Education Graduate Program

CounselingCurriculum and Instruction | Educational Leadership | Special Education  | Resources   | Directory  | Center for Professional Development

 


SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

Dr. Belinda Laumbach, Interim Dean
Victoria D. de Sanchez Teacher Education Center
Room 114B
505 454-3357
FAX: 505 454-3384

 

Mission Statement
The NMHU School of Education prepares teachers, counselors, and administrators for diverse and inclusive environments through excellence in teaching, research, and service.

Faculty
James M. Alarid (Special Education)
James B. Burns (Educational Leadership)
Kathryn Dziekan (Counseling)
Jayni Flores (Elementary Education)
Joan Gallini (General Education)
Geraldine Glover (Counseling)
Marie Hummel (Early Childhood Multicultural Education)
Michael Immerman (General Education)
Effie Laman (Special Education)
Karen Lehman (Special Education)
George Leone (Counseling)
Doug Main (Counseling)
Patricia Martinez-Burr (Counseling)
Alice Menzor (Curriculum & Instruction/ Reading)
Chris Nelson (Special Education)
Carolyn Newman (Early Childhood Multicultural Education)
Seonsook Park (Curriculum & Instruction/ Reading)
Lori Rudolph (Counseling)
Loretta Salazar (Curriculum & Instruction/ Bilingual)
Gayle Anne Talaga (Educational Leadership; Curriculum & Instruction)

The Teacher Education Center (TEC) building also serves as a home for Vista sin Limites, the Northeast Regional Education Cooperative, the Center for the Education & Study of Diverse Populations, Advanced Placement-New Mexico, Counselor Training Center and MESA-Northern New Mexico.

  • Established by the School of Education, the Center for the Education and Study of Diverse Populations studies diverse populations whose needs are unmet and who encounter barriers to services and opportunities, and develops strategies for removing those barriers.
  • The School of Education houses a regional Instructional Materials Evaluation Center that contains publisher-supplied samples of state-approved texts and materials for review by school district administrators, teachers, parents, and education faculty and students. The center also functions as an institutional curriculum library, providing selected samples of resources for short-term loan.
  • The Literacy Council of Northeastern New Mexico staffs an adult literacy center and provides services

within the Instructional Materials Evaluation Center.

  • The School of Education offers selected undergraduate and graduate programs at the centers in Santa Fe / Española, Rio Rancho, Raton and Farmington with the cooperation of the Educational Outreach Services Program.

Conceptual Framework
The NMHU School of Education believes in democratic access to an education, both theoretical and authentic that allows the reflective learner to continue to develop cultural schemas and diverse cognitive processing skills to construct a knowledge base, practice the skills and develop professional dispositions in authentic settings needed to excel in education, leadership, counseling or other self-determined endeavors.

Themes
There are eight themes that guide the School of Education’s practices and decision-making processes:
Diversity
Reflective Practitioner
Culturally Inclusive
Authentic Settings
Practice
Knowledge
Professionalism
Leadership

The Purpose of the School of Education
The purpose of the School of Education is to provide highly qualified, entry-level early childhood, elementary, secondary, and/or special education teachers and other professional personnel such as, educational leaders and counselors, to serve New Mexico and/or national P-12 school districts. The program is embraced by the following themes: diversity, leadership, culturally inclusive, authentic setting(s), practice, reflective practitioner, and knowledge and steeped in a conceptual framework that fosters democratic access to an education, allowing the reflective practitioner to continue to develop cultural schemas, diverse cognitive processing skills to construct a knowledge base that is entwined in our school’s themes.

Graduate Program in Education
The master’s program in education accepts students with personal commitment to the discipline who also meet the standards of scholarship. With the exception of a degree in counseling, master’s candidates complete 12 credits of courses in educational content and 12 credits in a selected emphasis field, as well as 12 credits in appropriate research methodologies. Education leadership requires 15 credits in the content areas and nine credits in a selected emphasis field.

School counseling and rehabilitation counseling require a 48 semester-hour curriculum. The licensed professional counseling concentration requires a 60 semester-hour curriculum. All three concentrations require successful completion of coursework, internship experience, and an exit exam. A vocational evaluation specialization is also available to rehabilitation students.

The master’s degree in education offers a variety of concentrations and emphases. The master of arts option in education leadership prepares individuals for licensure in administration or to serve in leadership roles in higher education.

The master’s degree in education offers a variety of concentrations and emphases. The master of arts option in education leadership prepares individuals for licensure in administration or to serve in leadership roles in higher education.

The master of arts option in special education provides the opportunity to specialize in the areas of general special education, cognitive impairments, learning disabilities and emotional and behavioral disorders.

An option in counseling and guidance offers a variety of emphases in school counseling, rehabilitation counseling, and professional counseling. The different emphases qualify students to apply for licensure or certification by various state and national agencies.

The curriculum and instruction option offers graduate work in a variety of academic content fields with both elementary and secondary emphases. The emphasis fields available to curriculum and instruction students include the educational subjects of reading, technology education, early childhood education, and bilingual education; and arts and sciences subjects including music, art, English, Spanish, history, political science, chemistry, life science, mathematics, computer science, business, and human performance and sport.

Master of Arts in Counseling (MA)

Counseling
The master of arts in counseling offers three concentrations. The school counseling emphasis area is designed to meet requirements for licensure in school counseling set by the State of New Mexico Public Education Department. The licensed professional counseling emphasis area is designed to meet requirements set by the New Mexico Counseling and Therapy Practice Board for licensure as a licensed mental health counselor (LMHC). The rehabilitation counseling emphasis is accredited by the National Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification for certified rehabilitation counselors. Rehabilitation Counseling also meets requirements for licensed rehabilitation counselor in the schools set by the State of New Mexico Public Education Department. A specialization in vocational evaluation is available to students in the rehabilitation concentration. Students must complete COUN 646 and COUN 648 with an internship.

For graduation, students must complete all coursework, internships, a written comprehensive exam, and a comprehensive case presentation. The written exam is the Counselor Preparation Comprehensive Exam (CPCE), which covers the eight core-curriculum content areas. Rehabilitation counseling students also have the choice to take the Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) Exam that covers ten curriculum areas.

As required by the American Counseling Association’s (ACA) Code of Ethics (and the CRC’s Code of Ethics) students who fail to demonstrate personal and professional appropriate and/or ethical behavior may be denied continuation in the program until some form of remediation is fulfilled. If a student demonstrates such questionable behavior, he or she will meet with the faculty of the Counseling Program to discuss the faculty’s concerns. If remediation is deemed necessary, the student will not be allowed to continue in the program until such remediation is completed. The student’s acceptance of admission into the Counseling Program is understood as a tacit acceptance of these terms of admission.

