Virtual Homecoming October 19-24 2020

Virtual Homecoming October 19-24 2020

Department of Forestry Undergraduate Requirements

Dr. Joshua L. Sloan, Department Chair and Assistant Professor
Ivan Hilton Science Center, Room 335
Phone: 505-454-3208
Fax: 505-454-3103
Email: jlsloan@nmhu.edu

About
The Department of Forestry houses the Forestry and Conservation Management programs. Areas of study focus on the management of forest and rangeland ecosystems, the natural resources and biodiversity they contain, and the ecosystem services they provide. Programs emphasize the sustainable adaptive management of forests and rangeland through the application of ecological principles and knowledge, in conjunction with an understanding of economics, human dimensions, and law and policy. The Department of Forestry offers instructional programs leading to a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Forestry, a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) in Conservation Management, and minors in Wildland Fire and Wildlife Management. The NMHU Forestry program is accredited by the Society of American Foresters and is the only accredited Forestry program in the State of New Mexico.

Mission of the Department of Forestry
The mission of the Department of Forestry is to engage in teaching, research, and service in forestry to promote the sustainable management of forest resources. The Forestry teaching program seeks to enhance the competency and excellence of the forestry profession. The undergraduate Forestry degree program is designed to educate well-rounded, technologically proficient, and ecologically aware forest managers, providing them with a background sufficient to enable them to support the continued health, integrity, and use of forests for the benefit of society. Being part of a Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI), the Forestry program seeks to address the needs of underrepresented students in the forestry profession.

Resources and Facilities
The Department of Forestry is housed in the Ivan Hilton Science and Technology Building. Modern classrooms and spacious laboratories showcase state-of-the-art analytical equipment and modern safety features and provide students with hands-on, student-centered learning environments.

Faculty

James Biggs, Ph.D. (Forestry)

Blanca Cespedes, Ph.D. (Forestry)

Jennifer Klutsch, Ph.D. (Forestry)

Kyle Shaney, Ph.D. (Forestry)

Joshua L. Sloan, Ph.D. (Forestry)

Julie Tsatsaros, Ph.D. (Water Science, Forestry)

Joseph P. Zebrowski (Geographic Information Science, Forestry)

Forestry (B.S.)
Forestry is the application of scientific principles to the sustainable management of forest resources, including a wide range of ecosystem services (e.g., non-timber forest products, wildlife, medicinal herbs, and craft materials), fresh water, and biodiversity. The primary goal of the forestry program is to train technically competent forest and natural resources managers who understand the ecological notions that underpin human use of forest resources. Graduates of the Forestry Program meet all federal requirements for employment as a professional forester. Students receive training in the various techniques used to determine resource quantities and qualities, economic values, and social constraints in the management of natural resources. Students who major in forestry are not required to take a minor. A summer field course is required of all students prior to their graduation. Students who wish to pursue graduate degrees should talk to an
adviser about recommended coursework.

The B.S. in Forestry offers two concentrations of study – Forestry Management and Wildland Fire. The Forestry Management concentration focuses on the management of timber as well as a wide range of ecosystem services produced by private and public lands. The Wildland Fire program, one of the few in the country, offers state of the art instruction in the use and management of fire on the broad landscapes of the west. In this era of rapid environmental change, these forestry fields are in increasing demand. After graduation, New Mexico Highlands University forestry students are prepared to meet that demand and embark on exciting and rewarding careers. The NMHU Forestry Program is provisionally accredited by the Society of American Foresters.

Conservation Management (B.A.)
Conservation Management provides students with skills to integrate the diverse array of social, political, legal, institutional, cultural, economic, ecological, and biophysical considerations inherent in attaining environmental and resource management goals. This degree prepares students for a variety of careers in research, industry, education, government, or public service. Students must complete a total of 43 to 46 hours in anthropology, biology, chemistry, forestry, and geology. New Mexico Highlands University requires at least 45 credit hours in upper (3000-4000 level) courses. The BA in Conservation Management requires completion of a minor.

