure and functions, and mechanisms and regulation of gene expression. The laboratory will explore eukaryotic cell biology using molecular biology techniques. Topics include DNA and protein structure and functions. Prerequisites: BIOL 301, 302, and 303 or equivalent or permission of instructor.
524. Molecular & Cell Biology Laboratory (1)
This is the laboratory course to accompany BIOL 423/523. This lab is required of students that have satisfied the Molecular & Cellular lecture requirement but have not taken the laboratory portion.
525. Marine Biology (4); 3,2
Major groups of marine invertebrates and algae are observed and studied in their natural habitats. Students participate in a 10-day field trip during the spring break, with a transportation and room charge to be determined at the time of the class. Enrollment limited to 16. Prerequisites: BIOL 302 and 303, or equivalent and permission of instructor.
527. Immunology (3); 3,0
This course studies diseases of vertebrates with emphasis on host-parasite interactions. The course includes principles of isolation, characterization, and control of pathogenic organisms as well as principles of vertebrate response to infection, antigen-antibody interaction, hypersensitivity, and autoimmune diseases. Prerequisite: BIOL 301 or equivalent or permission of instructor.
528. Pathogenic Microbiology (4); 2,4
This course covers fundamental concepts in the isolation, characterization, and control of pathogenic organisms as they relate to human-host parasite interactions.
530. Livestock Management (3); 3
This course addresses livestock health management, livestock production economics and effects on natural resources. Primary emphasis will be on beef cattle production, but other species of domestic animals and wildlife will be discussed.
532. Vertebrate Physiology (4); 3,2
Fundamental life processes in the vertebrates is covered in this course. Prerequisite: BIOL 302 and CHEM 341 or equivalent or permission of instructor.
535 – 635. Selected Topics in
Life Science (1 – 4 VC)
Specialized course in exploring topic(s) in life science. May be repeated with change of content.
555. Wildlife Diseases (3); 3
An introduction to viral bacterial, and fungal diseases found in wildlife species. The diagnosis and management of the disease are explored.
556. Survey of Bioengineering (3); 3,0
A survey of the major aspects of bioengineering is presented. Basic biology, physiology, and pathophysiology are integrated with engineering principles, modeling, measurement theory, biotechnology, and clinical instrumentation. Current topics and methods are discussed and made relevant. This course is for bioscience, engineering, biotechnology, and premed/vet students.
559. Fundamental Principles of Laboratory Safety (1); 1
This is an introduction to the principles of laboratory safety including the proper use of emergency safety equipment and personal protective equipment, instructions for the safe handling, labeling, storage and disposal of chemicals, and safety in the biology and physics labs. Emphasis will be placed on preparing science educators in safety procedures. Prerequisite: CHEM 211 and CHEM 212 or equivalent or permission of instructor.
563. Animal Nutrition (3); 3
This course provides students with an understanding of animal nutrition and appreciation of the importance of nutrition in health and economics. Subjects to be covered will include digestive anatomy, physiology, and nutrition of various animal species.
576. Evolution (3); 3
Evolution is studied in terms of molecular, Mendelian, and population genetics. Prerequisite: BIOL 300 or equivalent or permission of instructor.
580. Parasitology (4); 2,4
An introduction to the taxonomy and life cycles of vertebrate parasites and pathogenic effects upon their animal hosts; protozoan trematode, cestode, nematode, and acanthocephalan parasites of domestic animals and humans. Prerequisite: BIOL 423, or permission of instructor.
581. Developmental Biology (4); 3,2
This course investigates cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate animal development.
Topics include fertilization cleavage, gastrulation axis specification, organogenesis, morphogenesis, and stem cells. Laboratory sessions focus on experimental manipulations of early invertebrate and vertebrate embryos and emphasize student-designed research projects. Prerequisites: BIOL 301, BIOL 302 or equivalent or permission of instructor.
585. Endocrinology (4); 3,2
This course reviews the embryological origin, histological structure, and function of the endocrine glands. Individual organs, the hormones that it produces, and how its function may be integrated at the systemic and cellular level will be examined. Endocrine topics are presented with real-world examples and in a comparative manner among species. Prerequisites: BIOL 423 or 532 and 302 or equivalent or permission of instructor.
587. Histology (4); 2,4
This course covers microanatomy and functional organization of basic tissues: epithelium, connective tissue, cartilage, bone, muscle, and nerve. The course covers the histology of the blood and lymph vascular systems, glands, and secretion, especially in humans. Prerequisite: BIOL 432 or 532 or equivalent or permission of instructor. A special fee is charged.
588. Soil Ecology (4); 3,2
This course covers the soil as a habitat, including physical and chemical properties of soil, classification of soils, soil organisms (emphasis on soil fungi and bacteria), and nutrient cycling.
593. Field Botany (2); 1,2
Qualitative and quantitative techniques of community analysis, including floral sampling techniques for estimating population demographic patterns are covered in this course. The taxonomy and natural history of representative groups of land plants are studied in the field. Prerequisite: BIOL 303 or equivalent or permission of instructor.