Otherwise, counseling students are assessed by the faculty at three major points: after completion of the pre-practicum course, during and after the practicum, and throughout the two-semester Internship. (As noted above, if there is a concern before these points, the faculty will call a meeting with the students and determine the need for and nature of remediation.) The purpose of these assessments is to determine the students’ suitability and potential for development as a counselor. If the faculty has concerns at any point regarding a student’s potential for being a counselor, the adviser will be responsible for informing the students of this concern. According to the ACA, the American School Counselor Association (ASCA), and the Council On Rehabilitation Education (CORE), it is the responsibility of the counselor educators to monitor the professional development of the student-counselor at all times and to take appropriate measures if indications of behavioral, emotional, or mental problems arise in any given student.

If a student needs remediation, the forms that it may take include the following:

  • The student may be asked to retake the pre-practicum course.
  • The student may be asked to take additional coursework to make up any academic deficiencies that might be noticed.
  • The student may be asked to seek out and engage in personal counseling or psychotherapy. If this is required, the student may be asked to spend a semester out of the program.
  • The student may be asked to disenroll from the program altogether.

If such remediation is needed, the student has the option to appeal such decisions. The steps of the appeal process are:

  • The student writes an appeal within one week stating the reasons why the student believes the remediation to be unjust or inappropriate. The statement is addressed to the students’ adviser and to the chair of the Counseling Department.
  • The adviser and/or the chair meets with the student within a week after receiving the written appeal to hear the appeal and to listen to suggested alternatives.
  • The adviser and chair meet with the other counseling faculty within a week after meeting with the student to discuss the student’s case.
  • If no change in made to the original decision, then the student can take the appeal to the dean of the School of Education.
  • If no change is made to the original decision the student can take the appeal to the dean of students.
  • At each step, the same process is followed. The student submits a written appeal to the University person involved. A meeting is arranged with the student by that person. The student presents his or her case with suggestions for an alternative remediation. A decision follows.

Resources and Facilities
The Victoria D. de Sanchez Teaching Education Center is a modern three-level building housing classrooms, two Interactive Television rooms, Smart classrooms, faculty offices and an instructional materials evaluation center.

Master of Arts in Counseling (MA)

The program is structured around two components: core curriculum, which includes research and methodology, and emphasis area.

Required core: 36 credit hours
COUN   601       Professional Orientation (3)
COUN   603       Theory & Practice of Career Development (3)
COUN   605       Pre-Practicum in Counseling Skills (3)
COUN   606       Theories & Principles of Individual Counseling (3)
COUN   607       Group Techniques of Counseling (3)
COUN   608       Appraisal of the Individual, Group, & Family in Counseling (3)
COUN   611       Multicultural Counseling (3)
COUN   634       Practicum (3)
COUN   698       Internship in Counseling (6)*
GNED   605       Statistics for Educators (3)
GNED   610       Educational Research Interpretation (3)
* 600 hours over two semesters. Three credits each semester. This can be done in one semester with approval of adviser in special circumstances.
Core Total: 36 credit hours
Students choose one of the following emphasis:
 
Emphasis in Clinical Mental Health Counseling
Required courses: 15 credit hours
COUN   612       Mental Health Ethics, Law and Practice (3)
COUN   615       Family Counseling (3)
COUN   619       Management of Counseling Program (3)
COUN   625       Counseling the Individual Across the Lifespan (3)
COUN   610       Assessment & Treatment Planning in Counseling (3)
Electives: 9 credit hours
Choose three courses in consultation with an adviser.
Emphasis Total: 24 credit hours
Core Total: 36 credit hours
Program Total: 60 credit hours
 
Emphasis in School Counseling
Required courses: 12 credit hours
COUN   602       Counseling Children & Adolescents (3)
COUN   615       Family Counseling (3)
COUN   620       Organization & Administration of School Counseling (3)
Electives: 3 credit hours
Choose one course in consultation with an adviser.
Emphasis Total: 12 credit hours
Core Total: 36 credit hours
Program Total: 48 credit hours

Emphasis in Rehabilitation Counseling
Students may choose a specialization in vocational evaluation in addition to this emphasis (see below).
Required courses: 12 credit hours
COUN   640       Foundations of Rehabilitation (3)
COUN   642       Case Management & Job Placement in Rehabilitation (3)
SPED   673       Medical Aspects of Disability (3)
SPED   674       Psychocultural/Psychosocial Aspects of Disability (3)
Emphasis Total: 12 credit hours
Core Total: 36 credit hours
Program Total: 48 credit hours
 
Emphasis in Clinical Rehabilitation Counseling
The emphasis in Rehabilitation Counseling is required.
COUN   610       Assessment and Treatment Planning (3)
COUN   612       Mental Health Ethics, Law and Practice (3)
COUN   615       Family Counseling (3)
COUN 625         Counseling Across the Lifespan (3)
Emphasis Total: 12 credit hours
 
Core Total: 36 credit hours
Rehab. Counseling Emphasis: 12 credit hours
Clinical Rehab. Counseling Emphasis: 12 credit hours
Program Total: 60 credit hours
 
 
Program Totals:
Professional Counseling = 60 credit hours
School Counseling = 48 credit hours
Rehabilitation Counseling = 48 credit hours
Clinical Rehabilitation Counseling = 60 credit hours
 
 
Specialization in Vocational Evaluation in Rehabilitation Counseling Option
The vocational evaluation specialization in rehabilitation counseling at Highlands is a 54 semester-hour program. Full-time students take the rehabilitation counseling emphasis in the manner prescribed by their adviser. In addition, students take the following courses:
Emphasis in Vocational Evaluation
Required courses: 6 credit hours
COUN    646        Foundations of Vocational Evaluation (3)
COUN    648        Advanced Vocational Evaluation (3)
Required:
COUN    698        Internship in Vocational Evaluation (3)*
* The vocational evaluation specialization requires one semester of internship in a vocational evaluation setting. This internship must be one of the two semesters required by the rehabilitation emphasis.
Specialization total: 6 credit hours
Rehabilitation Emphasis: 48 credit hours
Program total: 54 credit hours

Master of Arts in Curriculum and Instruction (MA)

This program is structured around three components: required core, emphasis area, and research methodology.
Required courses: 12 credit hours
EDLD 625 Educational Leadership (3)
OR
GNED 645 Sociocultural Factors Affecting Education (3)
GNED 615 Instructional Strategy & Mentoring (3)
GNED 641 Advanced Educational Psychology (3)
GNED 663 Principles of Curriculum Construction (3)
Research Methodology: 6 credit hours
GNED 605 Statistics for Educators (3)
GNED 610 Educational Research Interpretation (3)
Field Project/Thesis/Comprehensive Exam: 6 credit hours
Choose one of the following options:
GNED 697 Field Project (6)
OR
GNED 699 Thesis (6)*
*Students must register for thesis until complete which may exceed the six credit-hour requirement.
OR
Comprehensive Exam (6)*
*Comprehensive exam option: Students must complete six additional credits of approved electives instead of the six hours required for the field project/thesis. In addition, the students must pass a comprehensive examination over the graduate program. This examination may not be taken until after midterms in the last semester of coursework.