Major in Forestry (BS)

Concentration in Forestry Management
Required Courses: 54 credit hours
FORS 1010 Ecosystems and Humans (4)
FORS 2990 Forestry Field Practice (4)
FORS 2110 Terrestrial Ecology (4)
FORS 2120 Water Resources (3)
FORS 3050 Natural Resources Economics (3)
FORS 3070 Wildland Fire Management (3)
FORS 3100 Mensuration and Biometrics (3)
FORS 3130 Dendrology (3)
FORS 3300 Natural Resources Law and Policy (3)
OR
GEOL 4120 Geologic Resources, Law and Environmental Policy
(3)
FORS 3400 Quantitative Methods (3)
FORS 4020 Silviculture (3)
FORS 4100 Forest Management (3)
FORS 4120 Surveying and Geographic Information Systems (4)
FORS 4160 Soil Science (4)
FORS 4240 Wildland Pest Management (3)
FORS 4260 Professional Ethics (1)
FORS 4920 Applied Forestry Research (3)

Additional requirements: 16-17 credits
BIOL 3030 Plant Structure and Function (4)
CHEM 1215 General Chemistry 1 for STEM Majors (3)
CHEM 1215L Chemistry Lab 1 for STEM Majors (2)
GEOL 1110 Physical Geology (4)
MATH 1430 Applications of Calculus 1 (3)
OR
MATH 1510 Calculus 1 (4)

Electives: 6-8 credits hours
(In consultation with academic advisor,
students may choose from FORS 4000, 4080, 4170, 4180, 4200,
4330, 4510, 4520, 4530, 4560, or 4610.)

Major Total: 76 – 79 credit hours
Core Requirements: 21 credit hours
Flex Requirements: 10 credit hours
Extended Requirements: 8 credit hours
Proficiency Requirements: 11-17 credit hours

Total for degree: 126-135 credit hours*
*A minor is not required. Additional credit hours may be required
to meet the total degree credit requirement if proficiency or other
required courses are waived for content only. English and math

proficiency credit do not count toward the total degree credit requirement. New Mexico Highlands University requires a minimum of 45 upper-division units for the degree.

Concentration in Wildland Fire
Required Courses: 64 credit hours
FORS 1010 Ecosystems and Humans (4)
FORS 2990 Forestry Field Practice (4)
FORS 2110 Terrestrial Ecology (4)
FORS 2120 Water Resources (3)
FORS 3050 Natural Resources Economics (3)
FORS 3070 Wildland Fire Management (3)
FORS 3100 Mensuration and Biometrics (3)
FORS 3130 Dendrology (3)
FORS 3300 Natural Resources Law and Policy (3) OR GEOL
4120 Geologic Resources, Law and Environmental Policy (3)
FORS 3400 Quantitative Methods (3)
FORS 4020 Silviculture (3)
FORS 4100 Forest Management (3)
FORS 4120 Surveying and Geographic Information Systems (4)
FORS 4160 Soil Science (4)
FORS 4240 Wildland Pest Management (3)
FORS 4260 Professional Ethics (1)
FORS 4510 Project Fire and Rehabilitation (3)
FORS 4520 Prescribed Fire Practices (4)
FORS 4560 Fire and Landscape Ecology (3)
FORS 4920 Applied Forestry Research (3)

Additional Requirements: 16 – 17 credits
BIOL 3030 Plant Structure and Function (4)
CHEM 1215 General Chemistry 1 for STEM Majors (3)
CHEM 1215L Chemistry Lab 1 for STEM Majors (2)
GEOL 1110 Physical Geology (4)
MATH 1430 Applications of Calculus 1 (3)
OR
MATH 1510 Calculus 1 (4)

Electives: 3-6 credits hours
(In consultation with academic advisor, students may choose from
FORS 4000, 4080, 4170, 4180, 4200, 4330, 4510, 4520, 4530,
4560, or 4610.)

Major Total: 83-87 credit hours
Core Requirements: 21 credit hours
Flex Requirements: 10 credit hours
Extended Requirements: 8 credit hours
Proficiency Requirements: 11-17 credit hours

Total for degree: 133-143 credit hours*
*A minor is not required. The number of proficiency credit

requirements will vary based on student placement scores. New Mexico Highlands University requires a minimum of 45 upper-division units for the degree.

Major in Conservation Management (BA)

CORE: 34 credit hours
FORS 1010 Ecosystems and Humans (4)
FORS 2110 Terrestrial Ecology (4)
FORS 2120 Water Resources (3)
FORS 3050 Natural Resources Economics (3)
FORS 3300 Natural Resources Law and Policy (3) OR

GEOL 4120 Geologic Resources, Law and Environmental Policy (3)
FORS 3400 Quantitative Methods (3)
FORS 4120 Survey and GIS (4)
FORS 4260 Professional Ethics (1)
BIOL 2120 General Biology (4)
CHEM 1215 General Chemistry (3)
CHEM 1215L General Chemistry Lab (2)

Electives: 9-12 credit hours

Upper-division electives from forestry, geology, biology or anthropology chosen in consultation with your adviser.

