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Department of Sociology, Anthropology, & Criminal Justice Graduate Requirements

Dr. Gloria Gadsden, Department Chair
Lora Magnum Shields Science Building, Room 245
PHONE: 505-454-3209  FAX: 505-454-3331
E-mail: gygadsden@nmhu.edu

About
The department offers graduate programs in Public Affairs-Applied Sociology and in Southwest Studies-Anthropology. Anthropology also offers a post baccalaureate certificate in Cultural Resource Management (CRM).


Mission of the Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal Justice
Faculty
Resources and Facilities
Master of Arts in Public Affairs (MA)
Master of Arts Southwest Studies (M.A.)
Postbaccalaureate Certificate in Cultural Resource Management (CRM)
Course Description

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Mission of the Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal Justice
The mission of the Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal Justice is to contribute to meeting the educational and research needs in sociology, anthropology, criminal justice and the related fields; contribute to meeting the career needs in social services and social sciences, tribal, state, and federal career requirements, as well as contribute to training for careers in education, law, public service, and other social science fields; contribute to meeting the need for secondary school teacher certification in sociology and/or anthropology; and to provide sociocultural service and expertise for the region, as well as the greater global community.

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Faculty

Rebecca Álvarez, Ph.D. (Sociology)
Erika Derkas, Ph.D. (Sociology)
Victoria Evans, M.A. (Anthropology)
Gloria Gadsden, Ph.D. (Sociology)
Mario Gonzales, Ph.D. (Anthropology)
Kallie Wilbourn, MA (Anthropology)
Orit Tamir, Ph.D. (Anthropology)

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Resources and Facilities

Northern New Mexico provides an outstanding context for social and cultural studies at NMHU. Students engage in field archaeological digs, ethnographic and sociological research, and in practicum experiences. Each student has the opportunity to conduct research in our anthropology lab. Studies of human behavior emphasize field data and computer applications for analysis and interpretation.

Student professional societies and organizations such as the Sociology and Anthropology Club and/or membership in regional or national professional associations provide opportunities for student participation and program enrichment beyond the classroom.

Southwest Studies-Anthropology (MA)

The graduate program in anthropology is a part of an interdisciplinary Master of Arts degree program in Southwest Studies. This includes the disciplines of anthropology and history.

Students complete a common core of courses in Southwestern prehistory, history, and contemporary cultures of the American Southwest. Prior to admission to the program, students select anthropology or history as an area of concentration. Students interested in anthropology will choose one of two emphases: MA in Southwest Studies – Anthropology Concentration (thesis option), MA in Southwest Studies – Anthropology Concentration (professional paper option).

The Master of Arts program’s two emphases prepares students for doctoral programs in anthropology and related fields, teaching, research, and applied positions in cultural resources management, federal, state, and local agencies as well as private business and nonprofit sectors.

New Mexico Highlands University geographic location in a multi-ethnic region of the Southwest provides a unique perspective for archaeological and ethnographic field experiences. The anthropology lab houses a significant collection of prehistoric and historic cultural resources for northeastern New Mexico.

Public Affairs-Applied Sociology (MA)

The graduate program in sociology is part of an interdisciplinary Master of Arts degree program in public affairs. The program provides a comprehensive understanding of the social and cultural environment in the public and private sphere through a common core of courses taken by all students in political theory, social theory and historical thought, human culture, and economic theory. Prior to admission to the program, students select one of the following concentrations: political and governmental processes (see political science in the Department of Humanities), or applied sociology. Students interested in sociology will follow the curriculum described below.

This program prepares students for doctoral studies and may provide enrichment for professionals in public careers such as law, politics, or government service. The program also provides advanced preparation for teachers. The interdisciplinary nature of the program is well suited to such purposes, by combining theoretical knowledge and practical methodology in historical and cross-cultural analysis; archival research; personal and participant observation, interview, and survey techniques; and statistical analysis, model-building, and simulation–applied to analysis of social and cultural trends; political and economic policy at local, regional, national, and international levels; and organizational and institutional processes.

The program’s geographic location in a multi-ethnic region of the Southwest brings unique perspectives. Field and practicum experiences are available to capitalize on the region’s rich social, cultural, and institutional resources.

