Homecoming September 13 - September 22

Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminal Justice
Dr. Gloria Gadsden, Department Chair
Lora Magnum Shields Science Building, Room 245
505-454-3209
FAX: 505-454-3331
E-mail: gygadsden@nmhu.edu

 



Mission of the Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal Justice

The mission of the Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal Justice is to contribute to meeting the educational and research needs in sociology, anthropology, criminal justice and the related fields; contribute to meeting the career needs in social services and social sciences, tribal, state, and federal career requirements, as well as contribute to training for careers in education, law, public service, and other social science fields; contribute to meeting the need for secondary school teacher certification in sociology and/or anthropology; and to provide sociocultural service and expertise for the region, as well as the greater global community.

Top


Faculty

Rebecca Alvarez, Ph.D. (Sociology/Criminal Justice)
Erika Derkas, Ph.D. (Sociology)
Victoria Evans, M.A. (Anthropology)
Gloria Gadsden, Ph.D. (Sociology/Criminal Justice)
Mario Gonzales, Ph.D. (Anthropology)
Monica Rossetti, MA (Sociology/Criminal Justice)
Orit Tamir, Ph.D. (Anthropology)
Kallie Wilbourn, M.A. (Anthropology)

 

Top


Sociology and Anthropology (B.A.)

The disciplines of sociology and anthropology combine to offer a holistic approach to the study of humankind. The program offers both Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degree options with four possible emphases: sociology, anthropology, criminology, and American Indian studies. If a minor is required for this degree, students may not minor in Sociology or Anthropology.
The program emphasizes an applied approach to the study of society and human culture. Small classes provide an enriched educational environment for both students and faculty. Career opportunities include preparation for graduate studies, teaching, cultural resource management, and practice in federal, state, and local agencies, as well as in the nonprofit sector.

Major in Sociology and Anthropology (B.S.)

For a Bachelor of Science degree, complete requirements for bachelor of arts major in sociology and anthropology plus: complete a minor of at least 20 credits in one of the science fields other than sociology and anthropology, or complete a combined science minor, or complete a second major in a bachelor of science degree program, or complete a two-year degree in a science field; and complete eight credits in mathematics, including MATH 1510.

Top


Criminal Justice Studies (B.A.)

A bachelor’s degree in criminal justice studies provides an excellent foundation for students interested in working within the fields of law, corrections, security, probation and parole among others. In addition, it offers thorough preparation for those interested in pursuing a graduate degree in sociology, criminology/criminal justice, law, social work, public administration, public policy, or a closely related field. The criminal justice system is diverse and professionals working within the field must have a solid understanding of matters pertaining to race, gender, and class. The program is designed with this objective in mind. If a minor is required for this degree, students may not minor in Criminal Justice. 

Top


Resources and Facilities

Northern New Mexico provides an outstanding context for social and cultural studies at New Mexico Highlands University. Students may engage in field archaeological digs, ethnographic research, and in practicum experiences. Additionally, students have the opportunity to conduct research in our anthropology lab. Studies of human behavior emphasize field data and computer applications for analysis and interpretation.

Student professional societies and organizations such as the Sociology Club and/or membership in regional or national professional associations provide opportunities for student participation and program enrichment beyond the classroom.

Top


Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal Justice

Associate Degree in Social Behavioral Sciences (AA)
The associate of arts degree in Social and Behavioral Sciences includes courses in general education and in Anthropology, Criminal Justice, Psychology, Sociology or Women’s Studies, constituting a total two-year curriculum. The intent of this program is to provide a foundation that allows for the completion of a Bachelors of Arts degree in approximately two years.

Required courses: 25 credit hours

MATH 1350 Intro to Statistics (3) (counts toward core requirements)
SOCI 1110 Introduction to Sociology (3)
PSYC 1110 Introduction to Psychology (3)
ANTH 1140 Intro to Cultural Anthropology (3)
PSYC 3010 or SOCI/ANTH 3300 Research Methods (3)

Electives: 12 credits in social and behavioral sciences (12)

Major Total: 25 credit hours
Core Total: 35 credit hours
Extended Core: 5 credit hours
Total for Degree: 65 credit hours*

*Total units for the degree may exceed 65 credit hours if proficiency courses are required. The University requires a minimum of 65 credit hours for this degree.

