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Graduate Catalog

Graduate Catalog 2020-2021

Administration

The Board of Regents

Michelle Lujan Grisham, Governor of New Mexico, Ex Officio, Santa Fe
Leveo V. Sanchez, Santa Fe
Frank Marchi, Albuquerque
Danelle J. Smith, Member, Las Vegas
William E. “Bill” Garcia, Member, Santa Fe
Christopher Ulibarri, Student Regent

President
Sam Minner, Ph.D.

Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs
Roxanne M. Gonzales, Ed.D.

Vice Presidents
Max Baca, M.B.A., Finance and Administration
Theresa Law, J.D., Advancement & Strategic Enrollment Management 

Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs, Grants and Contracts
Ian Williamson, Ph.D.

Academic Deans
Cristina Durán, Ph.D., M.S.W., Facundo Valdez School of Social Work
Brandon Kempner, Ph.D., College of Arts & Sciences and Graduate Studies, Interim
Mary Earick, Ph.D., School of Education
Veena Parboteeah, Ph.D., School of Business, Media and Technology
Ian Williamson, Ph.D. Interim Dean of Graduate Studies

Student Affairs
Kimberly J. Blea, Ph.D., Dean of Students

University Registrar
Henrietta Romero, M.A.

Director of Online and Extended Learning
Patrick Wilson, Ph.D.

Center Directors/Managers
Robert A. Anaya, M.A., Santa Fe
Joseph Moreno, M.A., Albuquerque/Rio Rancho
Gilbert “Buddy” Rivera, M.S. Farmington

New Mexico Highlands University
Box 9000, Las Vegas, New Mexico 87701
505-425-7511

www.nmhu.edu

New Mexico Highlands University is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission, 230 South LaSalle Street, Suite 7-500, Chicago, Illinois 60604-1411, Phone: 800-621-7440 / 312-263-0456 | Fax: 312-263-7462 | info@hlcommission.org. New Mexico Highlands University is fully accredited and in good standing with the HLC; please see the accreditation section in this document for more information. To review or receive a copy of the Highlands University’s HLC Affiliation Status Report, please see the NMHU website or contact the Provost’s office.

New Mexico Highlands University reserves the right to change its instructional programs at any time. The provisions of this catalog are not to be regarded as an irrevocable contract between the student and New Mexico Highlands University. Course descriptions in this catalog are correct at the time of publication. See the Summary Class Schedule on Self Service Banner (https://idp.quicklaunchsso.com/nmhu) for updates to courses.

New Mexico Highlands University does not discriminate on the basis of disability, race, color, religion, national origin, age, sex, or sexual orientation in employment, admission, programs or services. Any student who feels he or she has been discriminated against is encouraged to file an incident report form with the Office of the Dean of Student Affairs. For more information, please refer to the New Mexico Highlands University Student Handbook or the NMHU website at www.nmhu.edu/handbook.

All New Mexico Highlands University educational programs and activities will be made accessible to students with disabilities upon request in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). If you believe that you have a physical, learning, or psychological disability that requires an academic accommodation, contact the Coordinator of Accessibility Services by phone at (505) 454-3188 or 454-3252, via email at disabilities@nmhu.edu, or visit the Felix Martinez Building, Suite 130, Room 134 on the Las Vegas campus. If you need this catalog upon in an alternative format, you may also contact the Coordinator of Accessibility Service at disabilities@nmhu.edu.

Retention and graduation rate information can be obtained from the Office of Institutional Effectiveness and Research at http://www.nmhu.edu/institutional-research/enrollment-and-retention/

 

Graduate Catalog
Fall 2020—Summer 2021
Published by New Mexico Highlands University,
Box 9000, Las Vegas, New Mexico 87701

© 2020 New Mexico Highlands University. All rights reserved.

Catalog Changes
Graduate students may graduate under the catalog requirements for the year in which they were enrolled for the first time in a degree-seeking program, providing they complete the graduation requirements within a five-year period. Students are responsible for knowing the rules and regulations concerning graduation requirements and for registering in the courses necessary to meet them.

However, this catalog is neither a contract nor an offer to contract between New Mexico Highlands University and any person or party. New Mexico Highlands University reserves the right to make additions, deletions and modifications to curricula, course descriptions, degree requirements, academic policies, schedules, academic calendars, financial aid policies, and tuition/fees without notice. All changes take precedence over catalog statements.

While reasonable effort will be made to publicize changes, students are advised to seek current information from appropriate offices. It is the student’s responsibility to know and observe all applicable regulations and procedures. No regulation will be waived or exception granted because students plead ignorance of, or contend they were not informed of, the regulations or procedures. Questions on regulations and their interpretation should be addressed to the office or college/school in which the student’s major department is located.

New Mexico Highlands University reserves the right to effect changes without notice or obligation including the right to discontinue or modify a course or group of courses or a degree program. Although New Mexico Highlands University attempts to accommodate the course requests of students, course offerings may be limited by financial, space, and staffing considerations, or might be otherwise unavailable. Likewise, there may be changes to a student’s original course of study. Every effort is made by New Mexico Highlands University to inform students of changes to their matriculated degree and to provide appropriate courses to fulfill degree requirements. Students should regularly consult with their department adviser to register for courses necessary to meet graduation requirements.

New Mexico Highlands University

New Mexico Highlands University was first established as New Mexico Normal School in 1893, primarily offering teacher education. Today, New Mexico Highlands University is a nationally-recognized Hispanic Serving Institution and a regional comprehensive university offering a wide array of graduate and undergraduate programs in arts and sciences, business, education, media arts, technology, and social work. Through distance education, online courses, and on-site instruction, New Mexico Highlands University has extended some degree-completion undergraduate and graduate programs to centers located in Albuquerque, Farmington, Rio Rancho, and Santa Fe.

New Mexico Highlands University serves a diverse population of students with an enrollment of approximately 3,000 students who attend the main campus in Las Vegas and throughout the centers across New Mexico. Highlands’ programs focus on its multiethnic student body, especially the Hispanic and Native American cultures of New Mexico. The University is committed to excellence in the transmission, discovery, preservation, and application of knowledge itself to maintain a progressive, forward-looking posture responsive to the changing social environment, as to shape the direction the institution will take with respect to anticipated demands and approaching opportunities.

As part of its mission to provide opportunities to the individual student through personal attention, Highlands maintains open enrollment, small classes, and low tuition. It is known nationwide for its research activities, student and faculty achievement, and opportunities for students to combine study with real-world experience. New Mexico Highlands University students’ and faculty consistently receive national and international recognition for many of their achievements and have opportunities to network with other researchers and professionals in their areas of interest.

The Graduate Catalog 2020-2021 is a description of New Mexico Highlands University’s academic programs and courses of instruction. Although much effort has been made to ensure accuracy, error or omissions may be present. All official corrections to this catalog are on file with the Office of the Registrar.

The administration and faculty of New Mexico Highlands University believe that the educational programs of the university are effective and valuable. However, the ultimate results of the programs offered, in terms of such matters as achievement, employment, and professional licensing, are also dependent on factors beyond the control of the university, such as individual student initiative, governmental or institutional regulations, and market conditions. Therefore, New Mexico Highlands University makes no representation or guarantee that following a particular course or curriculum will result in specific achievement, employment admission to other programs, or professional licensing.