Emphasis Area: 12 credit hours
Students select an emphasis area in consultation with their education adviser and advisers for the field(s) of study selected. Emphasis area options are available in many of the university’s content fields. Specifically, emphasis-area options may be formulated from programs which offer 500- and/or 600- level courses in many disciplines including Advanced Placement and outside the school of Education, including art, music, Spanish, English, philosophy, history, political science, business, human performance and sport, anthropology, sociology, psychology, computer science, mathematics, life science (in biology and environmental science), chemistry, geology, physics, and also in technology teacher education, reading, early childhood multicultural education, and bilingual education. The adviser for the area of interest should be consulted.
In formulating plans for the emphasis area, students and advisers must consider various limitations: the frequency of offering of the necessary 500- and 600- level courses, both during the fall and spring semesters and in the summer session (the selection may be especially limited for students who rely totally or principally on classes scheduled in evenings and/or summers); any requirement from the New Mexico Public Education Department; having the preparation to undertake advanced studies in the field; and for students whose undergraduate degrees are from NMHU, the availability o appropriate 500-level courses that were not taken already at the 400-level.
Program Total: 36 credit hours
 
Additional stipulations for admission to the master of arts in education, curriculum and instruction: Students have received licensure for teaching in the State of New Mexico or the equivalent. Applications should indicate a desired emphasis area at the time of application.

Master of Arts in Educational Leadership (MA)

This program is structured around three components: required core, emphasis area, and research methodology.
Two options are available for master’s degree candidates in educational leadership.
Option One: is to pursue a master’s degree with eligibility for a New Mexico K-12 school administrator license. Stipulations for admission to this option is that candidates will ave received licensure for teaching in the state of New Mexico or the equivalent AND have at least one year of licensed K-12 teaching.
Option Two: is to pursue a master’s degree without eligibility for a New Mexico K-12 school administrator license. This option is tailored for candidates who do ot have a teaching license or teaching experience or wish the leadership and administrative knowledge obtained from the program. Candidates who choose this option would take all course requirements except the two semesters (six credit hours) of Internship. Instead they would take two additional three-credit elective courses approved by their adviser in the program to meet the 36-hur MA requirements.

Required courses: 15 credit hours
EDLD 600 Leader Exploration (3)
EDLD 615 School Finance & Budget (3)
EDLD 620 School Law (3)
EDLD 640 Supervision & Evaluation of Personnel (3)
EDLD 660 Data-Informed Instructional Leadership (3)
EDLD 680 Reflective Leadership (3)
EDLD 698 Internship 1 (3)
EDLD 698 Internship 2 (3) (Required for all K-12 licensure candidates)
Research Methodology: 6 credit hours
GNED 605 Statistics for Educators (3)
GNED 610 Educational Research Interpretations (3)
Field Project/Thesis/Comprehensive Exam: 6 credit hours
EDLD 697 Field Project (6)
OR
EDLD 699 Thesis (6)*
*Students must register for thesis until complete which may exceed the six credit-hour requirement.
OR
Comprehensive Exam (6)*
*Comprehensive exam option: Students must complete six more credits of approved electives. In addition, the students must pass a comprehensive examination over the graduate program. This examination may not be taken until after midterms in the last semester of coursework.

EDLD Emphasis Area Options:
EDLD 610 Action Research in Education (3)
EDLD 625 Educational Leadership & Principalship (3)
EDLD 630 School Community Relations (3)
EDLD 5/635 Selected Topic (1-3)
GNED 663 Principles of Curriculum Construction (3)
EDLD 690 Independent Study (1-4)
Program total 36: credit hours

Master of Arts in Special Education

This program is structured around three components: required core, emphasis area, and research methodology.
Required core: 12 credit hours
SPED 501 Diagnosis of Exceptional Child (3)
SPED 5/650 Seminar in Special Education (3)
SPED 612 The Special Education Program (3)
SPED 675 Organization & Administration of Special Education (3)
 
Emphasis Area: 12 credit hours
Option 1 (Non-Licensure):
Choose twelve credits from the following list or from additional courses approved by the program adviser:
ANTH 524 Social & Cultural Dynamics of the Southwest (3)
ANTH 561 Communication & Culture (3)
PHIL 525 Reasoning Skills for the Schools (3)
PSY 510 Physiological Psychology (3)
PSY 519 Introduction to Behavioral Therapy (3)
PSY 522 Human Sexuality (3)
PSY 530 Psychology of Sex Roles (3)
PSY 545 Behavior Disorders in Child (2)
PSY 573 Psychology of Suicide (3)
PSY 605 Memory & Cognition (3)
PSY 671 Psychodynamics & Psychopathology (3)
PSY 674 Individual Intelligence Test (3)
PSY 675 Personality Assessment (3)
PSY 679 Behavioral Therapy & Assessment (3)
SPED 672 Counseling Parents of Exceptional Child (3)
SPED 673 Medical Aspects of Disability (3)
SPED 674 Psychocultural/Psychosocial Aspects of Disability (3)
Research Methodology: 6 credit hours:
GNED 605 Statistics for Educators (3)
GNED 610 Educational Research Interpretation (3)
 
Option 2 (licensure): Students seeking special education licensure as part of the MA program are expected to complete the following 12 credit sequence:
Choose one of the following options:
RDED 511 Teaching and Diagnosis of Reading (3)
SPED 510 Curriculum & Methods for Students with Mild & Moderate Exceptionalities (3)
SPED 520 Curriculum & Methods for Students with Severe Exceptionalities (3)
SPED 530 Reading Instruction in Special Education (3)

Field Project/Thesis/Comprehensive Exam: 6 credit hours
SPED 697 Field Project (6)
OR
SPED 699 Thesis (6)*
*Students must register for thesis until complete which may exceed the six credit-hour requirement.
OR
Comprehensive Exam (6)*
*Comprehensive exam option: Students must complete six more credits of approved electives. In addition, the students must pass a comprehensive examination over the graduate program. This examination may not be taken until after midterms in the last semester of coursework.
Program Total: 36 credit hours

Certificates

Professional Counseling Certificate (*LMHC)
The Certificate Program in Professional Counseling qualifies students to sit for New Mexico’s Counseling and Therapy Practice Board’s Licensed Mental Health Counselor (LMHC) exam, the National Counseling Exam (NCE). Upon passing this exam, the student will be licensed as an LMHC. This license enables the person to practice mental health counseling and work toward the licensed professional clinical counselor’s (LPCC) status.
Required courses: 15 credit hours
COUN 610 Assessment & TX Planning in Counseling (3)
COUN 612 Mental Health Ethics: Law & Practice (3)
COUN 615 Family Counseling (3)
COUN 619 Management of Counseling Programs (3)
COUN 625 Counseling Individual Across the Lifespan (3)
Certificate Total: 15 credit hours

Rehabilitation Counseling Certificate (*PED K-12, **CRC)
The Certificate Program in Rehabilitation Counseling qualifies a student to sit for the Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) exam, the Certified Rehabilitation Counselor Exam (CRCE). Upon passing, the student will be certified as a national certified rehabilitation counselor. A second option is available for students of New Mexico and that is to be licensed through the Public education Department (PED) as a rehabilitation counselor K-12 with the public schools. This PED license will enable a person to work specifically with Special Education children and with children in transition in the schools.
 