 
Major in Sociology and Anthropology (BA)
Required core: 22 credit hours

SOCI 1110 Introduction to Sociology (3)
ANTH 1140 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3)

OR

ANTH 1215 Introduction to Physical Anthropology and Archaeology (3)
SOCI/ANTH 3000 Sociocultural Theory (3)
SOCI/ANTH 3300 Research Methods Social Relations (3)
SOCI/ANTH 4000 level elective (3)
 

Choose one course from the following:

ANTH 2140 Indigenous Peoples of North America (3)
ANTH 3740 Indian Cultures of Central America (3)
ANTH 4740 Contemporary Indian Issues (3)
ANTH 4760 Indians of the Greater Southwest (3)
ANTH 4770 The Hispanic Southwest (3) 

Choose one course from the following:

SOCI 3230 Deviant Behavior (3)
SOCI 4290 Gender, Society, and Culture (3)
SOCI 4120 Social Stratification (3)
SOCI 4270 Criminology (3)
SOCI 4310 Political Sociology (3)
SOCI 4930 Race and Ethnic Relations (3)

SOCI/ANTH core: 21 credit hours
Emphasis: 21 credit hours minimum*
Minor: 20 credit hours minimum
Core Requirements: 21 credit hours
Flex Requirements: 10 credit hours
Extended Requirements: 8 credit hours
Proficiency Requirements: 11-17 credit hours

General Electives to 120 (if needed): 2-8 credit hours

Total for degree: 120 credit hours

*An emphasis is required (see below). A minor is required. The number of electives to reach the degree total of 120 credit hours will vary by the number of credit hours required by the minor.  The number of proficiency credit requirements will vary based on student placement scores. The University requires a minimum of 45 upper-division units for the degree.

Students must choose an emphasis from the following list to complete the major:

Concentration in American Indian Studies
Required courses: 12 credit hours

ANTH 2140 Indigenous Peoples of North America (3)
ANTH 3740 Indian Cultures of Central America (3)
ANTH 4740 Contemporary Indian Issues (3)
ANTH 4760 Indians of the Southwest (3)

Electives: 9 credit hours
Select in consultation with your adviser.

Emphasis Total: 21 credit hours
Major Total: 43 credit hours
Core Requirements: 21 credit hours
Flex Requirements: 10 credit hours
Extended Requirements: 8 credit hours
Proficiency Requirements: 11-17 credit hours
General Electives to 120 (if needed):  1-7 credit hours

Minor: 20 credit hours minimum

Total for degree: 120 credit hours

*A minor is required. The number of electives to reach the degree total of 120 credit hours will vary by the number of credit hours required by the minor.  The number of proficiency credit requirements will vary based on student placement scores. The University requires a minimum of 45 upper-division units for the degree.
Top

Concentration in Anthropology
Required courses: 9 credit hours

Select one course from each of the following categories:

Physical Anthropology/Archaeology
ANTH 1215 I
ntroduction to Physical Anthropology and Archaeology (3)
ANTH 4100 Method and Theory in Archaeology (3)

Social Cultural Anthropology
ANTH 1140
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3)
ANTH 4150 Development and Sociocultural Change (3)
ANTH 4220 Magic, Witchcraft, and Healing (3)
ANTH 4610 Communication and Culture (3)

Applied Anthropology
ANTH 4420
Forensic Anthropology and Osteology (4)
ANTH 4800 Issues Applied Anthropology (3)
ANTH 4810 Cultural Resource Management (3)
SOCI/ANTH 4560 U.S.-Mexico Immigration: Border Issues (3)

Electives: 12 credit hours
Select in consultation with your adviser.

Emphasis Total: 21 credit hours
Major Total: 43 credit hours
Minor: 20 credit hours minimum
Core Requirements: 21 credit hours
Flex Requirements: 10 credit hours
Extended Requirements: 8 credit hours
Proficiency Requirements: 11-17 credit hours
General Electives to 120 (if needed):  1-7 credit hours

Total for degree: 120 credit hours

*A minor is required. The number of electives to reach the degree total of 120 credit hours will vary by the number of credit hours required by the minor. The number of proficiency credit requirements will vary based on student placement scores. The University requires a minimum of 45 upper-division units for the degree.

Top

Concentration in Criminology
Required courses: 25 credit hours

SOCI 2120 Introduction to Criminal Justice Systems (3)
SOCI 4270 Criminology (3)
SOCI 4280 Global Crime (3)
SOCI 4300 Applied Social Research and Data Analysis (4)
SOCI 4980 Field Experience (1-4)

Select three courses in consultation with your adviser:

SOCI 2310 Contemporary Social Problems (3)

SOCI 3230 Deviant Behavior (3)

SOCI 3270 Juvenile Delinquency and Justice (3)

SOCI 3290 Institutional Corrections (3)

POLS 3140 Introduction to the Law (3)

POLS 3200 Criminal Law (3)

ANTH 4420 Forensic Anthropology and Osteology (4)

ANTH 4610 Communication and Culture (3)

Emphasis Total: 25 credit hours
Major Total: 47 credit hours
Minor: 20 credit hours minimum
Core Requirements: 21 credit hours
Flex Requirements: 10 credit hours
Extended Requirements: 8 credit hours
Proficiency Requirements: 11-17 credit hours
General Electives to 120 (if needed):  1-3 credit hours

Total for degree: 120 credit hours

*A minor is required. The number of electives to reach the degree total of 120 credit hours will vary by the number of credit hours required by the minor.  The number of proficiency credit requirements will vary based on student placement scores. The University requires a minimum of 45 upper-division units for the degree.