Mission
New Mexico Highlands University is a public comprehensive university serving our local and global communities. Our mission is to provide opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students to attain an exceptional education by fostering creativity, critical thinking and research in the liberal arts, sciences, and professions within a diverse community.

Vision Statement
Our vision is to be a premier university transforming lives and communities now and for generations to come.

Core Values

Excellence
We strive to excel in all that we do. Excellence shapes our choices and actions in education, research, creative activities, and service.

Diversity
As a Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI), and an aspiring Native American-Serving Non-Tribal Institution (NASNTI), we welcome national, international, and indigenous students, and consider diversity as our strength. We acknowledge and embrace the cultural values, experiences and multiple identities within our community through inclusion and fairness.

Accessibility
We commit to provide opportunity and affordability to all students and professional advancement for all staff and faculty.

Responsiveness
We collaboratively and efficiently address internal and external issues in a timely and respectful manner.

Expectations of Our Graduates:

  1. Mastery of content knowledge and skills
  2. Effective communication skills
  3. Critical and reflective thinking skills
  4. Effective use of technology

Strategic Goals 2020

  1. New Mexico Highlands University will achieve academic excellence, academic integration, and student success. We commit to establishing and strengthening systems, structures, and programs to enhance students’ holistic well-being and success at all levels of study (including life-long learning), through the delivery of High-Impact Practices such as, research and creative opportunities, increased student engagement, and service learning.
  2. New Mexico Highlands University will achieve strategic enrollment management.

We commit to establishing and implementing a strategic enrollment management plan that includes target enrollments, recruitment, and retention strategies for all academic degree programs and all locations.

  1. New Mexico Highlands University will achieve a vibrant campus life.

We commit to enhancing campus life for students, staff, faculty, alumni and community through expanded intellectual and recreational programs and services at the main campus and Centers, with a commitment to safety and inclusion.

  1. New Mexico Highlands University will be a community partner.

We commit to developing, expanding, and enhancing collaborative community partnerships for mutual benefit in the areas of leadership, community and economic development, community service, academic enrichment, entertainment, and recreation.

  1. New Mexico Highlands University will achieve technological advancement and innovation.

We commit to using technology strategically to support quality, efficiency, and innovation in daily operations, student support services, and teaching and learning.

  1. New Mexico Highlands University will achieve enhanced communication and efficiency.

We commit to engaging in proactive communication at all levels to provide efficient and effective services.

More information online at www.nmhu.edu/highlands2020/

Accreditation
New Mexico Highlands University is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission (HLC), an independent corporation that was founded in 1895 as one of six regional institutional accreditors in the United States. HLC accredits degree-granting post-secondary educational institutions in the North Central region, encompassing 19 states. Accreditation is the recognition that an institution maintains standards requisite for its graduates to gain admission to other reputable institutions of higher learning or to achieve credentials for professional practice. The goal of accreditation is to ensure that education provided by institutions of higher education meets acceptable levels of quality. Their mission is serving the common good by assuring and advancing the quality of higher learning.

As of July 7, 2018, the HLC noted that Highlands meets all the HLC’s criteria for accreditation.

Program/Professional Accreditation

College of Arts & Sciences

Chemistry Program

American Chemical Society

Forestry Major, Management and Wildland Fire Concentration

Society of American Foresters

Nursing Program

Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education

Psychology Master’s Program (Clinical/Counseling Track)

Masters in Psychology Accreditation Council

 School of Business, Media and Technology

 Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs

 School of Education

Rehabilitation Counseling

Council for Accreditation of Counseling & Related Educational Programs (CACREP) New Mexico Public Education Department (NMPED)

New Mexico Higher Education Department (NMHED)

National Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP)

 School of Social Work

Council on Social Work Education (CSWE)

About the Higher Learning Commission
The Higher Learning Commission accredits approximately 1,000 colleges and universities that have a home base in one of 19 states that stretch from West Virginia to Arizona. HLC is a private, nonprofit regional accrediting agency. Faculty, staff, students, parents, and others from the general public with questions regarding HLC’s work should contact the Higher Learning Commission by email at info@hlcommission.org or by phone at 312-263-0456.

For New Mexico Highlands University specific questions, please contact us at hlcinfo@nmhu.edu or visit our accreditation website at www.nmhu.edu/hlc.

Academic Programs and Courses
The graduate academic program at New Mexico Highlands University is administered through the one college and three schools. Students and any others who need assistance or information about academic programs should contact the office of the dean of the appropriate academic unit. In this section of the catalog, the academic program is presented by discipline within each college/school. Program descriptions and instructional requirements are given for each discipline, and courses are listed alphabetically by discipline unit.

Symbols and Abbreviations in Course Listings
Courses are listed by course number followed by course title.

The number in parentheses following the title indicates the number of credits for that course. When a range of credits is offered, the specific number of credits within that range is determined either when the course is scheduled or, for variable-credit courses (identified as “VC”), when each student selects an individually approved number of credits.

When there are numerals following the number of credits, it indicates a number of contact hours per week different from the number of credit hours. The total contact time may exceed the course credit hours. When no numerals follow the number of credits, the course’s contact hours per week match the number of course credit hours (with one hour comprising 50 minutes of meeting time). Any specific prerequisites or co-requisites are stated at the end of the course description. These are enforced by academic program advisers and by the faculty member teaching the course in question. In cases where specific course prerequisites are not stated, assumption of ability to perform at the appropriate level in that discipline is still made.

ACADEMIC MAJORS/MINORS/CONCENTRATIONS/CERTIFICATES

Graduate Program Offerings

MA= Master of Arts, MS= Master of Science, MBA= Master of Business Administration, MSSD=Master in Software System Design, and MSW= Master of Social Work.

For a complete listing of academic programs by campus location, visit https://www.nmhu.edu/visit-new-mexico-highlands-university/

College of Arts & Sciences
https://www.nmhu.edu/landing-college-of-arts-and-sciences/

Department of Biology (MS)

Natural Sciences

Concentration:

Biology (thesis and non-thesis option)

Department of Chemistry (MS)

Applied Chemistry

Department of Computer & Mathematical Sciences

Master of Arts or Science in Media Arts and Computer Science (MA or MS)

Media Arts and Computer Science (MA/MS)

Concentration:

Computer Science

Department of English (MA)

Concentrations:

Creative Writing

Linguistics, Literacy and Composition

Literature

Department of Exercise and Sports Sciences (MA)

Human Performance and Sport

Optional Concentrations:

Teacher Education

Sports Administration

Department of Forestry (MS)

Natural Sciences

Concentrations:

Environmental Science and Management

Department of History and Political Science (MA)

Public Affairs

Concentrations:

Applied Sociology

History

Political and Governmental Processes

Southwest Studies (MA)

Concentrations:

History/Political Science

Department of Natural Resources Management (MS)

Natural Sciences

Concentrations:

Environmental Science and Management

Geology

Certificate in:

Geographical Information Systems (GIS)

Department of Psychology (MS)

Psychology

Concentrations:

General Psychology

Clinical/Psychology

Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminal Justice

Public Affairs (MA)

Concentrations:

Applied Sociology

Southwest Studies (MA)

Concentrations:

Anthropology

Certificate in:

Cultural Resource Management

 Department of Visual and Performing Arts

Emphasis Areas only:

Music*

Art Education*

*(The above emphasis areas can only be combined with the MA in Curriculum & Instruction)