Required curses: 18 credit hours
COUN 640 Rehabilitation Foundation (3)
COUN 642 Case Management /Job Placement (3)
COUN 644 Foundations of Transitions Planning (3)
OR
COUN 646 Foundations of Vocational Evaluation (3)
COUN 698 Internship in Rehabilitation Counseling (3)
SPED 673 Medical Aspects of Disability (3)
SPED 674 Psychocultural/Psychosocial Aspects of Disability (3)
Certificate Total: 18 credit hours
 
Counselor Education/School Counseling and Guidance Services (*PED K-12)
The Certificate Program in School Counseling qualifies a student to sit for the School Counseling exam through the PED. Upon passing this exam, the person will be issued a school counselor license and be eligible to work in public and private schools as a school counselor.

Required courses: 12 credit hours
COUN 602 Counseling Children and Adolescents (3)
COUN 615 Family Counseling (3)
COUN 620 Organization & Administration Of School Counseling Programs (3)
COUN 698 Internship in School Counseling (3)
Certificate Total: 12 credit hours
 
Reading Certificate
Postbaccalaureate students seeking a certificate leading to reading endorsement must complete a minimum of 12 credit hours of reading courses at the graduate level. Additional credits in reading may be required depending on the student’s prior coursework in reading, and prior licensure and endorsement history. All endorsements are awarded by the New Mexico Public Education Department (NMPED) and are subject to NMPED guidelines and requirements.
Required courses: 12 credit hours
RDED 511 Teaching Reading and Diagnosis (3)
RDED 526 Reading & Literature for Children & Young Adults (3)
OR
RDED 454 Literatura infantile y juvenile (3)
RDED 527 Reading in the Content Area (3)
RDED 540 Integrating Technology into Language Arts Curriculum (3)
OR
RDED 542 Literacy and Technology (3)
Certificate Total: 12 credit hours
 
TESOL Certificate
Postbaccalaureate students seeking a certificate leading to an endorsement in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) must complete a minimum of 12 credit hours of coursework at the graduate level. All endorsements are awarded by the New Mexico Public Education Department (NMPED) and are subject to NMPED guidelines and requirements. These include completion of a bachelor’s degree in education and a NM teaching license. It is important to note that the TESOL endorsement further requires a minimum of six credits in another language or passing the Prueba de Español para la Certificación Bilingüe exam. In addition to coursework, the NMPED requires passing the NMTA’s TESOL content examination.

Required courses: 12 credit hours
ELEM 517 English as a Second Language (3)
GNED 520 Sheltered English (3)
RDED 527 Reading in the Content Area (3)
RDED 535 Literacy for the ELL and ESL Classroom (3)
Certificate total credit hours required: 12 credit hours

Bilingual Education Certificate
Postbaccalaureate students seeking a certificate leading to a bilingual education endorsement must complete a minimum of 12 credit hours of coursework at the graduate level. All endorsements are awarded by the New Mexico Public Education Department (NMPED) and are subject to NMPED guidelines and requirements. These include completion of a bachelor’s degree in education and a New Mexico teaching license. It is important to note that the bilingual endorsement further requires passing the Prueba de Español para la Certificación Bilingüe exam or the language proficiency exam in Navajo. Those interested in other New Mexico pueblo languages must consult with their specific tribe. It is critical to consult carefully with the Licensure Unit at the NMPED regarding these language matters.

Required courses: 12 credit hours
GNED 512 Theories and Principles of Bilingual Education (3)
GNED 537 Instructional Methods for the Bilingual Classroom (3) (Span 300 prerequisite)
RDED 516 Reading in the Bilingual Classroom/La enseñanza de lectura en el salón bilingüe
OR
RDED 545 Literatura infantile y juvenile (3)
RDED 527 Reading in the Content Area (3)
Certificate total credit hours required: 12 credit hours
 
Advanced Placement Certificate
AP-New Mexico was developed at NMHU in 1993 to encourage and support teachers and schools in New Mexico to expand Advanced Placement (AP) course offerings for New Mexico secondary students. AP-New Mexico coordinates Advanced Placement Summer Institutes (APSI), which are professional development events of no less than four days with no fewer than 30 instructional hours, The institutes bring together teachers to discuss course-specific content, instructional strategies, course organization and methods for increasing student participation in courses that help them acquire the skills and habits they will need to be successful in college.
Advanced Placement Teaching is for teachers who wish to increase or develop their knowledge of the total AP Program and enhance or implement an AP or pre-AP program in their school.

Required courses: 12 credit hours
GNED 630 Advanced Placement Institute (3)
GNED 640 Curriculum Design & Management for Advanced Placement (3)
GNED   650 Foundations of the Adv Placement Prog, Leadership Approaches, & Vertical Teaming (3)
GNED   635 ST: Advanced Placement (3)
Certificate total credit hours required: 12 credit hours

Educational Leadership Certificate
Candidates seeking to complete the certificate program leading to licensure for the purpose of attaining education administration licensure must hold an MA or MS and a New Mexico level III teacher licensure. Candidates for the certificate program are expected to complete 18 credit hours of coursework from the educational leadership core course sequence (with allowance for up to two curse substitutions from the educational leadership emphasis area, based on the candidate’s job interest and needs). Additionally, candidates are required to complete six credit hours of university-supervised administrative internship (over two semesters).

Required courses: 24 credit hours
EDLD 600 Educational Leadership and Organizational Change (3)
EDLD 615 School Finance and Resource Allocation (3)
EDLD 620 Legal Issues for School Leaders (3)
EDLD 640 Instructional Leadership, Supervision, and Evaluation (3)
EDLD 660 Data Informed Instructional Leadership (3)
EDLD 680 Reflective Leadership (3)
EDLD 698 Educational Leadership Internship 1(3)***
EDLD 698 Educational Leadership Internship 2 (3)***
Certificate total credit hours required: 24 credit hours
***Licensure candidates are permitted to substitute a core course (600-680) with a course from the EDLD emphasis area (listed below). Such requests are based on the candidate’s job desire and needs, based on a written request from the student specifying the need and value of the substitution, and with signature approval of the adviser and department chair. Internships (EDLD 698 I & II) are required by the NNMPED and do not qualify for substitution.