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Master of Arts in Public Affairs (MA)

Required core:
Choose 12 to 15 credits from the following:

ANTH 6510 Seminar: Concepts of Human Culture (3)
HIST 6150 Contemporary Historical Thought (3)
POLS 5630 Political Economy (3)
POLS 6540 Seminar: The State (3)
SOCI 6380 Advanced Classical Social Theories (3)

OR

SOCI 6390 Contemporary Sociological Theories (3)

Core Total: 12 – 15 credit hours

 

Applied Sociology Concentration
Required courses: 10-16 (Depending on Thesis/Non-Thesis Option)
All Applied Sociology Concentration students must take both SOC 6380 and SOC 6390

SOCI 5300 Applied Social Research and Data Analysis (4)
SOCI 6380 Advanced Classical Social Theories (3)
SOCI 6390 Contemporary Sociological Theories (3)
SOCI 6300 Research Methods in Sociology & Anthropology (3)

Choose one of the following, in consultation with your adviser:

SOCI 6990 Thesis (6)*
*Non-Thesis Option for Study: Completion of Two (2) “Professional Papers” and 6 Additional Sociology Elective Credits.

Concentration Total: 10-16

Electives 6-15 credit hours (Depending on Thesis/Non-Thesis Option)

Select in consultation with graduate academic adviser

Concentration Total: 21-24 Credits

Program Total: 36 credit hours

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Master of Arts in Southwest Studies (M.A.)

Thesis Option
Required core: Choose 12 credits from the following list:

ANTH 5130 Archaeology of Southwest (3)
HIST 6180 Seminar: The Southwest (3)
POLS 6110 Seminar: Southwest Politics (3)
ANTH 5760 Indians of the American Southwest (3)

OR

ANTH 5770 The Hispanic Southwest (3)

General Core Total: 12 credit hours

Concentration in Anthropology
Electives: 12-15 credit hours selected in consultation with graduate adviser. Elective may not be duplicated from core or other required course.   

Required courses: 10 credit hours

ANTH 6520 Seminar: Thesis Writing (1)
ANTH 6960 Ethnographic Research Methods (3)
ANTH 6990 Thesis (6)*

Thesis Option Total: 34-37 credit hours

Non-Thesis Option
Required core: Choose 12 credits from the following list:

ANTH 5130 Archaeology of Southwest (3)
HIST 6180 Seminar: The Southwest (3)
POLS 6110 Seminar: Southwest Politics (3)
ANTH 5760 Indians of the American Southwest (3)

OR

ANTH 5770 The Hispanic Southwest (3)

 

Concentration in Anthropology
Electives: 15 credit hours selected in consultation with graduate adviser.  Elective may not be duplicated from core or other required courses.

Required courses: 8 credit hours

ANTH 6960 Ethnographic Research Methods (3)
ANTH 5140 Field Methods in Archaeology (2-4)
ANTH 6940 Professional Paper (3)

Non-Thesis Option Total: 35-37 credit hours

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Postbaccalaureate Certificate in Cultural Resource Management (CRM) 

Required courses: 20-24 credit hours

ANTH 5100 Method and Theory in Archaeology (3)
ANTH 5130 Archaeology of the Southwest (3)
ANTH 5140 Field Methods in Archaeology (Field School) (2-6)
ANTH 5760 Indians of the American Southwest (3)

OR

ANTH 5770 The Hispanic Southwest (3)
ANTH 5810 Cultural Resources Management (3)
ANTH 6960 Ethnographic Research Methods (3)

Choose, in consultation with your adviser, three of the following courses: 9 credits

ANTH 5110 People and Plants in Prehistory (3)
ANTH 5120 Lithic Tech & Analysis (3)
ANTH 5420 Forensic Anthropology and Osteology (4)
GEOL 5120 Surveying & Geographic Information Systems (3)

Program Total: 26 – 30 credit hours minimum

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Anthropology, Courses in (ANTH)

ANTH 5100. Method and Theory in Archaeology (3); Var
The purpose, techniques, methods and theory of archaeology in the study of the human past and in the context of modern science. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Previous NMHU ANTH 510.

ANTH 5110. People and Plants in Prehistory (3); Var
The question of subsistence is central to every archaeological inquiry. The specialized field of paleoethnobotany allows us to infer dietary habits from charred plant remains recovered during archaeological excavations. The purpose of this course, therefore, is to familiarize students with field methods employed in the recovery of botanical remains (samplings, flotation, capture, and drying) and lab methods used to identify and interpret them. Special emphasis will be placed on identifying wild and domestic plants used by prehistoric peoples of northeastern New Mexico. Previous NMHU ANTH 511.

ANTH 5120. Lithic Technology and Analysis (3); Var
The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the study of stone tools in archaeological contexts. We wish to learn from which materials these tools were made, the techniques that were employed to make them, and how they came to be discarded to become part of the archaeological record. We also wish to know from where the materials came and what properties caused them to be selected for the purpose of purposes for which they were chosen. Accordingly, the course is broken into four general areas: geology, technology, analysis, and interpretation. Previous NMHU ANTH 512.