 Post Baccalaureate Certificate in Fine Arts

School of Business, Media and Technology
https://www.nmhu.edu/catalog/catalog-graduate/catalog-graduate-mba/

Master in Business Administration (MBA)

Concentrations:

Accounting

Entrepreneurship

Finance

International Business

Human Resources Management

Management

Marketing

Certificates:

Accounting

Finance

Human Resources Management

Marketing

Media Arts and Computer Science (MFA)

Concentrations:

Cultural Technology

Software Systems Design (MSSD)

Software Systems Design

School of Education
https://www.nmhu.edu/landing-school-of-education/

Department of Counseling & Guidance (MA)

Counseling

Concentrations:

Clinical Mental Health

Clinical Rehabilitation

School

Rehabilitation

Rehabilitation Counseling with Specialization in Vocational Evaluation

Certificates:

Professional Counseling (Licensed Mental Health Counseling)

Rehabilitation Counseling, (CRC, PED K-12)

School Counseling (PED K-12)

Department of Educational Leadership (MA)

Educational Leadership

Certificate:

Educational Leadership

Department of Special Education (MA)

Special Education

Certificates:

Special Education

Department of Teacher Education

Certificates:

Advanced Placement

Alternative Licensure

Bilingual Education

Reading

Secondary Education

Teaching English as a Second Language (TESOL)

Department of Curriculum and Instruction (MA)

Emphasis areas:

Bilingual Education

Reading

English as a Second Language

Teaching English as a Second Language (TESOL)

Or a specific content area (e.g. math, English, history, science, etc.)

Facundo Valdez School of Social Work (MSW)
https://www.nmhu.edu/landing-facundo-valdez-school-of-social-work/

Master of Social Work

Concentrations:

Clinical Practice

Bilingual/Bicultural Clinical Practice (Albuquerque campus only)

Leadership and Administration (Albuquerque campus only)

Dual Degree, MSW/MBA (Albuquerque campus only)

Substance Abuse Focus (Albuquerque campus only)

Campus Links

Academic Affairs
www.nmhu.edu/vice-president-of-academic-affairs/

Academic Calendar
https://www.nmhu.edu/academic-calendar/

Academic Support/Advisement/Testing
www.nmhu.edu/office-of-academic-support/

Accreditation
www.nmhu.edu/hlc

Admission of Students – Undergraduate
www.newmexicohighlands.com/apply

Admission of Transfer Students – Undergraduate
www.nmhu.edu/admissions/undergraduate-transfer-admissions/

Admission of Students – Graduate
www.nmhu.edu/admissions/graduate-admissions/

Albuquerque Center
https://www.nmhu.edu/landing-highlands-albuquerque-center/

ARMAS – Achieving in Research Math and Science STEM Student
Support Center
www.nmhu.edu/student-support-services-armas-in-education/

Athletics
nmhucowboys.com/

Board of Regents
www.nmhu.edu/board-of-regents/

Business Office/Cashier/Student Accounts
www.nmhu.edu/campus-services/business-office/

Campus Police
www.nmhu.edu/campus-police/

Career Services Center
www.nmhu.edu/career-services-center/

College of Arts and Sciences
https://www.nmhu.edu/landing-college-of-arts-and-sciences/

Commencement
www.nmhu.edu/commencement/

Dean of Students
www.nmhu.edu/office-of-the-dean-of-students/

Degree Audit – student degree plans
https://banweb.nmhu.edu/prod/DW_Adviser.P_SignOn

Desire2Learn/E-courses
https://www.nmhu.edu/e-courses-brightspace/

Financial Assistance
www.nmhu.edu/financial-aid/

Faculty-Staff Directory
www.nmhu.edu/faculty-staff-directory/

Facundo Valdez School of Social Work
https://www.nmhu.edu/landing-masters-of-social-work/

Farmington Center
www.nmhu.edu/statewide-centers/highlands-farmington-center/

HU Cares/Student Advocacy and Support
www.nmhu.edu/campus-life/hu-cares/

Highlands Homepage
www.nmhu.edu

HiSET Exam
http://hiset.ets.org/

Human Resources
www.nmhu.edu/human-resources/

Institutional Effectiveness and Research
www.nmhu.edu/institutional-research/

International Students
www.nmhu.edu/international-students/

Intramurals
www.nmhu.edu/the-office-of-campus-life/intramurals

Language Learning Center
www.nmhu.edu/Language-learning

Library
www.nmhu.edu/library/about-the-library

Native American Student Services
www.nmhu.edu/native-american-student-services

NetTutor 24/7 free online tutoring services
www.nmhu.edu/student-support-services/

NMHU Alumni
nmhufoundation.org/nmhu-alumni

NMHU Foundation/Donations and Community Engagement
nmhufoundation.org

Office of the Dean of Students
www.nmhu.edu/office-of-the-dean-of-students/

Outdoor Recreation Center
www.nmhu.edu/outdoor-recreation-center/

Post Office
https://www.nmhu.edu/campus-life-2/campus-post-office/

President’s Office
www.nmhu.edu/presidents-office/

Purple Pub Computer Lab
https://www.nmhu.edu/purple-pub-computer-lab

Registration
www.nmhu.edu/office-of-the-registrar/registration/

Rio Rancho Center
https://www.nmhu.edu/landing-rio-rancho-center/

Santa Fe Center
https://www.nmhu.edu/landing-santafe-center/

Scholarships
www.nmhu.edu/financial-aid/scholarships/

School of Business, Media and Technology
https://www.nmhu.edu/landing-school-of-business-media-and-technology/

School of Education
https://www.nmhu.edu/landing-school-of-education/

Self-Service Banner – MyNMHU
https://idp.quicklaunchsso.com/nmhu

Strategic Enrollment Management
www.nmhu.edu/strategic-enrollment-management/

Student Employment
www.nmhu.edu/career-services/jobs/

Student Government
www.nmhu.edu/associated-students-of-new-mexico-highlands-university/

Student Handbook
www.nmhu.edu/student-handbook/

Student Housing
www.nmhu.edu/highlands-university-housing/

Summary Class Schedule
https://banweb.nmhu.edu/prod/wwckschd.p_disp_dyn_sched

Technical Help for Self-service Banner
www.nmhu.edu/information-technology-services/technical-help-for-
students/

Transcripts
www.nmhu.edu/office-of-the-registrar/transcripts/

Tuition and Fees
www.nmhu.edu/office-of-the-registrar/tuition-and-fees/

TTY Switchboard : 505-454-3003

Women’s Center
www.nmhu.edu/campus-life/womens-center/

Writing Center
www.nmhu.edu/writing-center/

About this Catalog
The Graduate Catalog 2020-2021 is a description of New Mexico Highlands University’s policies, graduate academic programs, and courses of instruction. Although much effort has been made to ensure accuracy, errors or omissions may be present. All official corrections to this catalog are on file with the Office of the Registrar. The General Information and Policy section of this catalog are continuously updated on Highlands’ website, www.nmhu.edu. Course descriptions in this catalog are correct at the time of publication. See the Summary Class Schedule on Self Service Banner (MyNMHU) for updates to courses. The administration and faculty of New Mexico Highlands University believe the educational programs of the University are of high quality and Highlands’s graduates have excelled in a variety of careers. However, the ultimate results of the programs offered – in terms of achievement, future employment, and professional licensure – are also dependent on factors beyond the control of the University, such as individual student initiative and responsibility, governmental or institutional regulations, and market conditions. Therefore, New Mexico Highlands University makes no representation or guarantee that following a particular course or curriculum will result in specific achievement, employment, admission to other programs, or professional licensure.