EDLD 611 Action Research in Education (3)
EDLD 625 Educational Leadership and the Principalship (3)
EDLD 630 School Community Relations (3)
EDLD 635 ST: Educational Leadership (3)
EDLD 690 Independent Study (3)

Secondary Certificate Program Leading to Licensure
Prospective teachers holding a bachelor’s degree may complete the secondary certificate program in order to obtain a secondary license in New Mexico. In addition to completing coursework listed on the framework, candidates must have 24 credits, including 12 upper division, in a content area taught in the public schools. Please see attached framework.

Required Courses: 28 credit hours
GNED 251 Field-Based 1 Teacher Preparation Experience (1)
GNED 351 Field-Based 2 Teacher Preparation Experience (2)
GNED 302 Educational Psychology (3)
RDED 527 Reading in the Content Area (3)
GNED 510 The Art and Science of Teaching (3)
GNED 544 Computer Application in Education (3)
GNED 545 Knowledge of the Profession (3)
GNED 451 Field-Based 3 Teacher Prep Experience (6)
GNED 555 Classroom Management (3)
Certificate total credit hours required: 28 credit hours

Counseling and Guidance (COUN), Courses in

535 – 635. Selected Topic in Counseling and Guidance (1 – 4 VC)
Course in topic or topics in counseling and guidance. May be repeated with change of content.
601. Professional Orientation (3)
This course is an overview of theory, practice, methods and basic principles used by counselors in various settings. Topics include understanding the professional identity of counselors from a historical perspective, counseling theory and skills, personality development, specialty areas in counseling and multicultural considerations. The importance of professional ethics and self-exploration will be emphasized throughout the course. This course and COUN 606 are prerequisites for several courses.
602. Counseling Children and Adolescents (3)
This course provides knowledge and skills necessary to provide developmentally appropriate therapeutic interventions for children, adolescents and their families. Topics include parent/child development, interviewing and counseling, case formulation, family systems, group counseling, and consultation. Ethical and legal considerations regarding minors and families will be examined throughout the course. Prerequisites: COUN 601 and 606.
603. Theory and Practice of Career Development (3)
A study of theories and approaches useful in career counseling. Emphasis will be given to career planning models, sources of information, and exposure to the changing world of work.
604. Counseling in School (3)
Introduction to the types of problems found among elementary school children; and exploration of developmental counseling for use in the elementary school.
605. Pre-Practicum in Counseling Skills (3)
This course serves as the student’s first formal exposure to the actual practice of counseling. As such, it will introduce the student, within a safe and controlled setting, to the dynamics and process of the counselor’s role, including core counseling skills, structure of the interview, and counselor characteristics. Prerequisites: COUN 601 and COUN 606.
606. Theory and Principles of Individual Counseling (3)
Contemporary theories and principles of individual counseling with emphasis on their application to counseling situations in schools and agencies. This course and COUN 601 are prerequisites for several courses.
607. Group Techniques of Counseling (3)
Contemporary theories and principles of group counseling with emphasis on their application to counseling situations in schools and agencies. The student learns the principles of effective group facilitation, leadership styles and techniques, group stages and process, and membership roles and resistances. Prerequisites: COUN 601 and COUN 606.
608. Appraisal of the Individual, Group, and Family in Counseling (3)
The focus of this course is on direct and objective methods of assessment and their practical utility in the practice of counseling. In addition, projective techniques for assessment are studied as well as counseling strategies for disseminating the results.
610. Assessment and Treatment Planning in Counseling (3)
This course is an overview of the assessment and treatment of problematic human behavior patterns and characteristics. The primary focus is a study of the major mental, emotional, and personality disorders as categorized in the DSM-IV. The emphasis is on the accurate diagnosis and treatment plan formulation for these disorders, with special consideration given to ethnic and cultural factors in the lives of individuals. The learning modality includes student reflection for greater relevance in understanding.
611. Multicultural Counseling (3)
Acquaints students with contrast of values, attitudes, and life styles of the predominant ethnic groups in the local region as well as throughout the nation. The students are expected to review emerging cross-cultural counseling approaches as a basis for developing a personal approach.
612. Mental Health Ethics, Law and Practice (3)
This course introduces students to professional, ethical and legal issues affecting the practice of counseling. Ethical decision-making, understanding and applying ethical codes and laws, and opportunities to develop critical thinking skills will be emphasized and practiced throughout the course. Course will include lecture, experiential activities, discussion, role-plays, and group work.
613. Advanced Group Counseling Seminar (3)
A study of four to six group counseling approaches for practicing counselors. Each student becomes proficient at applying at least one approach. Prerequisite: COUN 607.
614. Existential Counseling (3)
This course gives the student an in-depth understanding of the principles and techniques of existential counseling. An existential counseling is defined as both a theoretical orientation and a practical approach to working with individuals and their problems with everyday living. Attention is given to the application of existential principles to culturally diverse populations. It is also seen how existential counseling responds to current needs for more brief forms of counseling. The overall approach includes the development of understanding through personal reflection.
615. Family Counseling (3)
This course focuses on developing intervention skills for working with family systems. Emphasis is on systems theory in family counseling providing students with a beginning understanding of applications in working with families. There will be opportunity for in-class application of the skills introduced. Prerequisite: COUN 606.
616. An Overview of Art Therapy and the Creative Process (3)
This course will extend over two weekends and will be an experiential journey into the unconscious. It will provide an opportunity through exercises using art, movement, music and imagery to experience ourselves more deeply and learn to apply the creative process in our work with clients. We will learn the origin of dynamically oriented art therapy, use gestalt art therapy to explore our sub-personalities, discover archetypes and enact a fairy tale using Jungian art therapy and investigate our expanded consciousness through the Human Potential Movement and contact with our high self. By doing our own inner work, we will discover directly and profoundly the impact the creative process has on our own unconscious and how to hold and honor the psyche of the other. No experience in art or movement is necessary.
617. Art/Play Therapy/Sandtray Counseling (3)
In this class we will explore the power of sandtray therapy with adults and children as well as art and play therapy for children. We will discover how these modalities can help to uncover the client’s therapeutic issues, learn about the materials needed and establishing a safe environment, explore the appropriate responses to make and questions to ask and the use of directive and non-directive approaches. Additionally, we will use sandtray experientially to deepen awareness of our own issues, contact our inner child through play therapy and experiment with fundamental techniques using art therapy to enhance our ability to connect with our clients in child therapy.
619. Management of Counseling Program (3)
This course covers the role, responsibilities, and functions of the licensed professional counselor in community mental health centers or community counseling centers. Included in the course content are the roles and responsibilities of the professional counselor in these settings. Also covered are the various types of client populations that are typically seen in these community mental health settings and the challenges that they can bring to the professional.
620. Organization and Administration of School Counseling (3)
