image of wilson complex basketball courtbackground image of pine treependant background imageheader image of librarypurple background imageimage of stair wellimage of student union builingimage of gutterImage of ceilingImage of ceiling of the wilson complex buildingimage of wall in Tech buildingimage of swimming poolimage of ceilingimage of window at Studnet union buildingWall imageImage of window at science buildingImage of window at science buildingImage of stairs in science buildingImage of interior of science buildingImage of science buildingImage of science buildingImage of library buildingImage of buildingbackground image of ceiling

Suicide Prevention

NMHU- CARES after-hours: (505)795-366

Campus Police: (505)454-3278

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is: free, confidential, and offers 24/7 services: 1-800-273-8255

Understanding the issues concerning suicide and mental health is an important way to take part in suicide prevention, help others in crisis, and change the conversation around suicide.

YOU ARE NOT ALONE

How To Take Care Of Yourself

Ask for help: Don’t be afraid to let your friends, family, or teachers know what you need when they ask; they want to help. You can also call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline any time — calls are confidential.

Make a safety plan: A safety plan can help guide you through difficult moments and keep you safe. Learn how to make your own: https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/help-yourself/

Remember that this feeling can be overcome: Family conflict, relationships, grades, sexual identity, and the loss of important people can seem impossible to deal with. But with support from others, you can.

Evaluate the relationships in your life: Love and friendship are all about respect. Toxic or unhealthy relationships can negatively affect you. Whether you’re dating or building new friendships, remember your rights.

How To Help

Take your loved one seriously: Some people feel that kids who say they are going to hurt or kill themselves are “just doing it for attention.” But if your child,  friend, or family member confides thoughts of suicide, believe them and get help.

Listen with empathy and provide support: A fight or breakup might not seem like a big deal, but for a young person it can feel immense. Sympathize and listen. Minimizing what your child or friend is going through can increase his or her sense of hopelessness.

Learn the warning signs: Friends sometimes let friends know if they are thinking about suicide or dying. Other times, changes in behavior may show that someone is struggling.

Don’t keep suicide a secret: If your friend is considering suicide, don’t promise to keep it a secret. Tell him or her you can help, but you need to involve other people, like a trusted adult. Neither of you have to face this alone.

The Warning Signs

  • Talking about wanting to die or to kill themselves
  • Looking for a way to kill themselves, like searching online or buying a gun
  • Talking about feeling hopeless or having no reason to live
  • Talking about feeling trapped or in unbearable pain
  • Talking about being a burden to others
  • Increasing the use of alcohol or drugs
  • Acting anxious or agitated; behaving recklessly
  • Sleeping too little or too much
  • Withdrawing or isolating themselves
  • Showing rage or talking about seeking revenge
  • Extreme mood swings

Risk Factors

  • Mental disorders, particularly mood disorders, schizophrenia, anxiety disorders, and certain personality disorders
  • Alcohol and other substance use disorders
  • Hopelessness
  • Impulsive and/or aggressive tendencies
  • History of trauma or abuse
  • Major physical illnesses
  • Previous suicide attempt(s)
  • Family history of suicide
  • Job or financial loss

https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/how-we-can-all-prevent-suicide/)