New Mexico Highlands University reserves the right to change its instructional programs at any time. The provisions of this catalog are not to be regarded as an irrevocable contract between the student and New Mexico Highlands University. Course descriptions in this catalog are correct at the time of publication. See the Summary Class Schedule for updates to courses.

Code of Conduct
The New Mexico Highlands University Student Handbook, that is published each year, describes student services, the Code of Student Conduct, and related policies and procedures. Administered by the Dean of Student Affairs, the code sets the standards and expected behavior of students. Procedures for hearings, appeals, grievances, and complaints of discrimination/harassment are outlined in the Handbook. The Handbook is provided to new students; it may be downloaded at www.nmhu.edu, or a copy may be obtained from the Office of Dean of Students, Box 9000, Las Vegas, NM 87701.

New Mexico Highlands University prohibits the use, distribution, manufacture, or possession of controlled substances on university property or as any part of any university activity.

Students with Disabilities/Academic Accommodations
Students with a documented disability are eligible to receive appropriate and reasonable academic accommodations or auxiliary aids in accordance with the legal requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Acts (ADA), the ADA Amendments Act of 2008, the Vocational Rehabilitation Act of 1974 (as amended), and other laws governing the disabled. Accessibility Services also adheres to the professional code of conduct promulgated by the Association of Higher Education and Disability (AHEAD). Students wishing to receive academic accommodations may provide complete documentation to Accessibility Services as early as possible prior to each semester. It is the responsibility of the student to disclose a disability, to provide appropriate documentation from a qualified professional identifying the disability and recommend accommodation, and to request accommodations. To receive academic accommodations during attendance at New Mexico Highlands University, each student may supply appropriate clinical documentation of his or her disability. Each student must also submit a completed New Mexico Highlands University Accessibility Services Application packet and a copy of his or her class schedule. Copies of these forms are available from Accessibility Services. Students approved for accommodations are expected to meet the same standards of academic performance as students without disabilities.

Accessibility Services is located in Suite 130, Room 134 of the Felix Martinez Building and may be reached at 505-454-3252 or via email at disabilities@nmhu.edu.  Out-of-classroom accommodations are governed by the policy set forth in the previous paragraph. If a student needs auxiliary aids or services to participate in New Mexico Highlands University programs, write to Accessibility Services, New Mexico Highlands University, Box 9000, Las Vegas, NM 87701 or email disabilities@nmhu.edu.

Deadlines
Students are strongly encouraged to document their disability and meet with office staff as early as possibly to ensure that the appropriate accommodations are in place before classes begin. If a situation arises during the semester, accommodations will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis. Accommodations will be in effect from the date of approval of a completed application.

Conduct Notice
Students with disabilities are held responsible for the same university standards of conduct as students without disabilities.

Disability-related records, including medical records, are confidential material and will be protected in accordance with FERPA regulations. Records are only used to assist in providing appropriate academic accommodations to the student.

Service animals are welcome on campus provided they meet all legal requirements. Service animals that present a health or safety threat to the campus community (including cleanliness issues) will be banned from campus unless significant preventive actions are taken by the owner to ensure future compliance.

More information about the policy and procedures relating to services to students with disabilities is in the Accessibility Services Handbook, incorporated herein by reference. This Handbook may be requested from Accessibility Services or may be downloaded from the New Mexico Highlands University website, www.nmhu.edu/access.

Athletics
New Mexico Highlands University is a member of the Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference, NCAA Division II and fields eleven teams: five men’s and six women’s. They include baseball, women and men’s basketball, women and men’s cross-country, football, women’s soccer, softball, women’s track & field, volleyball, and wrestling. NMHU also sponsors Vato’s men’s rugby as a club sport.

Graduate Admissions
Ian Williamson, Ph.D., Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs, Grants, and Contracts

Dean of Graduate Studies, Interim

INBRE Liaison, Professor of Psychology

Office of Graduate Studies

Douglas Hall, Room 136

505-454-3273

E-mail: admissions@nmhu.edu

The application for admission is available on our website at www.nmhu.edu

Academic Calendar
https://www.nmhu.edu/academic-calendar/

Degree-Seeking Students
Students wishing to receive a master’s degree must apply for, and be admitted in, degree-seeking status. Admission may be granted in one of the following categories:

Regular Status
This status is assigned to an applicant who meets all the requirements for admission to graduate study:

  • A 3.0 grade point average;
  • A bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited institution;
  • The required background in the area of proposed study (as required by academic program);
  • The required official transcripts;
  • The required test scores; and,
  • All other requirements identified by the discipline.

Provisional Status
Students who lack one or more of the above criteria may be admitted in provisional status. An attachment to the letter of admission will show the conditions to be satisfied before the applicant may be assigned to regular status. It is the student’s responsibility to initiate the change from provisional to regular status.

No more than 12 credits may be earned in provisional status. A registration hold will be placed on a student’s record if the provisional requirements are not satisfied by the end of the second semester of enrollment.

As per Federal Code of Regulations – 34 CFR 668.32 – Student Eligibility – students must be enrolled in regular admission status to qualify for FSA (Title IV) programs:

Typical conditions to be satisfied for a change from provisional to regular status include the following:

GPA: When a student’s grade point average in undergraduate studies is below 3.0 s/he/ must complete the first 12 graduate credits earning a GPA of 3.0 or better. Certain programs may require that the student earn at least a B in each class of the 12 credits. See the discipline specific graduate handbook for more information or contact the Graduate Coordinator or Department Chair.

Bachelor’s Degree: A student in the final semester or undergraduate study at Highlands or at another regionally accredited institution may be admitted in provisional status pending receipt of the bachelor’s degree. The official transcript showing conferral of the undergraduate degree must be received by midterm of the first semester of graduate study.

Course Deficiencies: If an applicant does not have the appropriate academic background, the graduate program may deny admission or admit the student provisionally. If the program admits the student, it may assign courses to fulfill this requirement. Such courses will be identified in the letter of admission. Some graduate programs identify and require completion of deficiencies before the student can enroll in graduate courses, while others allow students to take them concurrently with other graduate courses. If taken at the graduate level, such courses may become part of the student’s graduate Program of Study. Once the student has fulfilled the requirement, their status will be changed from provisional to regular.

Advanced-Standing Status: Students within 12 semester credits of receiving their bachelor’s degree may apply for, and be admitted to, a graduate program. This status limits enrollment at the graduate level to nine credits. If the undergraduate requirements are not met, the student must reapply for advanced standing status each semester.

On attainment of the undergraduate degree, if other stipulations for regular admission are satisfied, then the status will change to “provisional” until all conditions have been met. If no other conditions have been assigned to the student’s admission, then the status will be “regular.”

In cases where requirements are disputed, the Academic Affairs Committee will render a final decision, upon the recommendation of the Graduate Coordinator or Department Chair and the Dean of Graduate Studies.

First-Time Graduate Applicants from Other Institutions
Students who are in their last semester of undergraduate study at another institution may apply and receive provisional admission. However, the transcript showing conferral of the undergraduate degree must be received by midterm of the first semester of enrollment in graduate study from a regionally accredited university.