This course provides knowledge and skills necessary for school counselors to implement a developmentally appropriate, comprehensive school counseling program. Planning, designing, implementing and evaluating school counseling program will be discussed. Other topics include history of school counseling, legal and ethical considerations, program management, and the role of the school counselor. Collaboration, consultation, coordination and school counseling skills will be emphasized throughout the course. Competencies outline by the New Mexico Public Education Department, ASCA, and CACREP are addressed.
621. Grief, Loss and Expressive Arts Therapy (3)
In this class we will explore in a supportive environment our grief and how the experience of the expressive arts can allow the grieving process and healing to unfold. We will see a slide presentation on sudden death and the healing that followed using art therapy as well as explore the stages of grief and the use of creativity for moving through these stages. We will experience our own issues of loss and how, through the power of art, movement and journaling, we can access our inner allies and begin to heal our own wounds. We will enact an ancient myth, discover our own ancestral work that may still need completing, discuss complicated grief, and learn to apply the expressive arts in working with our clients. As we move through our healing and contact our fullness we will be better able to assist our clients in their ability to touch their fullness as they move through their recovery.
622. Play Therapy (3)
This course focuses on training to be a therapeutic agent in the lives of children through the utilization of play therapy.
625. Counseling the Individual Across the Lifespan (3)
This course familiarizes counseling students with the spectrum of theory and hands-on practice of counseling techniques used with individuals as they develop across the lifespan. The problems and conflicts appearing in different life stages and their treatment through specific counseling skills and strategies are covered. Emphasis is placed on the individual within a family context.
630. Current Trends and Topics in Addictions (3)
This course focuses on a variety of topics such as treatment, prevention, substance abuse, community outreach, evaluation, assessment, ethics, policies, and other current topics that relate to addictions. Students will be exposed to treatment facilities within the community.
631. Addictions Counseling (3)
This course focuses on an overview of substance addictions and process addictions: a) history, b) etiology models of addictions, c) types of addictions, d) different populations and settings effected by addictions, e) treatment, f) evaluation, g) ethics, and h) policies related to addiction. Additional emphasis is placed on the unique needs and characteristics of person with disabilities as they interact with addiction and dependency.
634. Practicum in Counseling (3)
Face-to-face experience in counseling and guidance in a supervised, recorded, and evaluated counseling setting. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Pre-arrangement and permission of instructor, COUN 601, 605, 606, and 607 plus one other counseling course approved by adviser.
636. Mediation and Counseling Process (3)
A study of mediation process as a tool for managing conflict in the school, home, and the work environment. The course is designed to provide an alternative way of settling disputes as expediently and constructively as possible. Emphasis will be placed on strategies that will enhance the counseling process.
637. Advanced Practicum in Counseling (3)
This course is an extension of COUN 634, Practicum in Counseling. It is off campus in local agencies and clinics to give the student an experience in the real working conditions of agency counselors. The student will learn record-keeping, treatment-planning, and related skills.
638. Assistive Technology Assessment
This course teaches students to use and adapt a variety of assistive technology deices and software to optimize the functional and vocational capacities of individuals with disabilities. Applications of rehabilitation and assistive technology are overviewed for a wide range of integrated settings, including vocational evaluation.
640. Foundations of Rehabilitation Counseling (3)
Foundations of Rehabilitation Counseling focuses on the history and philosophy of rehabilitation and rehabilitation counseling, including federal legislation concerning vocational rehabilitation and independent living mandates. The course also focuses on attitudinal, physical and systems barriers to social integration, including the current range of services provided for persons with disabilities, and on informed consumer review, choice, and personal responsibility in the rehabilitation process. The course explores rehabilitation process provided in various setting, noting career alternatives for rehabilitation counselors.
642. Case Management and Job Placement in Rehabilitation (3)
The goal of Vocational Rehabilitation is most often to assist people with disabilities in job placement, i.e., preparing for employment, and obtaining and maintaining appropriate employment. This course is designed to provide the rehabilitation counseling student in overview of the job placement and case management functions of rehabilitation counseling, and to enhance the ability to rehabilitation counseling students to develop and implement successful job placement strategies for person with disability. Case management is the process through which the rehabilitation counselor helps a single client enter and move through the vocational rehabilitation process, concluding with appropriate employment. The course addresses case management practiced in industry, public, and private settings, and provides knowledge of the managed care system. Practical experiences using a case development model will be provided.
644. Transition Planning Assessment (3)
This course will serve as an introduction to the practices and principles of planning for the transition of students with disabilities from the secondary school setting to the world of work, independent living, and/or post-secondary education. Emphasis is placed upon vocational evaluation and assessment strategies for working with students from different exceptionalities.
646. Foundations of Vocational Evaluation (3)
The focus of this course is on the introduction to client and work site evaluation, behavioral observation, individualized vocational evaluation planning, ethics, use of support service options and report development. General principles in vocational evaluation techniques (interest, achievement, aptitudes, values, temperaments and skills) as they apply to person with disabilities will be reviewed. Hands-on experience with evaluation tools is a required component of the class.
648. Advanced Vocational Evaluation (3)
The focus of this course is on advanced techniques in vocational evaluation including the use and development of work samples, portfolio development, functional vocational evaluation in transition, and the evaluation/use of assistive technology. Course work will cover current state and federal regulations affecting vocational evaluation and work adjustment practice.
650. Seminar in Counseling (1–4 VC)
Seminar course in a topic or topics in counseling and guidance.
690. Independent Study (1–4 VC)
Independent study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
692. Independent Research (1–4 VC)
Independent research arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
696. Professional Paper (1)
This course is designed to be a one semester-hour course for those students who are finished with all their course work but still need to do their professional paper. This allows the students to be enrolled in the university as they complete their professional paper. A course like this is mandated by the university so students can be enrolled when all other course work has been completed. This is not the mandatory course unless the student needs to continue to be enrolled in the university but has no courses remaining to be taken.
697. Field Project (1–6 VC)
Individual field research and writing in preparation of a graduate field project (equivalent to a thesis). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
698. Internship/School, Professional, and Rehabilitation Counseling or Vocational Evaluation (3–6 VC)
The internship is the final and most comprehensive professional experience in the counseling program. The intent of the internship is to provide the student with closely supervised training at a site outside of the university environment, which is congruent to his or her orientation within the counseling program. In order to ensure that the students individualized career goals are met in the internship experience, arrangements for the internship are negotiated between the student, the on-site supervisor and the student’s supervising professor at New Mexico Highlands University. Prerequisites: COUN 601, 605, 606, 607 and 634.
699. Thesis (1–6 VC)
Individual research and writing in preparation of a graduate thesis. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