Top

Concentration in Sociology
Required courses: 13 credit hours

SOCI 2310 Contemporary Social Problems (3)
SOCI 4120 Social Stratification (3)
SOCI 4300 Applied Social Research and Data Analysis (4)
SOCI 4930 Race and Ethnic Relations (3)

Electives: 9 credit hours
Select in consultation with your adviser.

Emphasis Total: 22 credit hours
Major Total: 44 credit hours
Minor: 20 credit hours minimum
Core Requirements: 21 credit hours
Flex Requirements: 10 credit hours
Extended Requirements: 8 credit hours
Proficiency Requirements: 11-17 credit hours
General Electives to 120 (if needed):  1-6 credit hours

Total for degree: 120 credit hours

*A minor is required. The number of electives to reach the degree total of 120 credit hours will vary by the number of credit hours required by the minor.  The number of proficiency credit requirements will vary based on student placement scores. The University requires a minimum of 45 upper-division units for the degree.

Top

Minor in Anthropology
Required courses: 9 credit hours

SOCI 1110 Introduction to Sociology (3)
ANTH 1140 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3)
SOCI/ANTH 3000 Sociocultural Theory (3)

Electives: 12 credit hours
Select in consultation with your adviser.

Minor Total: 21 credit hours

 Minor in Sociology
Required courses: 9 credit hours

SOCI 1110 Introduction to Sociology (3)
ANTH 1140 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3)
SOCI 3000 Sociocultural Theory (3)

Electives: 12 credit hours
Select in consultation with your adviser.

Minor Total: 21 credit hours

Top


Criminal Justice Studies (BA)
Required core courses: 18 credit hours

SOCI 1110 Introduction to Sociology (3)
SOCI 2120 Introduction to Criminal Justice Systems (3)
SOCI 3270 Juvenile Delinquency and Justice (3)
SOCI 3290 Institutional Corrections (3)
SOCI 4270 Criminology (3)
SOCI 4930 Race and Ethnic Relations (3)

Choose one course in cultural theory (3 credit hours):

SOCI 3000 Sociocultural Theory (3)
SOCI 4390 Classical Sociological Theories (3)
ANTH 3000 Sociocultural Theory (3)

Choose one course in Research Methods 1 (3-4 credit hours):

SOCI/ANTH 3300 Research Methods in Social Relations (4)
PSYC 3010 Psychological Research Methods (4)
SOWK 3300 Research Methods 1 (3)

Choose one course in Research Methods 2 (3-4 credit hours):

SOCI 4300 Applied Social Research and Data Analysis (4)
PSYC 3020 Statistics for the Behavioral Science (4)
SOWK 4300 Research Methods 2 (3)

Top

Elective courses: 18 credit hours

CJUS 3100 Process and Procedure of Criminal Law (3)
POLS 3140 Introduction to the Law (3)
CJUS 3150 Issues in the Criminal Justice System (3)
CJUS 4600 Approaches to Dispute Resolution (3)
PSYC 4080 Drugs and Behavior (3)
PSYC/CJUS 4090 Domestic and Sexual Violence (3)
SOCI/ANTH 4280 Global Crime
ANTH 4420 Forensic Anthropology and Osteology (4)
CJUS 3010 Law Enforcement (3)
CJUS 3820 Terrorism (3)
SOWK 4320 Field Practicum (4)

OR

SOCI 4980 Field Experience (1-4)

 

Major Total: 45-47 credit hours
Minor Total: 20 credit hours minimum
Core Total: 35 credit hours
Extended Core: 5 credit hours
Proficiency/Electives to 120: 13-15 credit hours*

Total for degree: 120 credit hours

Top

Minor in Criminal Justice
Required Core Courses: 15 credit hours

SOCI 1110 Introduction to Sociology (3)
CJUS 1110 Introduction to Criminal Justice Systems (3)
SOCI 3290 Institutional Corrections (3)
SOCI 4270 Criminology (3)
SOCI 4930 Race and Ethnic Relations (3)

OR

SOC 4290 Gender, Culture and Society (3)

OR

SOCI 4120 Social Stratification (3)