First-Time Graduate Applicants from NMHU
Students who are in their last semester of undergraduate study and lack no more than 18 credits of receiving their bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited university may apply for admission and may be admitted as Provisional Status. Students admitted in Provisional Status may not register for graduate courses until they have fulfilled all requirements for their bachelor’s degree.  Provisional Status admittance permits students to apply and compete for scholarships or other opportunities requiring admission to a graduate program. Students should consult with the Financial Aid Office to determine the impact, if any, of this status.

Non-Degree Status
Non-degree status is principally for those who do not expect to work toward an advanced degree at Highlands University. Any person who has an earned bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited institution and is in good standing at the last university attended may be admitted as a non-degree-seeking graduate student. Application for non-degree status may be made at the time of registration. In the application, non-degree-seeking applicants certify that they possess a bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited institution and are in good standing at the last university attended. Applicants are required to have an official copy of the transcript showing the award of the bachelor’s degree sent to the Office of the Registrar before the end of the first semester of registration.

Credits earned as a non-degree graduate student will require the same quality and amount of work as similar credits earned in regular, advanced-standing, and provisional status. Students may earn a maximum of 12 credit hours while in non-degree status.  Credits earned while in non-degree status may be applied towards master’s program of study upon review and approval by the academic dean and admission to graduate program.

Non-degree students are not eligible for financial assistance. Students in a licensure track may be eligible for loans.

General Graduate Admission Requirements
This section of the General Catalog states Highlands University’s general graduate admission policies. Additional information may be required or recommended, and separate procedures or deadlines may be established for specific graduate programs. Applicants must consult the section of the catalog that describes the particular graduate program of interest to them. General admission requirements include:

  • The completed Graduate Application for Admission,
  • the $25 one-time, nonrefundable application fee,
  • official transcripts of all previous college work from a regionally accredited institution
  • and a required essay: check with individual departments to see what they require

Admission cannot be complete until all of these materials have been received in an acceptable form. Application packets are available at the New Mexico Highlands University Application Center: https://apply.nmhu.edu/apply/.

A new application is required for re-enrollment after a seven-year absence. Students should submit the application at least 30 days prior to the start of the semester. As with regular admissions, the Graduate Coordinator and/or the Department Chair will review and approve or deny the application. The approval of readmission is the prerogative of the graduate program. Admission may be determined also by previous academic performance at NMHU and/or other institutions during the absence.

If a second master’s degree or a change in major or concentration outside the college/school is sought, a new application is required, and entrance requirements for that program must be met. No work used toward the first master’s degree may count toward the second degree. Students must have earned their first degree at a regionally accredited university.

Graduate students must have an earned bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution of higher learning and present an acceptable undergraduate program (or evidence of comparable achievement) in the field(s) in which they intend to do graduate work.

Graduate Admission Requirements by Program

Department of Biology

Natural Sciences (MS)
Concentration: Biology

Requirements
Statement of Educational Goals
2 Letters of Recommendation
Transcript with undergraduate degree conferred from a regionally accredited institution (3.0 GPA or higher)
Will consider those who do not meet the GPA requirement.
Have a major or minor in Biology or related field (forestry, environmental sciences, etc.)
Transfer students: GRE but no minimum threshold, waived for NMHU graduates.

Department of Chemistry

Chemistry (MS)
Concentration: Applied Chemistry

Requirements
Statement of Educational Goals
2 Letters of Recommendation
Transcripts from all previously attended regionally accredited institutions (3.0 GPA or higher)
Will consider those who do not meet the GPA requirement.
Resume

Department of Computer & Mathematical Sciences

Media Arts and Computer Science (MS)
Concentration: Computer Science

Requirements
Statement of Educational Goals
2 Letters of Recommendation
Transcripts from all previously attended regionally accredited institutions (3.0 GPA or higher)
Will consider those who do not meet the GPA requirement.

Department of English

English (MA)
Concentrations:
Creative Writing
Linguistics, Literacy and Composition
Literature

Requirements
Statement of Educational Goals
2 Letters of Recommendation
10-15 Page Writing Sample (preferably a critical essay written for an upper level English course, but we would be willing to consider other kinds of samples)
Transcripts from all previously attended regionally accredited institutions (3.0 GPA or higher)
Will consider those who do not meet the GPA requirement.

Department of Exercise and Sports Sciences

Human Performance and Sport (MA)
Concentrations:
Teacher Education
Sports Administration

Requirements
Statement of Educational Goals
2 Letters of Recommendation from Faculty
Transcripts from all previously attended regionally accredited institutions (3.0 GPA or higher)
Will consider those who do not meet the GPA requirement.

Department of History and Political Science

Public Affairs (MA)
Concentrations: Political and Governmental Processes

Requirements
Statement of Educational Goals
2 Letters of Recommendation from Faculty
Transcripts from all previously attended regionally accredited institutions (3.0 GPA or higher)
Will consider those who do not meet the GPA requirement.

Public Affairs (MA)
Concentrations: History

Requirements
Statement of Educational Goals
2 Letters of Recommendation from Faculty
Transcripts (3.0 GPA or higher)
Will consider those who do not meet the GPA requirement.

Southwest Studies (MA)
Concentrations: History and Political Science

Requirements
Statement of Educational Goals
2 Letters of Recommendation from Faculty
Transcripts (3.0 GPA or higher)
Will consider those who do not meet the GPA requirement.

Department of Natural Resources Management

Natural Sciences (MS)
Concentrations: Environmental Science and Management

Requirements
Statement of Educational Goals
2 Letters of Recommendation from Faculty
Transcripts from all previously attended regionally accredited institutions (3.0 GPA or higher)
Will consider those who do not meet the GPA requirement.

Natural Sciences (MS)
Concentration: Geology

Requirements
Statement of Educational Goals
2 Letters of Recommendation from Faculty
Transcripts from all previously attended regionally accredited institutions (3.0 GPA or higher)
Will consider those who do not meet the GPA requirement.

Certificate In Geographical Information Systems (GIS)

Requirements
Statement of Educational Goals
2 Letters of Recommendation from Faculty
Transcripts from all previously attended regionally accredited institutions (3.0 GPA or higher)
Will consider those who do not meet the GPA requirement.

Department of Psychology

Psychology (MS)
Concentrations:
General Psychology
Clinical Psychology/Counseling

Requirements
Statement of Educational Goals (500-word statement outlining educational goals and objectives addressing research interests and experiences (if General or Clinical thesis tracks) or addressing career goals, interests, and experiences (if Clinical non-thesis track.)

2 Letters of Recommendation – at least 1 academic reference (e.g., professor, advisor, etc.), the 2nd letter can be an academic or professional reference. Letters of recommendation from friends or family are not appropriate.
5-page writing sample, preferably a scholarly paper written for an upper division Psychology class.
Transcripts from all previously attended regionally accredited institutions (3.0 GPA or higher). Will consider those who do not meet the GPA requirement.

Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminal Justice

Public Affairs (MA)
Concentration: Applied Sociology

Requirements
Statement of Educational Goals
2 Letters of Recommendation from Faculty
5-page writing sample. A social sciences paper written for a class or for publication is highly desired.
Transcripts from all previously attended regionally accredited institutions (3.0 GPA or higher). Will consider those who do not meet the GPA requirement.