ANTH 5130. Archaeology of the Southwest (3); 2, 2 Var
Study of prehistoric cultures (before 1500) of the American Southwest. Prerequisite: One course in introductory sociology or anthropology. Previous NMHU ANTH 513.

ANTH 5140. Field Methods in Archaeology (2 – 6 VC); Su
Instruction in Archaeology field and laboratory techniques and methods. Prerequisite: ANTH 5100 or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU ANTH 514.

ANTH 5150. Development and Socio-Cultural Change (3); Var
This course concerns the nature and consequences of development and culture change. The focus is on contemporary issues and many ways in which anthropology is used outside its purely academic context: how anthropology is applied to contemporary human issues, how it benefits society, and how it advances theoretical knowledge. Prerequisite: One course in introductory Sociology or Anthropology. Cross-listed as SOC 5150. Previous NMHU ANTH 515.

ANTH 5160. Ceramic Analysis (3); Var
The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with pottery-making in prehistoric contexts, the geology and petrography involved, stylistic and iconographic themes, and how to analyze a prehistoric ceramic assemblage. Accordingly, the course is divided into several general areas: geology and the mineralogical and chemical makeup of clays; history of ceramic manufacture and trade; technological production of pottery including clay sources, vessel properties, shape, form, function and design; and the uses of style in questions of social ties and affiliations. Prerequisites: ANTH 1140 and ANGH 1215.

ANTH 5180. Beliefs and Practices Among Southwest Native Americans (3); Var
This course provides an overview of Southwest Native Americans beliefs and practice. It will focus on the sacred ecology, mythology, world view, ritual and dance complex of a number of diverse tribes within the American Southwest. Southwest Native American and practices will be placed within the larger historical and contemporary social, political, and cultural contexts. Previous NMHU ANTH 518.

 ANTH 5200. Anthropology Goes to the Movies (3); Var
The course will feature ethnographic films that explore cross-cultural themes about identities (race-ethnicity, nationality, political organization, religion, gender, class, sexuality, and so on) primarily through film and secondarily through ethnographic texts. Course readings, films, class lectures and discussions will examine the themes of cinematic (visual and auditory) manipulation of audience perceptions and interpretations, research and ethics and accountabilities, and the politics of ethnographic representation. You will learn about film in anthropology by viewing and discussing films that reflect various anthropological principles. Thinking about anthropology films will require talking and writing about the subject. Previous NMHU ANTH 520.

ANTH 5220. Magic, Witchcraft and Healing (3); Var
The origins, elements, forms, and symbolism of religion including a comparative survey of religious beliefs, myths, practices, and symbolism. Course focuses on religion in the context of culture with an emphasis on appreciating religious differences. Prerequisite: One course in introductory sociology or anthropology. Cross-listed as SOC 5220. Previous NMHU ANTH 522.

ANTH 5280. Global Crime (3); Fa
This course is a sociological and anthropological analysis of social control and law in a variety of social cultural, and globalcontexts. Previous NMHU ANTH 528.

ANTH 5290. Gender, Culture, and Society (3); Var
This course provides a foundation for understanding gender as expressed within and influenced by society. Cross culturally men and women are perceived as different, often as opposites. This perception can affect the quality of life, both on a structural level (in terms of wages earned, jobs held) and on an interpersonal level (in terms of expression of self/autonomy). Various theoretical perspectives are explored in order to understand why this perception of difference exists, how it translates into inequality and how it is learned. Previous NMHU ANTH 529.

ANTH 5350. Selected Topics in Anthropology (1 – 4 VC); Var
Course in a topic or topics in anthropology: may be repeated with a change of content. Previous NMHU ANTH 535.

ANTH 5420. Forensic Anthropology and Osteology (4); 3, 2 Var
Presentation and application of biological anthropology techniques in the identification of humans from skeletal remains. Previous NMHU ANTH 542.

ANTH 5540. Women and Globalization (3); Var
This course examines how women’s lives are shaped by globalization through the feminization of labor and migration, environmental degradation, Diaspora, sexuality, cultural displacement, and militarization. It explores the ways women have confronted these conditions as well as the possibilities and challenges of cross-border feminist coalitions. Previous NMHU ANTH 554.

ANTH 5560. U.S.-Mexico Immigration: Border Issues (3); Var
Socially and culturally, economically and demographically no international process has affected everyday life in the United States more than Mexican immigration. The course will examine the evolution, expansion and maintenance of processes and structures that have come to institutionalize the unspoken immigration “agreements” between these two nations. Previous NMHU ANTH 556.