Top

Elective Courses: 6 credit hours

CJUS 3100 Process and Procedure of Criminal Law (3)
POLS 3140 Introduction to the Law (3)
CJUS 3150 Issues in the Criminal Justice System (3)
SOCI 3230 Deviant Behavior (3)
CJUS 4600 Approaches to Dispute Resolution (3)
PSYC 4080 Drugs and Behavior (3)
PSYC/CJUS 4090 Domestic and Sexual Violence (3)
SOCI/ANTH 4280 Global Crime (3)
ANTH 4420 Forensic Anthropology and Osteology (4)
CJUS 3010 Law Enforcement (3)
CJUS 3820 Terrorism (3)
SOWK 4320 Field Practicum (4)

*A minor is required. The number of electives to reach the degree total of 120 credit hours will vary by the number of credit hours required by the minor. Additional credit hours may be required to meet the 120 credit degree requirement if proficiency or other required courses are waived for content only. The University requires a minimum of 45 upper-division units for the degree.

Top


Anthropology (ANTH), Courses in

ANTH 1140. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3); Fa, Sp
This is an introductory course that provides an overview of cultural anthropology as a subfield within the broader discipline of anthropology and as a research approach within the social sciences more generally. The course presents core concepts and methods of cultural anthropology that are used to understand the ways in which human beings organize and experience their lives through distinctive cultural practices. More specifically, this course explores social and cultural differences and similarities around the world through a variety of topics such as: language and communication, economics, ways of making a living, marriage and family, kinship and descent, race, ethnicity, political organization, supernatural beliefs, sex and gender, and globalization. This course ultimately aims to present a broad range of perspectives and practices of various cultural groups from across the globe. Previous NMHU ANTH 102. 

ANTH 1215. Introduction to Physical Anthropology and Archaeology (3); Fa, Sp
Introduction to physical anthropology and archaeology in the investigation of the possible origins, distribution, adaptation, and evolution of early humans, up to the rise of civilization in the Old and New Worlds. Beginning today we will embark upon a study of the principles of physical anthropology and archaeology, with a specific focus on our human origins. We will work our way from the earliest possible human ancestors through the development of modern humans and the practices that make us unique among the primates. Previous NMHU ANTH 103. 

ANTH 2140. Indigenous Peoples of North America (3); Var
This course is a general survey of the history and ethnology of indigenous groups in North America. The course is designed to give students a comprehensive view of major issues pertaining to the indigenous cultures of North America, such as family structure, social organization, subsistence and contemporary economies, environmental adaptation, Indian-White relations, religious practices, and contemporary issues. Previous NMHU ANTH 274. 

ANTH 2350 – 4350. Selected Topic in Anthropology (I-4 VC); Var
Course in a topic or topics in anthropology. May be repeated with change of content. Previous ANTH 235-435. 

ANTH 2990. Independent Research (3); Var
Individual, directed research arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU ANTH 299. 

ANTH 3000. Sociocultural Theory (3); Fa
Survey of principal developments of sociocultural theory that have contributed to the emergence, development and consolidation of the disciplines of anthropology and sociology.  Prerequisites: SOCI 1110, and any 3000-4000 Anthropology, Criminal Justice, or Sociology course. Previous NMHU ANTH 300. 

ANTH 3030. Anthropological Theory (3); Var
A survey of the major directions in contemporary American and Western European anthropology. Prerequisite: One introductory course in sociology or anthropology. Previous NMHU ANTH 303. 

ANTH 3300. Research Methods in Social Relations (3); Fa
This course is the first in the series of methodology courses offered by sociology. The course examines the ways in which social scientist investigates society and social phenomena. Student will be led through some of the same reasoning that researchers use whey they think about doing their work in a professional setting. Students will learn how to survey and identify major research issues and methods using both quantitative and qualitative studies. The main objective of this course is to develop an interest among students to challenge ideas that are presented as fact and be able ask questions related to the research process (including design, sampling, data gathering and generalization issues). Students are expected to be able to apply their understanding of the research process to answer questions they find interesting by adopting appropriate methodology. Communicating their findings from various projects is essential. Topics covered include research design, measurement, sampling techniques, surveys, experiments, field research, unobtrusive research measure, applied research, and an introduction to data analysis and report writing. Previous ANTH 330. 

ANTH 3520. Laboratory Research (I-3 VC); Var
Research experience in the anthropology laboratory. May be repeated. Previous NMHU ANTH 352. 

ANTH 3740. Indian Cultures of Central America (3); Var
A study of the native people, cultures, and culture areas of Central America. Prerequisite: One introductory course in sociology or anthropology. Previous NHU ANTH 374. 

ANTH 3980. Anthropological Field Studies (2-4 VC); Var
Ethnological and/or archaeological field studies in selected sites. The destination and time in the field vary and are announced at the time of offering. A preparation session before departure is required. Previous NMHU ANTH 398. 