Major Total: 43 – 46 credit hours

Core Requirements: 21 credit hours
Flex Requirements: 10 credit hours
Extended Requirements: 8 credit hours
Proficiency Requirements: 11-17 credit hours
General Electives to 120 (if needed): 4-7 credit hours
Minor: 20 credit hours minimum

Total for degree: 120 credit hours*
*A minor is required. The number of proficiency credit requirements
will vary based on student placement scores. New Mexico Highlands University requires a minimum of 45 upper-division units for the degree.

Minor in Wildland Fire
Required Courses: 18 credit hours
FORS 1010 Ecosystems and Humans (4)*
FORS 2110 Terrestrial Ecology (4)*
FORS 3070 Wildland Fire Management (3)
FORS 4560 Fire and Landscape Ecology (3)
*Select an additional elective for each if course is used for the major.

Choose one:
FORS 4510 Project Fires and Post-Fire Rehabilitation (3)
FORS 4520 Prescribed Fire Practices (4)
Electives: 1 – 9 depending on major*
*Choose electives in consultation with minor adviser.

Minor Total: 18 credits hours

Minor in Wildlife Management
Required Courses: 18 credit hours
FORS 1010 Ecosystems and Humans (4)*
FORS 2110 Terrestrial Ecology (4)*
FORS 3170 Principles of Wildlife Management (3)
FORS 4200 Wildlife Habitat Management (3)
BIOL 4940 Field Zoology (3)
*Select an additional elective for each if course is used for the major.

Electives: 1 – 9 depending on major*
*Choose electives in consultation with minor adviser.

Minor Total: 18 credits hour

Forestry (FORS), Courses in 

FORS 1010. Ecosystems and Humans (4); 3, 2 Fa, Sp
A survey of environmental and ecological sciences with an introduction to the ways humans interact with and change ecosystems. The course introduces students to ecological and environmental concepts that bear on environmental issues, the current practices and management strategies utilized to preserve and sustain ecosystems, and examples of solutions to environmental and natural resources problems. Previous NMHU FOR 105. 

FORS 1350-4350. ST: Selected Topic in Forestry (1-4 VC); Var
Course in a topic or topics in forestry. May be repeated with a change in course content. Previous NMHU FOR 135-435. 

FORS 2110. Terrestrial Ecology (4); 3, 2 Fa
The ecology of natural and artificial groups of terrestrial organisms used in the production of goods and services is the focus of this course. Topics include biological productivity, vegetation dynamics, biodiversity, range ecosystems, forest ecosystems, and pest populations. Prerequisite: FORS 1010. Previous NMHU FOR 231. 

FOR 2120. Water Resources (3); Fa, Sp
This course will explore the social, economic, environmental, historical, and technological forces that have led to our current methods of water distribution, management, and policy throughout the world. A strong historical context will be used throughout the course with a focus on New Mexico, Colorado, and the West. While the course will focus on the West, other areas of the U.S. and world will be examined as appropriate. Prerequisite: FORS 1010 or instructor permission. Previous NMHU FOR 237. 

FORS 2900-4900. Independent Study (1-6 VC); Fa, Sp, Su
Individual directed study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU FOR 290-490. 

FORS 2990. Forestry Field Practices (4); 1, 6 Fa
This course is an intensive summer experience in which various forest types in New Mexico are visited. Forest management practices, harvest systems, and natural catastrophes will be assessed by students for their ecological repercussions. Measurement methods used in forestry will be introduced throughout the session. This course provides training to students in the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s heavy equipment and field operations regulations, safe practices for field workers, and risk management and liability issues surrounding field work. Previous NMHU FOR 200. 

FORS 3050. Natural Resources Economics (3); Sp
This course provides an overview of the market economy in development and allocation of scarce resources, the economic impacts of policy measures used in natural resource systems, and the achievement of achieving environmental goals. Prerequisites: FORS 2110 and ECON 2120. Previous NMHU FOR 305. 

FORS 3070. Wildland Fire Management (3); Fa
This is a course on the behavior of wildfires in forest and range communities. Methods of prescribed fire use are discussed. This course reviews methods for fuel load estimation, fire weather prediction, and fire suppression. Prerequisite: FORS 2110 or instructor permission. Previous NMHU FOR 307. 

FORS 3100. Mensuration and Biometrics (3); Fa
Mensuration is the practice of measuring lengths and angles. Biometrics is the set of techniques for measurement and analysis of biological phenomena. Together, these topics provide a comprehensive overview of measurement and analysis techniques used in life science and allied disciplines. Prerequisite or corequisite: FORS 3400. Previous NMHU FOR 310.