Early Childhood Multicultural Education (ECME), Courses in

515. Principles of Early Childhood Multicultural Education (3)
An in-depth study of the historical, theoretical, and philosophical development of early childhood education and its implications on current issues and problems.
524. Curriculum in Early Childhood Multicultural Education Programs (3)
An in-depth study of various early childhood education curricula and the development and design of a curriculum guide.
528. Organizational Designs of Early Childhood Multicultural Education Programs (2)
Planning early childhood education programs for teachers, supervisors, administrators, and social workers.
529. Teaching the Perceptual Skills (2)
The rationale, the techniques, and the sequence of teaching auditory, oral, visual, and psycho-motor skills prior to reading, writing, and arithmetic.
534. Practicum in Early Childhood Multicultural Education (1–4 VC)
Campus work placement with specific responsibilities over a sustained period of time. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
535. Selected Topic in Early Childhood Multicultural Education (1–4 VC)
Course in topic or topics in early childhood education. May be repeated with change of content.
582. Early Childhood/Special Education (3)
Developing an awareness in educators concerning an understanding of children with or without special needs. Cross-listed as: SPED 582.
590. Independent Study (1–4 VC)
Individual, directed study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
592. Independent Research (1–4 VC)
Individual, directed research arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

Educational Leadership (EDLD), Courses in

535 – 635. Selected Topic in Educational Leadership (1 – 4 VC)
Course in topic or topics in educational leadership. May be repeated with change of content.
600. Leadership Exploration (3)
The purpose of the course is to assist school leaders with understanding the dynamics of organizations and how these dynamics affect organizational and student performance results. Focus will be given to understanding components of creating high performing environments, to include organizational theory application and the effects of organizational structure and design, human relations and behavior, culture and climate and the politics of the change process. Critical internal and external factors that affect organizational performance will be examined. Theory and leadership practices will be surveyed in the context of connecting leadership to organization change. Course objectives will address investigation into how organizational decision-making, management systems, change processes, technology, culture and behavior all play critical roles in addressing school improvement and student achievement.
608. Research Development I (1)
The research development course will have two foci: (1) all aspects of thesis development, including statement of purpose, related literature, conceptual frameworks, and organizational frameworks considerations for the thesis/field project/portfolio; and (2) development of the framework for their portfolio.
611. Action Research in Education (3)
Action Research is a graduate-level class addressing both educational research and school improvement. The aims of Action Research include a) development of the school leader’s knowledge and skills in applied research techniques and developing action research for implementation in classrooms and schools, and b) preparing school leaders for informed analysis and evaluation of research. Prerequisite: GNED 610
615. School Finance and Budgeting (3)
Engaging school leaders in an intensive process that focuses on school financing in New Mexico is the purpose of this course. The content will include school-based budgeting, budget planning and development, budget management, financial adequacy and equity, sources of revenue and their intent, operations management, facility planning, food services, auxiliary services and the connection of resource allocation and accountability to school-level decisions. The effects of resource allocation with respect to instructional program and staffing needs will also be addressed.
620. School Law (3)
The legal basis of public education will be the focus of this course. Constitutional, federal, state, tribal, local and tort law will be explored in terms of the application of ethical policies and procedures and the rights and responsibilities of school personnel and students, including special populations. State statutes, the public school code and state regulations as they affect public education will also be studied with application to the daily operations of the school work environment and its delivery of services. Legal issues, which the school principals would encounter in hiring personnel, evaluating personnel, facilitating staff development for instructional personnel and dismissing personnel, will also be explored.
625. Educational Leadership and the Principalship (3)
This course is a study of the nature, processes, and functions of leadership, developing skills in leadership, communication, improving instruction for student learning, and group development.
630. School Community Relations (3)
The course focuses on the relationships that are needed to build strong school and community partnerships. Students will be able to combine theory and practice (praxis) in improving their knowledge and skills related to connecting the schools with a larger community.
634. Practicum in Educational Leadership (1–4 VC)
Campus work placement with specific responsibilities over a sustained period of time. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
635. Selected Topic in Educational Leadership (3)
Course in topic or topics in educational leadership. May be repeated with change of content.
640. Instructional, Leadership, Supervision, and Evaluation (3)
The course provides a knowledge of the roles and responsibilities of the school leader within the charge of supervision and evaluation. Students will reflectively examine their knowledge and sensitivity to the issues and relationships between effective leadership skills and the ability to develop the capacity of schools as culturally responsive learning communities for continual renewal. An emphasis on instructional leadership and the practical and human dimensions or supervision is studied in conjunction with current issues facing school leaders and schools. Course content will cover the strategies necessary to utilize staff supervision and evaluation as a process for professional growth. Supervision will be viewed in terms of capacity building, e.g., staff and career development, professional growth, coaching, mentoring, studying one’s own teaching and creating organizations in which learning, rather than power and control is the focus. State teacher evaluation, utilizing the three-tiered licensure system in New Mexico, will be presented and incorporated into applied practice throughout this course.
651. Research Development II (1)
The research development course will have two foci to continue to develop: (1) all aspects of thesis development, including statement of purpose, related literature, conceptual frameworks, and organizational frameworks considerations for the thesis/field project/portfolio; and (2) midpoint review of portfolio.
660. Date-Informed Instructional Leadership (3)
This leadership course is for graduate students who are contemplating pursuit of a career in K-12 educational leadership. The course is designed to enable school leaders to obtain, evaluate, and interpret data for informing school improvement. The course focuses on the ability to use an understand research and data systems in ways that contribute to school achievement and school productivity. Knowledge of educational leadership necessary for leading school improvement in diverse school setting in integrated throughout the course. Data-informed decision-making processes and communication of results, progress and involvement strategies to engage all stakeholders in the school involvement strategies to engage all stakeholders in the school improvement process are also addressed. This course is core requirement for the MA 1 or NM Licensure in Education Leadership.
680. Reflective Leadership (3)
This is the capstone course that provided an opportunity for reflection, application and integration of knowledge acquired in the program.
690. Independent Study (1–4 VC)
Independent study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
692. Independent Research (1–4 VC)
Independent research arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
697. Field Project (1–6 VC)
Individual field research and writing in preparation of a graduate field project (equivalent to a thesis). Prerequisite: GNED 610 and permission of instructor.
698. Internship in Educational Leadership (1–6 VC)
This internship is a required two semester sequence (I & II, each 3-credit hours) for education leadership candidates in the MA (for K-12 educators), or in the licensure-only option (for K-12 candidates currently holding a master’s degree). This lecture/lab course meets during each internship semester five times for three hours in a lecture format; additionally, each candidate completes six contact hours of weekly supervised internship (lab) at his/her work location under the direction of a university supervisor and a qualified administrative mentor. Prerequisite for EDLD 698 is completion of a minimum of 12 credit hours of required course work for the MA, or six credit-hours toward the licensure-only option. Prerequisite: completion of a minimum of 12 credit hours of required course work for the MA, or six credit hours toward the licensure only option.
699. Thesis (1–6 VC)
Individual research and writing in preparation of a graduate thesis. Prerequisite: GNED 610 and permission of instructor.