ANTH 4100. Method and Theory in Archaeology (3); 2, 2 Var
The purpose, techniques, methods and theory of archaeology in the study of the human past and in the context of modern science. Prerequisites: ANTH 1140 and 103 or Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU ANTH 410. 

ANTH 4110. People and Plants in Prehistory (3); Var
The question of subsistence is central to every archaeological inquiry. The specialized field of paleoethnobotany allows us to infer dietary habits from charred plant remains recovered during archaeological excavations. This course familiarizes students with field methods employed in the recovery of botanical remains (samplings, flotation, capture, and drying) and lab methods used to identify and interpret them. Special emphasis will be placed on identifying wild and domestic plants used by prehistoric peoples of northeastern New Mexico. Previous NMHU ANTH 411. 

ANTH 4120. Lithic Technology and Analysis (3); Var
This course familiarizes students with the study of stone tools in archaeological contexts. We wish to learn from which materials these tools were made, the techniques that were employed, and how they came to be discarded to become part of the archaeological record. We also wish to know from where the materials came and what properties caused them to be selected for the purpose or purposes for which they were chosen. Accordingly, the course is broken into four general areas: geology, technology, analysis, and interpretation. Previous NMHU ANTH 412.

 ANTH 4130. Archaeology of the Southwest (3); 2, 2 Var
Study of prehistoric cultures, before 1500, of the greater Southwest and Northern New Mexico. Prerequisite: One introductory course in sociology or anthropology. Previous ANTH 413. 

ANTH 4140. Field Methods in Archaeology (2-6 VC); Su
Instruction in archaeology field and laboratory techniques and methods. Prerequisite: ANTH 4100 or Permission of instructor. Previous ANTH 414. 

ANTH 4150. Development and Sociocultural Change (3); Var
This course concerns the nature and consequences of development and culture change. The focus is on contemporary issues and the many ways in which anthropology is used outside its purely academic context: how anthropology is applied to contemporary human issues, how it benefits society, and how it advances theoretical knowledge. Prerequisite: One introductory course in anthropology or sociology. Cross-listed as: SOC 4150. Previous NMHU ANTH 415. 

ANTH 4160. Ceramic Analysis (3); Var
The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with pottery-making in prehistoric contexts, the geology and petrography involved, stylistic and iconographic themes, and how to analyze a prehistoric ceramic assemblage. Accordingly, the course is divided into several general areas: geology and the mineralogical and chemical makeup of clays; history of ceramic manufacture and trade; technological production of pottery including clay sources, vessel properties, shape, form, function and design; and the uses of style in questions of social ties and affiliations. Prerequisites: ANTH 1140 and ANGH 1215. 

ANTH 4180. Beliefs and Practices Among Southwest Native Americans (3); Var
This course provides an overview of Southwest Native Americans beliefs and practice. It will focus on the sacred ecology, mythology, world view, ritual and dance complex of a number of diverse tribes within the American Southwest. Southwest Native American and practices will be placed within the larger historical and contemporary social, political, and cultural contexts. Previous NMHU ANTH 418. 

ANTH 4200. Anthropology Goes to the Movies (3); Var
The course features ethnographic films that explore cross-cultural themes about identities (race-ethnicity, nationality, political organization, religion, gender, class, sexuality, and so on) primarily through film and secondarily through ethnographic texts. Course readings, films, class lectures and discussions will examine the themes of cinematic (visual and auditory) manipulation of audience’s perceptions and interpretations, research and ethics and accountabilities, and the politics of ethnographic representation. Students will learn about film in anthropology by viewing and discussing films that reflect various anthropological principles. Thinking about anthropology films will require talking and writing about the subject. Previous NMHU ANTH 420. 

ANTH 4220. Magic, Witchcraft, and Healing (3); Var
The course addresses the origins, elements, forms, and symbolism of religion, provides a comparative survey of religious beliefs, myths, practices and symbolism, and focuses on religion in the context of culture, and teaches the appreciation of religious differences. Prerequisite: One introductory course in sociology or anthropology. Cross-listed as: SOC 4220.  Previous NMHU ANTH 422. 

ANTH 4280. Global Crime (3); Fa
This course is sociological and anthropological analysis of social control and law in a variety of social, cultural and global contexts. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110 and 2120. Previous NMHU ANTH 428. 

ANTH 4290. Gender, Culture, and Society (3); Var
This course provides a foundation for understanding gender as expressed within and influenced by society. Cross-culturally, men and women are perceived as different; often as opposites. This perception can affect the quality of life, both on a structural level (in terms of wages earned, jobs held) and on an interpersonal level (in terms of expression of self/autonomy). Various theoretical perspectives are explored to understand why this perception of difference exists, how it translates into inequality, and how it is learned. Previous NMHU ANTH 429. 