ANTH 5610. Communication and Culture (3); Fa
Anthropological linguistics, focusing on investigations of the relationships between language and culture. Previous NMHU ANTH 561.

ANTH 5740. Contemporary Indian Issues (3); Var
An examination of emerging social and cultural issues in American Indian society today. Previous NMHU ANTH 574.

ANTH 5760. Indians of the American Southwest (3); Var
A survey of the Native American cultures in the Southwest since 1500, including both Pueblo and non-Pueblo cultures. Prerequisite: One course in introductory sociology or anthropology. Previous NMHU ANTH 576.

ANTH 5770. The Hispanic Southwest (3); Var
The ethno-historical and socio-anthropological examination of Spanish-speaking people in the Southwest from their establishment to contemporary times. Previous NMHU ANTH 577.

ANTH 5800. Issues in Applied Anthropology (3); Var
Course will focus on what applied anthropology is, how it is done, how it benefits society, and how it advances Anthropology’s theoretical knowledge of culture and society. It is also a course for students who are interested in learning about the various ways in which anthropology is used outside the classroom. Previous NMHU ANTH 580.

ANTH 5810. Cultural Resource Management (3); Var
This course will provide the students with the foundations for conducting cultural resource management (CRM). It addresses laws, regulations, agencies, and techniques needed for conducting CRM work and practical experience. Prerequisite: One culture area course. Previous NMHU ANTH 581.

ANTH 6500. Seminar in Anthropology (1 – 4 VC); Var
Seminar course in a topic or topics in anthropology: may be repeated with change in content. Previous NMHU ANTH 650.

ANTH 6510. Seminar: Concepts of Human Culture (3); Var
This course will help acquaint students with the world of human cultures and to arrive at a means of understanding “culture” as well as theoretical constructs developed to examine the central concepts of anthropology. The place of anthropology in the western tradition; issues examined by anthropologists from an array of theoretical perspectives; examples from ethnographic studies; application to public issues and policies, are means through which theory will be brought to bear on praxis. Previous NMHU ANTH 651.

ANTH 6520. Seminar: Thesis Writing (1); Var
Instruct and facilitate students in empirical, historical, and theoretical research and in design, preparation, and completion of a thesis in anthropology. Previous NMHU ANTH 652.

ANTH 6900. Independent Study (1 – 4 VC); Var
Individual, directed study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU ANTH 690.

 ANTH 6920. Independent Research (1 – 4 VC); Var
Independent research arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU ANTH 692.

ANTH 6940. Professional Paper (1 – 3 VC); Var
The professional Paper provides a unique opportunity for each student to bring together all of the course-work for the MA in Southwest studies – Anthropology Concentration into a practical application of socio-cultural phenomenon. Previous NMHU ANTH 694.

ANTH 6960. Ethnographic Research Methods (3); Var
The course addresses methods of data collection, coding, and analysis for ethnographic field work in Anthropology. Techniques include naturalistic and participant observation, structured and unstructured interviewing, field note taking and management, and other related qualitative data gathering approaches, some of which may be used in the development of quantitative instruments and analysis. Of continuing concern is the interplay between theoretical perspectives and the influence of selected data collection methodologies. Previous NMHU ANTH 696.

ANTH 6990. Thesis (1 – 6 VC); Var
Individual research and writing in preparation of a graduate thesis. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU ANTH 699.

 

Sociology (SOCI), Courses in

SOCI 5100. Sociology of Sexuality (3); Var
This course will look at historical perceptions, practices and reactions to sexuality.  As the course progresses, it will focus more closely on particular social contexts and notions of power. Prerequisites: SOCI 1110.

SOCI 5140. Race, Ethnicity, and Policing (3); Var

A thorough overview of the various ways in which racial stratification in the U.S. impacts current policing methods. A critical approach to racial profiling, excessive force, surveillance technology, community cooperation, and community policing, with an exploration of constructive ways in which best practices can be identified and applied. Prerequisites: SOCI 1110.

 SOCI 5120. Social Stratification (3); Sp

Differentiation, status, social mobility, class, and caste in selected societies. Previous NMHU SOC 512.

 SOCI 5150. Development and Socio-Cultural Change (3); Var

This course concerns the nature and consequences of development and culture change. The focus is on contemporary issues and many ways in which anthropology is used outside its purely academic context: how anthropology is applied to contemporary human issues, how it benefits society, and how it advances theoretical knowledge. Cross-listed as: ANTH 5150. Prerequisite: One course in introductory sociology or anthropology. Previous NMHU SOC 515.