Southwest Studies (MA)
Concentration: Anthropology

Requirements
Statement of Educational Goals
2 Letters of Recommendation from Faculty
Resume
Transcripts from all previously attended regionally accredited institutions (3.0 GPA or higher). Will consider those who do not meet the GPA requirement.

Certificate: Cultural Resource Management

Requirements
Statement of Educational Goals
2 Letters of Recommendation from Faculty
Resume
Transcripts from all previously attended regionally accredited institutions (3.0 GPA or higher). Will consider those who do not meet the GPA requirement.

Visual and Performing Art

Requirements
Statement of Educational Goals
Resume/CV
Portfolio of work— 20 images
2 Letters of Recommendation from Faculty
Transcripts from all previously attended regionally accredited institutions (3.0 GPA or higher)
Will consider those who do not meet the GPA requirement.

School of Business, Media, and Technology

Master in Business Administration (MBA)
Concentrations:

Accounting
Entrepreneurship
Finance
Human Resources
International Business
Management
Marketing

Certificates:
      Accounting
Financial
Human Resource Management
Marketing

Requirements 

Domestic Applicants
Transcripts from all previously attended regionally accredited institutions (3.0 GPA or higher). Will consider those who do not meet the GPA requirement.

International Applicants
Statement of Educational Goals
2 Letters of Recommendation from Faculty
Transcripts from all previously attended regionally accredited institutions (3.0 GPA or higher). Will consider those who do not meet the GPA requirement.
TOEFL or IELTS English Score
Transcript evaluation (WES)

Master of Fine Arts (MFA)
Concentration: Cultural Technology

Requirements
Personal Objective Statement (600-1,000 words) demonstrating writing capabilities, which addresses the following: purpose in seeking an MFA in Cultural Technology degree at NMHU Media Arts & Technology, research interests, personal and technical strengths; what you bring to our program.

Link to an online portfolio of best/relevant work, including detailed descriptions (2-d work: 10-20 samples, video: not more than approximately 5 min. reel) which demonstrates proficiency, research or exploration in: photography, videography, digital imaging, writing, exhibition, design, code, games, or hardware projects.

3 letters of recommendation from individuals familiar with the students’ abilities, work experience, and personal characteristics.

Transcripts from all previously attended regionally accredited institutions (3.0 GPA or higher).

Resume/CV

A phone or video interview with program faculty may be requested before final acceptance.

Master of Software Systems Design (MSSD)

Requirements 
Statement of Educational Goals demonstrating writing capabilities, which addresses the following: purpose in seeking a MSSD degree emphasis at NMHU Media Arts & Technology, research interests, personal and technical strengths; what you bring to our program.

Portfolio of work—at least 2 projectsSource code upload Github Link

3 Letters of Recommendation

Transcripts from all previously attended regionally accredited institutions (3.0 GPA or higher). Will consider those who do not meet the GPA requirement.

Department of Counseling & Guidance

Counseling (MA): Concentrations

Clinical Mental Health
Clinical Rehabilitation
School Counseling
Rehabilitation Counseling
Rehabilitation Counseling with Specialization in Vocational Evaluation

Requirements
Statement of Educational Goals (350-500 words) specifically describing what motivates you to apply to this graduate program/certificate? How do you hope this will contribute to your future career and professional goals? Additionally, what do you hope to contribute to the counseling profession?

2 Dispositions-focused References
Resume
Transcripts from all previously attended regionally accredited institutions (3.0 GPA or higher). Will consider those who do not meet the GPA requirement.

Certificates:
Applicant must already have a Master’s Degree in Counseling. Qualifies a person to apply for the indicated NM credentials.

Professional Counseling (Licensed Mental Health Counselor)
Rehabilitation Counseling (CRC, PED K-12)
School Counseling (PED K-12)

Requirements
Same requirements as MA

Department of Curriculum and Instruction

Curriculum & Instruction (MA):

Emphasis Areas:
Bilingual Education
Reading
Teaching English as a second language (TESOL)
Gifted and Talented Education
Alternative Teacher Licensure Program
Early Childhood Multicultural Education
Or a specific content area (e.g.  math, English, history, science, etc.)

Requirements
Statement of Educational Goals (500-700 words) specifically describing what motivates you to apply to this graduate program/certificate? How do you hope this will contribute to your future career and professional goals?
2 Professional Dispositions
Provide verification of teaching licensure or equivalent experience (waive for international students)
Transcripts from all previously attended regionally accredited institutions (3.0 GPA or higher). Will consider those who do not meet the GPA requirement.

Certificates:
Alternative Teacher Licensure Program
Advanced placement
Bilingual education
Reading
Secondary education
Teaching English as a second language (TESOL)

Requirements
Same requirements as MA

Department of Educational Leadership

Educational Leadership (MA)
Statement of Educational Goals specifically describing what motivates you to apply to this graduate program/certificate? How do you hope this will contribute to your future career and professional goals?

2 Professional Dispositions
Transcripts from all previously attended regionally accredited institutions (3.0 GPA or higher). Will consider those who do not meet the GPA requirement.

Certificate: Educational Leadership

Requirements
Same requirements as MA

Department of Special Education

Special Education (MA)

Concentration: Gifted and Talented Education

Requirements

Statement of Educational Goals specifically describing: What motivates you to apply to this graduate program? How do you hope this degree will contribute to your future career and professional goals?

Transcripts from all previously attended regionally accredited institutions (3.0 GPA or higher). Students may be conditionally admitted if they do not meet the GPA requirement.

Social Work

Social Work (MSW) 2-year

Concentrations:
Clinical Practice Concentration (offered at all sites)
Bilingual/Bicultural Clinical (offered in Albuquerque, Rio Rancho)
Leadership and Administration (offered at all sites)

Requirements
Personal Narrative (3-4 pages)

1. Describe your personal, professional, and academic experiences as they relate to your interest in the profession of social work. Include any specific work or volunteer experience you have had in helping/advocating for other persons. Explain how these experiences have contributed to your decision to pursue graduate study in the profession of social work.

2. Describe any life, volunteer, work, or school experiences that have contributed to your understanding of and desire to work with vulnerable or marginalized groups, ethnic and cultural minorities, and other diverse populations.

3. Discuss your understanding of the social work profession and address how your experience and character will benefit you in becoming an effective social worker. What skills and knowledge do you want to develop through your social work education? What do you currently see as your strengths and limitations?

Bachelor’s Degree from a regionally accredited institution.

Transcripts from all previously attended regionally accredited institutions (3.0 GPA or higher). Will consider those who do not meet the 3.0 GPA requirement.

3 Professional References

Resume inclusive of employment and volunteer experience

Application fee $50, $35 for NMHU Graduates

Social Work (MSW) Advanced Standing
(
all sites)

Requirements
Personal Narrative (3-4 pages)

1. Describe your personal, professional, and academic experiences as they relate to your interest in the profession of social work. Include any specific work or volunteer experience you have had in helping/advocating for other persons. Explain how these experiences have contributed to your decision to pursue graduate study in the profession of social work.

2. Describe any life, volunteer, work, or school experiences that have contributed to your understanding of and desire to work with vulnerable or marginalized groups, ethnic and cultural minorities, and other diverse populations.