ANTH 4420. Forensic Anthropology and Osteology (4); 3, 2 Var
Presentation and application of biological anthropology techniques in the identification of humans from skeletal remains. Previous NMHU ANTH 442. 

ANTH 4500. Seminar in Anthropology (1-4 VC); Var
Seminar in anthropology. May be repeated which a change in topic. Previous NMHU ANTH 450. 

ANTH 4540. Women and Globalization (3); Var
This course examines how women’s lives are shaped by globalization through the feminization of labor and migration, environmental degradation, diaspora, sexuality, cultural displacement, and militarization. It explores the ways women have confronted these conditions as well as the possibilities and challenges of cross-border feminist coalitions. Previous NMHU ANTH 454. 

ANTH 4560. U.S.-Mexico Immigration: Border Issues (3); Var
Socially and culturally, economically and demographically no international process has affected everyday life in the United States more than Mexican immigration. The course will examine the evolution, expansion and maintenance of processes and structures that have come to institutionalize the unspoken immigration “agreements” between these two nations. Previous NMHU ANTH 456. 

ANTH 4610. Communication and Culture (3); Fa
Anthropological linguistics, focusing on investigations of the relationships between language and culture. Prerequisite: One introductory course in sociology or anthropology. Previous NMHU ANTH 461. 

ANTH 4740. Contemporary Indian Issues (3); Var
An examination of emerging social and cultural issues in today’s American Indian society. Previous NMHU ANTH 474. 

ANTH 4760. Indians of the Greater Southwest (3); Var
A survey of the Native American cultures in the greater Southwest since 1500, including both Pueblo and non-Pueblo cultures. Prerequisite: One introductory course in sociology or anthropology. Previous NMHU ANTH 476. 

ANTH 4770. The Hispanic Southwest (3); Var
An ethnohistorical and socioanthropological examination of Spanish-speaking people in the Southwest from their establishment to contemporary times. Previous NMHU ANTH 477. 

ANTH 4800. Issues in Applied Anthropology (3); Var
This course focuses on what applied anthropology is, how it is done, how it benefits society, and how it advances anthropology’s theoretical knowledge of culture and society. It is also for students who are interested in learning about the various ways in which anthropology is used outside the academia. Previous NMHU ANTH 480. 

ANTH 4810. Cultural Resource Management (3); Var
This course provides students with the foundations for conducting cultural resource management (CRM). It addresses laws, regulations, agencies, and techniques needed for conducting CRM work and practical experience. Prerequisite: One Culture Area course. Previous NMHU ANTH 481. 

ANTH 4900. Independent Study (I-4 VC); Var
Individual, directed study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU ANTH 490.

ANTH 4990. Independent Research (I-4 VC); Var
Individual, directed research arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU ANTH 499.

Top

 


Criminal Justice (CJUS), Courses in

CJUS 2350 – 4350. Selected Topic in Criminal Justice (3); Var
Course in a topic or topics in criminal justice. May be repeated with a change of content. Previous NMHU CJS 235-435. 

CJUS 3010. Law Enforcement (3); Var
This course examines society’s evolving responses to crime from the perspective of law enforcement agencies and officers. This course will explore the evolution of American policing from its roots in England to its current form. Topics will include community-oriented policing, problem-oriented policing, victimology, and the culture of police community. Prerequisites: SOCI 1110 and SOCI 2120. Previous NMHU CJS 301. 

CJUS 3100. Process and Procedures of Criminal Law (3); Var
This course examines processes and procedures of the American legal system. The primary focus is on the American adversarial system of criminal law and alternatives to these systems of law and justice. The adversarial system will be compared with the inquisitorial criminal and civil codes of Continental Europe. Previous CJS 310. 

CJUS 3150. Issues in the Criminal Justice System (3); Var
This course provides an advanced exploration of issues currently impacting law enforcement, models of adult and juvenile corrections, and the judicial system. The course is designed to provide students with in-depth knowledge of the interdependence of the components of the criminal justice system continuum. The type and effectiveness of rehabilitative efforts and constitutional requirements for mental and medical health care will be examined. Previous NMHU CJS 315. 

CJUS 3810. Terrorism (3); Var
This course critically examines the historical foundations of contemporary international terrorism, theories of its causes, its control, and the consequences of implementing those controls. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110 and SOCI 2240. 

CJUS 4090. Domestic and Sexual Violence (3); Var
This course focuses on physical, sexual, and emotional abuse that occurs within families. A particular emphasis will be a focus on the psychological consequences of exposure to physical and sexual trauma and neglect. Victim and offender characteristics will be discussed in the context of family dynamics. Typical and potential criminal justice system responses will be explored. Previous NMHU CJS 409. 