FORS 3130. Dendrology (3); Fa
Dendrology studies the biology of trees and woody vegetation. This course explores tree and shrub identification with associated botanical nomenclature as well as the structure and function of shrub and tree morphology. A collection of local trees and shrubs is a requirement for the course. Prerequisite: FORS 2110 or instructor permission. Previous NMHU FOR 313.

FORS 3170. Principles of Wildlife Management (3); Fa
This course will provide an overview of ecological principles used in the management of various groups of wildlife, the history and development of wildlife management as a science, characteristics of, and factors affecting wildlife populations, techniques and theories of management, and wildlife conservation. Prerequisites: FORS 1010 and FORS 2110. Previous NMHU FOR 317. 

FORS 3300. Natural Resources Law and Policy (3); Fa
Natural resources and environmental ethics doctrines and applications with regard to laws and policies are examined. Introduction to laws, regulations, and policies that focus on natural and environmental concerns are the focus of this course. Previous NMHU FOR 330. 

FORS 3400. Quantitative Methods (3); Fa, Sp
Quantitative methods are the techniques used to numerically and statistically analyze observational and experimental data. Students will gain first-hand experience with data analysis of biological, geological, and natural resources data sets. Prerequisite or corequisite: MATH 1220 or instructor permission. Previous NMHU FOR 340. 

FORS 4000. Surface Hydrology (3); Alt, Sp, Even
A course designed for upper-division undergraduate students in earth sciences and natural resources management. The course combines 1) a qualitative conceptual understanding of hydrologic process, 2) an introduction to the quantitative representation of those processes, and 3) an understanding of approaches to hydrological measurements and the uncertainties involved in those measurements. Prerequisite: GEOL 1110, MATH 1220, or instructor permission. Previous NMHU FOR 400. 

FORS 4020. Silviculture (3); Sp
Silviculture is the set of practices to grow and manage trees. The course focuses on the factors affecting tree growth, tree stand dynamics and health, and the impact of management on ecosystem values. The ecological practices to sustainably produce forest products are emphasized. Prerequisite: FORS 3100. Previous NMHU FOR 402. 

FORS 4080. Limnology (4); 3, 1 Alt, Fa, Even
A study of the interrelationships among plants, animals, and environmental factors in aquatic ecosystems. The course is field oriented and concentrates on the development of sampling techniques and the analysis of biotic and abiotic components of nearby lakes and streams. Prerequisite: FORS 2120, CHEM 1215 and MATH 1220, or instructor permission. Previous NMHU FOR 408. 

FORS 4100. Forest Management (3); Fa
This course focuses on the economic and scientific decisions for large tracts of land and multiple types of forest stands over landscapes. The elements of planning management activities to create the least costs and greatest benefits for a landowner are explored. Prerequisites: FORS 3050 and 4020. Previous NMHU FOR 410. 

FORS 4120. Surveying and Geographic Information Systems (4); 3, 2 Fa, Sp
The training and application of surveying and GIS databases to environmental and natural resources problems. Prerequisites: MATH 1220 with a minimum grade of C or instructor permission. Previous NMHU FOR 412. 

FORS 4130. Ecological and Environmental Monitoring (3)
Monitoring is the observation of treatment effects or the condition of natural and human systems over time. Many systems are monitored for pollutants and regulatory compliance, adverse outcomes of environmental management practices, and to determine trends in animal and plant populations. The course explores 1) roles of monitoring in environmental management and ecology; 2) considerations in designing monitoring programs; 3) sampling methodologies for soil conditions, water quality, animal and plant populations, and responses to treatments; and 4) uses of monitoring results. Prerequisites: CHEM 1225, and MATH 1220. Previous NMHU FOR 413. 

FORS 4160. Soil Science (4); 3, 2 Fa
This course provides students with basic soil science concepts. The physical, chemical and ecological properties of soils are applied to soil classification, genesis, fertility, productivity, irrigation and erosion. Prerequisites: BIOL 2110, CHEM 1215 and MATH 1220. Previous NMHU FOR 416. 

FORS 4170. Watershed Management (3)
This course will emphasize the interdisciplinary characteristics of watershed management. The need to incorporate ecological and socioeconomic factors when planning and implementing programs to achieve sustainable, socially viable natural resource development is emphasized. Prerequisites: FORS 2110 and FORS 3300 or instructor permission. Previous NMHU FOR 417.

FORS 4180. Aquatic Ecology (4); 3, 2 Alt, Fa, Odd
This course examines the biological, chemical, and physical features of aquatic environments and relates them to general ecological concepts and environmental concerns. The course focuses on the physiological adaptations of species to the aquatic environment and invertebrate and fish community structure. Additionally, this course will examine both the negative and positive impacts that anthropogenic activities have on the ecology of aquatic systems. Prerequisites: BIOL 2120, CHEM 1215, and MATH 1220. Previous NMHU FOR 418. 