3. Discuss your understanding of the social work profession and address how your experience and character will benefit you in becoming an effective social worker. What skills and knowledge do you want to develop through your social work education? What do you currently see as your strengths and limitations?

Bachelor’s Degree from a regionally accredited institution. Specifically requires a recent (less than 5 years old) Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) degree from a college or institution that is fully accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE).

Transcripts from all previously attended regionally accredited institutions (3.5 GPA or higher).  GPA of 3.5 applies only to Social Work courses (non-cumulative GPA. Transcripts from NMHU are not required.

Will consider those who do not meet the 3.5 GPA requirement.

3 Professional References

Client Assessment located in application

Resume inclusive of employment and volunteer experience

Application fee $50, $35 for NMHU Graduates

MSW/MBA Dual Degree Program
(Leadership & Administration MSW/Human Resource Management MBA)

(offered at all sites)

*Applications are forwarded to the School of Business during the Fall term.  Admission to Social Work does not guarantee admission to the School of Business.  If an application is denied by the School of Business, the student can continue in the MSW.  Applicants are usually notified by the School of Business during the Fall term.

Requirements
Personal Narrative (3-4 pages)

1. Describe your personal, professional, and academic experiences as they relate to your interest in the profession of social work. Include any specific work or volunteer experience you have had in helping/advocating for other persons. Explain how these experiences have contributed to your decision to pursue graduate study in the profession of social work.

2. Describe any life, volunteer, work, or school experiences that have contributed to your understanding of and desire to work with vulnerable or marginalized groups, ethnic and cultural minorities, and other diverse populations.

3. Discuss your understanding of the social work profession and address how your experience and character will benefit you in becoming an effective social worker. What skills and knowledge do you want to develop through your social work education? What do you currently see as your strengths and limitations?

Bachelor’s Degree from a regionally accredited institution.

Transcripts from all previously attended regionally accredited institutions (3.0 GPA or higher)

Will consider those who do not meet the 3.0 GPA requirement.

3 Professional References

Resume inclusive of employment and volunteer experience

Application fee $50, $35 for NMHU Graduates

International Student AdmissionDetailed procedure for admission of international students is available from the NMHU website at https://www.nmhu.edu/international/

For detailed information, contact the International Education Center. 

Electronic means: International_ed@nmhu.edu.

Written communication:
New Mexico Highlands University
International Education Center
NMHU Box 9000
Las Vegas, NM 87701 USA

Telephonically:
From outside the United States: 001.505-454-3372
From within the United States: 1-505-454-3372

International students apply through the University website at https://www.nmhu.edu/international-admissions/

Requirements for international students who seek admission to Highlands University:

  1. A complete application
  2. A $25.00 application fee
  3. Undergraduate or Graduate students seeking a second bachelor degree or seeking to transfer credits from a University or college outside of the United States must submit:

A transcript evaluation by a credential evaluation service that is a current member of the National Association of Credential Evaluation Services (NACES) https://myiee.org/create-account.php or a current member of the Association of International Credential Evaluators (AICE). http://aice-eval.org/

Evaluations must include the educational degree equivalency, grade point average and course-by-course analysis.

  1. Provide evidence of the command of the English Language

Applicants from countries in which English is an official language, but not the language of the majority or the language of instruction will be required to submit test scores to give evidence of an adequate command of the English language by earning a satisfactory score on any of the following English tests:

TOEFL
www.toefl.org
Written  500
Computer 173
Internet 61

TOEFL for Business Applicants
Written  540
Computer 207
Internet 76

IELTS  
www.ielts.org
Internet 5.5

IELTS for Business Applicants
Internet 6

GTEC (Global Test of English Communication)
Internet 1051

GTECT for Business Applicants
Internet 1151

STEP Eiken
Internet Grade 2A or 2150

Exceptions for providing evidence of adequate command of the English language are:

Persons holding citizenship in English-speaking countries.

Applicants holding citizenship in a country where the English language is an official language and the means of instruction. Information regarding testing may be obtained from:

TOEFL Services
Educational Testing Service
P.O. Box 6151
Princeton, NJ 08541-6151, USA
609-771-7100 or 877-863-3546

www.ets.org/toefl/

(Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. – 7:45 p.m. Eastern Time (New York), except for U.S. holidays)

609-771-7714 – TTY (24 hours a day, seven days a week for test takers who are deaf or hearing impaired)

                          Courier or Delivery Service (UPS, FED-EX, DHL)

TOEFL Services (25Q-310)
Distribution and Receiving Center
225 Phillips Boulevard
Ewing, NJ 08618-1426, USA

                          IELTS Services
                          www.ielts.org/contact_us.aspx

Step Eiken
www.eiken.or.jp/
https://www.eiken.or.jp/ielts/en/contact/

                          GTEC
                          https://www.benesse.co.jp/gtec/fs/

  1. A completed Financial Certificate form and official bank statements for the purpose of issuing

U.S. visa documents (I-20 or DS-2019).

International students must be formally admitted to the University before the process to issue student visa documents (I-20 or DS-2019) can begin. Receipt of an I-20 or DS-2019 document is required for the purpose of seeking a student visa in F-1 or J-1 student visa classification to study in the United States.  

International Undergraduate applicants (students seeking a bachelor’s degree)

  1. Submit a completed and signed application through the University website at https://www.nmhu.edu/international-admissions/. 
  1. Upload a copy of a verifiable High School Diploma or Certificate of Completions that is equivalent to a U.S. High School Diploma.

In some cases, official transcripts from the institution where secondary education was completed may be required and must be mailed or electronically emailed directly from the issuing school.

Electronic meansInternational_ed@nmhu.edu.

Written communication:
New Mexico Highlands University
International Education Center
NMHU Box 9000
Las Vegas, NM 87701 USA

Certificates or transcripts in a foreign language must be officially translated into English.

International Graduate Applicants (Seeking a Master Degree)

  1. Submit a completed and signed application through the University website at https://www.nmhu.edu/international-admissions/.
  2. Upload transcripts at the bachelor level and
  3. Arrange for the bachelor level granting institution to either mail or email official transcripts by: 

Electronic meansInternational_ed@nmhu.edu.

Written communication:
New Mexico Highlands University
International Education Center
NMHU Box 9000
Las Vegas, NM 87701 USA

Certificates or transcripts in a foreign language must be officially translated into English.

  1. Upload additional required documents through the on-line application system. Some master’s degree programs may require additional documentation for consideration.

Reactivation of Status
Students who do not register for classes for two or more consecutive semesters must submit the Reactivation of Status form for approval first to the Graduate Coordinator and/or Department Chair of their graduate program, and then to the Office of Graduate Studies. Approval of the reactivation of status is the prerogative of the graduate program. The Reactivation of Status form is accessible on the NMHU Online Documents.

Academic Policies and Procedures

Records
The Office of the Registrar is responsible for the maintenance of the educational records at New Mexico Highlands University. This includes, but is not limited to, student transcripts, academic folders and faculty grade reports. The following information refers to some of the policies and procedures for educational records. Note: Proper photo identification (driver’s license, NMHU Student ID card, passport or other state or federally issued identification) is required for all in-person transactions at any office within the University.  Student’s calling in to any office within the University, for assistance will be required to provide their Student Id number and possibly other identifiable information such as date of birth, mailing address, email address, and perhaps other information (social security numbers is not an option).