 SOCI 5220. Magic, Witchcraft, and Healing (3); Var

The origins, elements, forms, and symbolism of religion including a comparative survey of religious beliefs, myths, practices and symbolism. Course focuses on religion in the context of culture with an emphasis on appreciating religious differences. Cross-listed as: ANTH 5220. Prerequisite: One course in introductory sociology or anthropology. Previous NMHU SOC 522.

 SOCI 5270. Criminology (3); Sp

An overview of definitions and types of crime, and social theories of crime causation; special issues related to crime, crime control and crime prevention. Previous NMHU SOC 527.

 SOCI 5280. Global Crime (3); Var

This course is a sociological and anthropological analysis of social control and law in a variety of social, cultural, and global contexts. Previous NMHU SOC 528.

 SOCI 5290. Gender, Culture, and Society (3); Var

This course provides a foundation for understanding gender as expressed within and influenced by society. Cross culturally men and women are perceived as different, often as opposites. This perception can affect the quality of life, both on a structural level (in terms of wages earned, jobs held) and on an interpersonal level (in terms of expression of self/autonomy). Various theoretical perspectives are explored in order to understand why this perception of difference exists, how it translates into inequality and how it is learned. Previous NMHU SOC 529.

 SOCI 5300. Applied Social Research and Data Analysis (4); 3, 2 Sp

Instruction in application of techniques used in the analysis of quantitative and qualitative social science research data. Previous NMHU SOC 530.

 SOCI 5310. Political Sociology (3); Var

Sociological theory and research as applied to the study of political behavior, including such topics as the social bases of power (class, occupation, religion, cultural values), decision-making, leadership and communications. Previous NMHU SOC 531.

 SOCI 5350 – 6350. Selected Topics in Sociology (1 – 4 VC); Var

Course in topic or topics in sociology; may be repeated with a change of content. Previous NMHU SOC 535-635.

 SOCI 5390. Introduction to Contemporary Sociological Theories (3); Sp

Introduction to and analysis of contemporary sociological theories. Previous NMHU SOC 539.

 SOCI 5500 – 6500. Seminar in Sociology (1 – 4 VC); Var

Seminar course in a topic or topics in sociology; may be repeated with change in content. Previous NMHU SOC 550 – 650.

 SOCI 5540. Women and Globalization (3); Var

This course examines how women’s lives are shaped by globalization through the feminization of labor and migration, environmental degradation, Diaspora, sexuality, cultural displacement, and militarization. It explores the ways women have confronted these conditions as well as the possibilities and challenges of cross-border feminist coalitions. Previous NMHU SOC 554.

 SOCI 5600. Approaches to Dispute Resolution (3); Var
This course provides a theoretical and practical understanding of dispute resolution processes in use in the private and public sectors. The course examines how and why dispute resolution processes function in particular environments, and critiques the strengths and weaknesses of each process. Prerequisite: Introductory course in psychology or introductory course in sociology. Previous NMHU SOC 560.

 SOCI 5900–6900. Independent Study (1 – 4 VC); Var
Independent, directed study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU SOC 590-690.

 SOCI 5930. Race and Ethnic Relations (3); Sp
The basic processes operating in the present day interrelations of ethnic groups. Previous NMHU SOC 593.

 SOCI 6300. Research Methods in Sociology and Anthropology (3); Var
Research techniques in the study of social and cultural aspects of human existence, critical study, and application of methods. Previous NMHU SOC 630.

 SOCI 6380. Advanced Classical Sociological Theories (3); Fa
This course will explore the origins and development of sociological theory through the examination of original source materials. The course is an advanced exploration of classical sociological theory designed specifically for graduate students. The student will gain an understanding of the important theoretical constructs that have shaped sociology and our understanding of society. In addition, the student will emerge with the ability to apply these theoretical constructs to both past and current social phenomena and problems. Previous NMHU SOC 638.

 SOCI 6390. Contemporary Sociological Theories (3); Sp
Detailed study of recent social theories with critical analysis and comparison. Previous NMHU SOC 639.

 SOCI 6920. Independent Research (1 – 4 VC); Var
Independent research arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU SOC 692.

 SOCI 6980. Field Experience (1 – 6 VC); Var
A field placement in a local institution or agency providing opportunity for observation and limited exposure to the use of professional techniques under staff supervision. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU SOC 698.

 SOCI 6990. Thesis (1 – 6 VC); Var
Individual research and writing in preparation of a graduate thesis. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU SOC 699.

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 This program is under the College of Arts and Sciences