594. Field Zoology (2); 1,2
This course covers the qualitative and quantitative techniques of community analysis, including faunal sampling techniques for estimating population demographic patterns. The taxonomy and natural history of representative groups of land animals will be studied in a field setting. Prerequisite: BIOL 302 or equivalent or permission of instructor.
600. Research Methods in Life Science (3); 3
This is an introduction to research methods in life science. Topics covered include libraries as research tools, introduction to statistical inference.
620. Advanced Topic in Life Science (2); 2
This course is in-depth consideration of a specific topic of interest to faculty and the graduate student population. Subject matter will vary from semester to semester, and the course may be repeated for credit.
630. Advanced Microbiology (3); 3,0
Advanced concepts of the physiology and molecular biology of microorganisms are covered. The genetics, molecular structure and functional aspects of prokaryotic cells will be discussed. Emphasis will be given to energy and biosynthetic metabolism in aerobic and anaerobic microbes. The role of prokaryotic organisms in global elemental cycles and how they sense and respond to their environment will also be covered. Prerequisites: BIOL 300, 301 or equivalent or permission of instructor.
640. Advanced Molecular and Cell Biology (3); 3
This course covers advanced concepts of molecular and cellular biology. The genetics, molecular structure, and functional aspects of eukaryotic cells, both in isolation and as part of multicellular systems, will be discussed. Prerequisite: BIOL 532 Vertebrate Physiology or equivalent or permission of instructor.
650. Graduate Seminar in Life Science (1)
Seminar presentations on current topics in life science. May be repeated for credit.
690. Independent Study (1 – 4 VC)
Independent study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
692. Independent Research (1 – 4 VC)
Independent research arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
699. Thesis (1 – 7 VC)
Individual research and writing in preparation of a graduate thesis. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

Chemistry (CHEM), Courses in

519. Advanced Instrumental Analysis (3); 0,6
Chemical instrumentation laboratory uses modern separation, purification, and instrumental analysis techniques including such techniques as NMR, GC-MS, FT-IR, fluorescence, HPLC, capillary electrophoresis (CE), X-ray diffraction (powder and single crystal XRD) and electrochemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 321 or 322 are required; CHEM 317 and CHEM 372 are recommended.
535 – 635. Selected Topic in Chemistry (3)
Course in topic or topics in chemistry. May be repeated with change of content.
541. Reaction Mechanisms (3)
This course covers theoretical organic chemistry including molecular orbital theory, photochemistry, orbital symmetry, and reaction mechanisms. Prerequisites: CHEM 317, CHEM 342, and CHEM 372.
542. Synthetic Chemistry (3)
This course is an advanced treatment of synthetic organic and inorganic chemistry and reaction mechanisms. Prerequisites: CHEM 317, 342, and 372.
550-650. Seminar in Chemistry (1 – 3 VC)
Seminar course in a topic or topics in chemistry. Prerequisites: CHEM 317, CHEM 342, and CHEM 372.
555. Chemistry Research Seminar (1)
Graduate students participating in a chemical research project will make one or two 30-minute presentations on their project to faculty members and other graduate and undergraduate students registered in the course. In addition the students will participate in the discussion evolving from other students’ presentations.
559. Fundamental Principles of Laboratory Safety (1)
This course is an introduction to the principles of laboratory safety including the proper use of emergency safety equipment and personal protective equipment, instructions for the safe handling, labeling, storage and disposal of chemicals, and safety in the biology and physics labs. Emphasis will be placed on preparing science educators in safety procedures. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
561. Inorganic Chemistry 1 (3)
This course covers quantum mechanical approach to chemical bonding, crystal and ligand field theory, acid/base theories, and transition metal chemistry. Prerequisites: CHEM 317 and CHEM 372.
562. Inorganic Chemistry 2 (3)
This course is a continuation of CHEM 561. Topics include metal, transition metal, and nonmetal inorganic topics and symmetry as related to spectroscopy and reaction mechanisms. Prerequisite: CHEM 561.
573. Chemical Kinetics (3)
This course is an in-depth study of chemical reaction kinetics. Prerequisites: CHEM 317 and CHEM 372.
581. Biochemistry 1 (3)
An introduction to the chemistry of biologically important molecules, including proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids; physical properties, mechanisms of action, and enzyme kinetics. Prerequisites or corequisites: CHEM 316 and CHEM 342.
582. Biochemistry 2 (3)
This course is a continuation of CHEM 581. Prerequisite: CHEM 581.
621. Advanced Analytical Chemistry (3)
This course is an in-depth treatment of chemical equilibria involving topics in acid/base, solubility, electro-chemistry, complexion reactions, and the theory of separations.
671. Chemical Thermodynamics (3)
This course is an in-depth study of chemical thermodynamics.
672. Quantum Chemistry (3)
This course is an in-depth study of spectroscopy and quantum mechanics.
691. Chemistry Colloquium (1)
Students and faculty discuss current research problems. May be repeated for credit. Course must be taken twice to fulfill program requirement.
699. Thesis (1 – 8 VC)
Individual research and writing in preparation of a graduate thesis. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.