CJUS 4600. Approaches to Dispute Resolution (3); Var
This course provides a theoretical and practical understanding of dispute resolution processes in use in the private and public sectors. The course examines how and why dispute resolution processes function in particular environments, and critiques the strengths and weaknesses of each process. Prerequisite: Introductory course in psychology or introductory course in sociology. Previous NMHU CJS 460. 

CJUS 4900. Independent Study in Criminal Justice (1-4VC); Var
Individual study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU CJS 490.

Top


Sociology (SOCI), Courses in

SOCI 1110. Introduction to Sociology (3); Fa, Sp
This course will introduce students to the basic concepts and theories of sociology, as well as to the methods utilized in sociological research. The course will address how sociological concepts and theories can be utilized to analyze and interpret our social world, and how profoundly our society and the groups to which students belong influence them. Students will be given the opportunity to challenge their “taken for granted” or “common sense” understandings about society, social institutions, and social issues. Special attention will also be paid to the intimate connections between their personal lives and the larger structural features of social life. In addition, the implications of social inequalities, such as race/ethnicity, gender, and social class will be central to the course’s examination of social life in the United States. Previous NMHU SOC 152. 

SOCI 2120. Introduction to Criminal Justice Systems (3); Fa
This course provides an introduction to social issues that are currently affecting the criminal justice system in the United States. The course will cover the history of the US criminal justice system and how our system compares with other countries. We will address how the U.S. criminal justice system attempts to create and preserve a balance between sustaining order, maintaining individual rights, and promoting justice. Important themes also include, but are not limited to discussions of how crime and delinquency are measured, key correlates of crime, sociological approaches to researching crime, sociological theories of crime, the quality of crime data in the U.S. and how it is used to make public policy decisions, and the causes and consequences of mass incarceration in the United States. Previous NMHU SOC 231. 

SOCI 2225. Introduction to Women’s Studies (3); Fa
This course is designed to help students identify, understand and defuse gender stereotypes and barriers. A control goal is to empower women to take charge of their own lives. Topics include: sexuality, socialization, self-esteem, leadership, motherhood and transcending victimization models of feminism and femininity.  Previous NMHU SOC 200. Cross-listed with GNDR 2110. 

SOCI 2240. Sociology of Intimate Relationship and Family (3); Var
This course provides an overview of contemporary intimate relationships and families from sociological perspectives. We will examine intimate relationships and families as social constructions whose meanings have changed over time and from place to place. This course will aid students in developing a greater understanding of intimate relationships and families as institutions in contemporary U.S. society. Intersections of race, class, gender, sexual orientation, nationality, and other factors within these institutions will be addressed. 

SOCI 2310. Contemporary Social Problems (3); Var
This course studies the nature, scope, and effects of social problems and their solutions. The course will concentrate on sociological perspectives, theories, and key concepts when investigating problems, such as inequality, poverty, racism, alienation, family life, sexuality, gender, urbanization, work, aging, crime, war and terrorism, environmental degradation, and mass media. This course is designed to build students’ sociological understanding of how sociological approaches attempt to clarify various issues confronting contemporary life, as well as how sociologists view solutions to these problems. Previous NMHU SOC 283. 

SOCI 2350 – 4350. Selected Topic in Sociology (I-4 VC); Var
Course in a topic or topics in sociology. May be repeated with change of content. Previous NMHU SOC 235-435. 

SOCI 3000. Sociocultural Theory (3); Fa
Survey of principal developments of sociocultural theory that have contributed to the emergence, development and consolidation of the disciplines of anthropology and sociology.  Prerequisites: SOCI 1110, and any 3000-4000 Anthropology, Criminal Justice, or Sociology course. Previous NMHU SOC 300.

SOCI 3230. Deviant Behavior (3); Var
Analysis of behavior that deviates from institutionalized expectations, by using specific sociological theory and method. Previous NMHU SOC 323. 

SOCI 3270. Juvenile Delinquency and Justice (3); Fa
An overview of definitions and social theories of delinquency and an analysis of the legal system for processing juvenile offenders in the United States; special consideration of juvenile justice in New Mexico. Previous NMHU SOC 327.

SOCI 3290. Institutional Corrections (3); Sp
A sociological analysis of the role of jails and prisons in the criminal justice system and larger society in the United States; emphasis on operation of adult correctional facilities, from perspective of both staff and inmates, with special consideration of institutional corrections in New Mexico. Previous NMHU SOC 329. 