Education, General and Secondary (GNED), Courses in

510. The Art and Science of Teaching in Secondary Schools (4); 3,2
Designed to provide an overview of curriculum and organization in the secondary school and to offer actual teaching experience in a “micro-teaching” situation, applying basic teaching strategies and techniques for the purpose of developing teacher competency. A special fee is charged.
512. Theories and Principles of Bilingual Education (3)
Fundamental theories and principles of bilingual education, preparing the prospective teacher to address the issues and concerns intelligently in the classroom.
520. Sheltered English for Content Area Instruction (3)
This course provides pre-service and in-service teachers a set of linguistic, instructional, assessment and classroom-management practices that allows English language learners (ELLs) from the advanced-beginner level on to develop content-area knowledge, operational skills and increased language proficiency.
525. Reasoning Skills for the Schools (3)
A general introduction to the basic skills involved in reasoning and critical thinking and how they can be incorporated into the curricula of the schools.
535–635. Selected Topic in General Education (1–4 VC)
Course in topic or topics in general education. May be repeated with change of content.
536. Parent and Community Involvement (3)
Development in prospective teachers and experienced educators of necessary attitudes and strategies related to involving parents and other community members in the educational process. Students will review the research that demonstrates the positive results from involving parents as partners in the child’s learning process.
537. Instructional Methodologies for Use in Spanish/English Bilingual Classrooms (3)
Demonstrate knowledge of and use theories, approaches, methods and techniques for teaching literacy, biliteracy and other academic skills in English and the native language. Spanish is the language of instruction and student participation/presentations. Prerequisite: SPAN 201 or SPAN 202.
544. Computer Applications in Education (3)
Provides teachers a working knowledge of the microcomputer and its specific applications in education. A special fee is charged.
545. Knowledge of the Profession (3)
Legal, ethical, career, and organizational issues related to education. Students will be given experiences to assist them in communicating effectively with different individuals involved in the educational process. Prerequisite: Complete all required coursework (major and minor) and admission to student teaching. Corequisite: Appropriate major Field-Based III experience.
550-650. Seminar in General or Secondary Education (1-4 VC)
Seminar course in a topic or topics in general or secondary education.
555. Classroom Management (3)
Introduces the student to a variety of techniques for managing behavior in the classroom. Major areas and specific techniques within each will be presented and practiced both in the class and in the student’s own teaching situation. Prerequisite: Admission to student teaching and permission of instructor.
590-690. Independent Study (1-4 VC)
Individual, directed study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
605. Statistics for Educators (3)
Basic statistics essential to the collection, summarization, and interpretation of statistical data that the educator frequently encounters.
610. Educational Research Interpretation (3)
Prepares the potential research consumer to analyze and evaluate research critically, to understand fundamental research principles and techniques, and to design research stratagems for problem areas in education. Prerequisite: GNED 605.
611. Action Research in Education (3)
Action Research is a graduate level class addressing both educational research and school improvement. The aims of Action Research include: a) development of the school leaders knowledge and skills in applied research techniques and developing action research for implementation in classrooms and schools, and b) preparing school leaders for informed analysis and evaluation of research Prerequisite: GNED 610
615. Instructional Strategy and Mentoring (3)
Investigation and development of lessons based on a variety of teaching strategies that are appropriate for different grade levels and subject areas. Peer mentoring skills will be developed through coaching activities while practicing various teaching strategies.
630. Advanced Placement Institute (3)
A summer institute and two day follow up designed to prepare teachers to teach Advanced Placement and Pre AP courses.
634. Practicum (1–4 VC)
Supervised field experiences; planned, recorded, and evaluated. Prerequisite: Pre-arrangement and permission of instructor.
636. Workshop in Education (1–4 VC)
Workshop is a selected topic, which may be offered at the request of a school district or teacher group attempting to solve an educational problem.
640. Curriculum Design & Management for Advanced Placement (3)
This course will provide an in-depth discussion of academic content and methods for delivering instruction in Advanced Placement classrooms.
641. Advanced Educational Psychology (3)
Application of recent learning research to instructional, curricular, and administrative problems.
645. Sociocultural Factors Affecting Education (3)
Studies of the social and cultural factors influencing educational practice with emphasis on Hispanic and Native American cultures of the Southwest and identification of local factors of a social/cultural nature that influence educational practice.
650. Foundations of the Advanced Placement Program, Leadership Approaches and Vertical Teaming (3)
This course introduces the foundations of Advanced Placement and vertical teaming. In addition, program development and evaluation will be explored.
663. Principles of Curriculum Construction (3)
A study of the social, cultural, psychological, and philosophical bases related to the principles and technical problems of curriculum development. The course assists in the identification of local educational needs through assessment.
692. Independent Research (1–4 VC)
Independent research arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
697. Field Project (1–6 VC)
Individual field research and writing in preparation of a graduate field project (equivalent to a thesis). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
699. Thesis (1–6 VC)
Individual research and writing in preparation of a graduate thesis. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

Elementary Education (ELEM), Courses in

517. English as a Second Language (3)
A study of English as a second language, conveying methods and procedures of teaching English to children and adults for whom English is not the native tongue. Students will be introduced to second language acquisition theories and basic elements of the sound system. It is highly recommended that RDED 411 be taken prior to or concurrently with this class.
535-635. Selected Topic in Elementary Education (1 – 4 VC)
Course in topic or topics in elementary education. May be repeated with change of content.
542. Teaching Elementary School Science and Social Studies (3)
Development of teaching strategies appropriate to recent innovations in science and social science teaching for multicultural classrooms. Laboratories will be offered in both English and Spanish, when possible, to provide opportunities for Spanish/English bilingual majors and other interested students to develop skills for teaching science and social science in Spanish.
590-690. Independent Study (1–4 VC)
Individual, directed study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
619. Mathematics in the Elementary School (3)
A detailed consideration of problems of elementary mathematics–what to teach, the grade placement of content, and the methods and materials of teaching.
621. Evaluation of Classroom Performance in Elementary School Mathematics (2)
The use of teacher-made and standardized instruments to assess performance in elementary mathematics, diagnose areas of difficulty, and prescribe remediation.
622. Theory and Practice of Teaching Elementary School Mathematics (3)
Current classroom practices in elementary mathematics related to the various theories of learning. Emphasis will be placed on current developments.
624. Advanced Techniques of Teaching Social Studies in the Elementary School (3)
Exploration of the modern social studies curriculum with emphasis on research and curriculum development.
625. Science Education in the Elementary Grades (3)
History of science education and methodology in the elementary school, with emphasis on current trends.
634. Practicum (1 – 4 VC)
Campus work placement with specific responsibilities over a sustained period of time. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
650. Seminar in Elementary Education (1 – 4 VC)
Seminar course in topic or topics in elementary education.
692. Independent Research (1 – 4 VC)
Independent research arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.