FORS 4200. Wildlife Habitat Management (3); Alt, Sp, Even
This course examines the principles and practice of wildlife management with an emphasis on habitats, distribution, abundance and legal considerations. Prerequisite: FORS 2110. Previous NMHU FOR 420. 

FORS 4240. Wildland Pest Management (3); 3, 2 Sp
A pest is an organism that interferes with human activities. Pests annually cause large losses of food and wood, as well as damage to infrastructure and ecosystem services. This course explores major wildland pest organisms, and practices for management of their populations. Students will learn about management practices for insect, weed, pathogen and vertebrate animal pests, such as integrated pest management, cultural management, pesticide use, and biological control. Prerequisites: CHEM 1215 and FORS 2110. Previous NMHU FOR 424. 

FORS 4260. Professional Ethics (1); Sp
Natural and environmental resources professionals may work for public agencies, wood products corporations, consulting firms, or private contractors. Professional ethics is the set of decision guidelines for dealing with various landowners, the conduct of professional and business activities, and the conservation of resources for future generations. This course explores common ethical issues for natural resources professionals. Prerequisite: FORS 1010. Previous NMHU FOR 426. 

FORS 4330. Water Science (4); 3, 2 Var
This is a course focused on the standard methods of water analysis and interpretation of results for surface and ground waters, water supply systems, and wastewater discharges. The course will focus on coliform bacteria, nutrients, organic matter, heavy metals, pesticides, and water quality standards. Prerequisites: FORS 2120, CHEM 1215, and MATH 1220 or instructor permission. Previous NMHU FOR 433. 

FORS 4510. Project Fires and Post-Fire Rehabilitation (3); Var
This class is designed to investigate the potential problems resulting from fires including erosion on slopes and in stream channels, sediment and debris jams in streams, weed infestations, loss of vegetation and forest cover, hazards from fire-killed trees falling, and potential damage from post-fire activities, like salvage logging. One Saturday field trip is mandatory. Prerequisite: FORS 4050. Previous NMHU FORS 451. 

FORS 4520. Prescribed Fire Practices (4); 3, 2; Var
Prescribed fires are used to meet management objectives of fuel reduction and ecosystem restoration. This course explores the design, planning, conduct, and monitoring in prescribed fire utilization. The course includes two mandatory Saturday field trips and participation in a prescribed fire. Prerequisite: FOR 1010, FOR 3180, or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU FOR 452.

FORS 4530. Toxicology in Life Sciences (3); Var
Students will develop an understanding of the general process of conducting release, contamination, and risk assessments. Furthermore, students will be able to understand and work with federal and state guidelines and regulations that bear on the conduct of environmental public health investigations. The ultimate goal is to equip students with knowledge and skills that are utilized to assess the general impact of substances on human health. Prerequisite: CHEM 1215 or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU FOR 453. 

FORS 4560. Fire and Landscape Ecology (3); Var
This class investigates the landscape-scale effects of wildfires, as well as the ecology of fire in a variety of ecosystems and includes the effects of fire on plants, animals, soils, water and air. The course emphasizes the prediction and characterization of fire effects over time and space as well as the role of fire in restoration ecology. Case studies of restoration projects using fire in prairies, ponderosa pine and white bark forests will be examined. Prerequisites: CHEM 1215, FOR 2110 and FOR 3070. Previous NMHU FOR 456. 

FORS 4610. Atmospheric Science (3); Var
The physical structure and dynamics of the atmosphere are explored. Air pollutant movement, dissipation, and chemistry will be discussed. Weather phenomena and local ventilation patterns will be discussed in terms and of smoke and air pollutant dispersion, fire behavior, and pesticide sprays. Prerequisites: CHEM 1215, and MATH 1220. Previous NMHU FOR 461. 

FORS 4920. Applied Forestry Research (3); Sp
This capstone course is designed for students to participate in an applied forest research project where they are required to incorporate the results of their academic preparation. Each class will pursue research toward a forest management hypothesis or question chosen by the instructor. Each student will investigate a specific issue of a broader question. Students will present their data at NMHU Research Day or a meeting of recognized scientific society. Prerequisite: FORS 4100, Senior classification and permission of instructor. Previous NMHU FOR 492. 

FORS 4990. Independent Research (1-6 VC); Fa, Sp, Su
Study of a special topic in natural resources management in an individual, directed research-based project arranged with an individual instructor. Instructor permission required. Previous NMHU FOR 499.