SOCI 3300. Research Methods in Social Relations (3); Fa
The social context, structure of inquiry, and modes of observation in research of social and cultural phenomena. Prerequisite: One introductory course in sociology or anthropology. Cross-listed as: ANTH 3300. Previous NMHU SOC 330. 

SOCI 4100. Sociology of Sexuality (3); Var
This course will look at historical perceptions, practices and reactions to sexuality.  As the course progresses, it will focus more closely on particular social contexts and notions of power. prerequisites: SOCI 1110. 

SOCI 4120. Social Stratification (3); Sp
Differentiation, status, social mobility, class, and caste in selected societies. Prerequisite: One introductory course in sociology or anthropology. Previous NMHU SOC 412. 

SOCI 4140. Race, Ethnicity, and Policing (3); Var
A thorough overview of the various ways in which racial stratification in the U.S. impacts current policing methods. A critical approach to racial profiling, excessive force, surveillance technology, community cooperation, and community policing, with an exploration of constructive ways in which best practices can be identified and applied. Prerequisites: SOCI 1110. 

SOCI 4150. Development and Sociocultural Change (3); Var
This course concerns the nature and consequences of development and culture change as understood by social scientists. Course will address theoretical orientations, consequences of development, and case studies. Prerequisite: One introductory course in sociology or anthropology. Cross-listed as: ANTH 4150. Previous NMHU SOC 415. 

SOCI 4220. Magic, Witchcraft, and Healing (3); Var
The origins, elements, forms, and symbolism of religion including a comparative survey of religious beliefs, myths, practices, and symbolism. Course focuses on religion in the context of culture with an emphasis on appreciating religious differences. Prerequisite: One introductory course in sociology or anthropology. Cross-listed as: ANTH 4220. Previous NMHU SOC 422. 

SOCI 4270. Criminology (3); Sp
An overview of definitions and types of crime, and social theories of crime causation; special issues related to crime, crime control, and crime prevention. Prerequisites: SOCI 1110 and 2120, and senior classification.  Previous NMHU SOC 427. 

SOCI 4280. Global Crime (3); Fa
This course is a sociological and anthropological analysis of social control and law in a variety of social, cultural, and global contexts. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110 and SOCI 2120. Previous NMHU SOC 428. 

SOCI 4290. Gender, Culture, and Society (3); Var
This course provides a foundation for understanding gender as expressed within and influenced by society. Cross culturally men and women are perceived as different, often as opposites. This perception can affect the quality of life, both on a structural level (in terms of wages earned, jobs held) and on an interpersonal level (in terms of expression of self/autonomy). Various theoretical perspectives are explored in order to understand why this perception of difference exists, how it translates into inequality and how it is learned. Previous NMHU SOC 429. 

SOCI 4300. Applied Social Research and Data Analysis (4); 3, 2 Sp
Instruction in and application of techniques used in the analysis of quantitative and qualitative social science research data. Prerequisite: SOC 3300 or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU SOC 430. 

SOCI 4310. Political Sociology (3); Var
Sociological theory and research as applied to the study of political behavior, including such topics as the social bases of power (class, occupation, religion, cultural values), decision-making, leadership and communications. Previous NMHU SOC 431. 

SOCI 4390. Introduction to Contemporary Sociological Theories (3); Sp
Introduction to and analysis of contemporary sociological theories. Previous NMHU SOC 439. 

SOCI 4500. Seminar in Sociology (1-4 VC); Var
Seminar course is a topic or topics in sociology: may be repeated with change of content. Previous NMHU SOC 450. 

SOCI 4540. Women and Globalization (3); Var
This course examines how women’s lives are shaped by globalization through the feminization of labor and migration, environmental degradation, diaspora, sexuality, cultural displacement, and militarization. It explores the ways women have confronted these conditions as well as the possibilities and challenges of cross-border feminist coalitions. Previous NMHU SOC 454. 

SOCI 4900. Independent Study (I -4 VC); Var
Independent study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU SOC 490. 

SOCI 4930. Race and Ethnic Relations (3); Sp
The basic processes operating in the present day interrelations of ethnic groups. Previous NMHU SOC 493. 

SOCI 4980. Field Experience (1-4 VC); Var
A field placement in a local service agency providing opportunity for observation and learning under staff supervision. May be taken twice for credit. Prerequisite: Senior classification in sociology or criminal justice, and permission of instructor. Previous NMHU SOC 498. 

SOCI 4990. Independent Research (I-4 VC); Var
An individual, directed research investigation arranged with an instructor on a topic of mutual interest to the student and the instructor. Projects require a final written report that includes a presentation of the problem, review of the literature, description of procedures, data analysis, and interpretation of results. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. One introductory course in sociology or anthropology. Previous NMHU SOC 499.

Top


This department is under the College of Arts and Sciences