Privacy Rights
The following information has been designated as directory information and is subject to release to the public under the Buckley Amendment (PL 98-380), “The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974:” student’s name, address, telephone number, date and place of birth, student ID number, honors and awards and dates of attendance.

Other information regarding disclosure of student data is posted at the Registrar’s Office in compliance with the Act. Requests for withholding directory information must be filed in writing with the Office of the Registrar.

Student Email
All NMHU students are assigned a New Mexico Highlands University email account. This account must be used for “Official” University communication between students, faculty, and staff members. Students may also use this account to communicate with family and friends. Please note that the password must be changed from the default password to something different. Before you can log into Desire2Learn, the password needs to be six characters long or longer and have a capital letter as well as a number. The default password is your birthday in the form of MM/DD/YYYY (EXAMPLE: Sep181969). You cannot reuse the default password. Your username and password provide access computer labs and other University services, such as Desire2Learn, Libraries, and Self-Service Banner. Look for student email access instructions on our NMHU home page at http://www.nmhu.edu/information-technology-services/technical-help-for-students/

NMHU Student ID (Banner ID)
New Mexico Highlands University does not use your Social Security Number to identify your account. You are assigned a Banner ID when you are admitted to the university, and will use the assigned ID number for all official University business. You can find your Banner ID in the top right corner of the screen when you log in to My NMHU Self Service Banner (@00999999).

Social Security Numbers in Student Records
As required by law, social security numbers are collected from prospective and current students who are either applying for admission to the university or plan to seek employment on campus. The social security number is a confidential record and is maintained as such by the university in accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act.

In addition, the university is mandated by federal tax regulations to provide tuition and fee payment information to the student and the Internal Revenue Service so that applicable educational tax credits may be computed. The social security number will be necessary to submit this tax reporting.

Purging of Student Files
All academic files for students who attend New Mexico Highlands University are kept for seven years following the student’s final enrollment. Only archival documentation will be retained. The files of students who do not enroll for one year after being admitted are destroyed.

Degree Audit
Degree Audit is a Web-based tool for students to monitor their academic progress toward degree completion. Degree Audit allows students and their advisers to plan future academic coursework. To access Degree Audit is www.nmhu.edu log-in to MY NMHU (Self-Service Banner). After you have logged into the secure area, click on Student, then Student Records, then the Degree Audit link.

Registration Periods
Registration periods are announced for the fall and spring semesters and the summer session each year. The specific dates, locations, and procedures are stated online on the schedule of classes for each semester or session. The schedule of classes may be viewed online at https://www.nmhu.edu/academic-calendar/.

The New Mexico Highlands University registration process includes (1) Academic advising with a faculty or staff academic advisor, (2) registering for classes online or in person in the Office of the Registrar, or at the Center(s); and (3) paying the tuition and fee bill in full or making payment arrangements through the Business Office two weeks prior to the start of the full semester. Online registration is available through Self-Service Banner through the MyNMHU portal button on our website at www.nmhu.edu. For additional information or assistance regarding registering for classes, call 505-454-3438. For specific semester registration, drop and withdrawal dates, refer to the appropriate schedule of classes available online at https://www.nmhu.edu/academic-calendar/.

Approved Schedules
Each student’s selection of courses is subject to approval by the assigned academic adviser. Requests for any exceptions to university academic regulations are reviewed by the Office of Academic Affairs for compliance with general university requirements. Students’ course selections are subject to review, and a student may be withdrawn from a class if enrollment in the class violates an academic regulation of the university (such as those regulating course levels and maximum loads).

Auditing a Class or Classes
Audited classes do not count toward any graduation requirements of the university and are recorded with an AU on the student’s transcript. Students registered for audited courses must attend a minimum of 70 percent of the scheduled class sessions.

Students who wish to audit must request this status at the time of registering for the class or through an official change to the approved schedule of classes. Changes from audit to credit or credit to audit may only be made with the instructor approval during the first eight weeks of a semester or the first four weeks of a summer session. Any changes after the deadline will require approval from the Provost. The exact deadline for changing the credit/audit status of courses is stated in the schedule of classes for each term.

Changes to the Approved Schedule of Classes
Changes to a student’s approved schedule of classes must be made through the Office of the Registrar weekdays between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. See the schedule of classes for additional information https://banweb.nmhu.edu/prod/wwckschd.p_disp_dyn_sched.

Instructors do not drop or withdraw students from classes. It is the student’s responsibility to do so. Students who wish to drop or withdraw from all their classes must complete the formal procedure for withdrawing from school. Students who remain enrolled in a class after the deadline to withdraw will receive a grade (other than a “W”) in the class.

Add, Drop, and Withdrawal Policies
The policy and deadlines for adding, dropping and withdrawing from courses comply with state and federal policies, and are designed to help students understand their financial and academic obligations to a course or courses.  Additionally, courses may be cancelled if under-enrolled and faculty’s planning for instruction may be affected by the number of enrolled students.  Students who add or drop late may have a disruptive impact on faculty and other students in the course.

Add, drop, and withdrawal deadlines, therefore, help the university provide appropriate resources to faculty and courses. Students who add courses after they have begun are responsible for making up all missed work in consultation with their instructors. The registration process, to include adding and dropping classes, can be completed using the University’s automated process.

Adding, Dropping, and Withdrawing from Courses (for full-term courses)
The first six days of the semester constitutes the late registration period. The six days begin on the first day of semester to include weekends. The total number of credits allowed is subject to limits stated elsewhere in this section. Students may drop courses through the first nine days of the semester. The nine days begin on the first day of the semester to include weekends.  Tuition charges will be adjusted when adding and dropping courses. Dropped courses will not appear on the student’s transcript. After the drop period, students may withdraw from courses.

Withdrawals from individual courses are allowed through the Friday of the 10th week of the semester. Payment is required for tuition and fees as described elsewhere in this catalog for all withdrawn courses. The course(s) will remain on the student’s transcript, recorded with a grade of “W.” In addition, students will be required to pay tuition charges and fees for any courses in which they are enrolled after the end of the late registration period, even though they subsequently withdrew from them. (The late registration period is defined above.)

Any courses added to student’s original schedule throughout the semester might result in overload tuition charges.

For a complete list of dates please click on the Important Information link at the following website: https://banweb.nmhu.edu/prod/wwckschd.p_disp_dyn_sched

Adding, Dropping, and Withdrawing Courses (for 8-week sessions)
The first three days of the eight-week session constitutes the late registration period.  The three days begin on the first day of the course to include weekends. Students may drop courses through the first four days of the course. The four days begin on the first day of the course to include weekends. Tuition charges will be adjusted when adding and dropping courses. A dropped course will not appear on the student’s transcript. After the drop period, students may withdraw from individual courses. Students withdrawing from courses after the drop period are required to pay tuition and fees as described elsewhere in this catalog. The course(s) will remain on the student’s transcript, recorded with a grade of “W.” For the last day to request a complete session withdraw from an 8-week session, refer to the online schedule of courses.  Summer courses shorter than 8 weeks will be defined as “Short Term” courses.

Adding, Dropping, and Withdrawing (from Short-Term Courses)
Short Term Courses are defined as courses that meet less than the regular full semester (16 weeks during Fall and Spring terms. Courses will differ in the Summer session students shall consult with the Office of the Registrar for specific dates related to the Summer session). Short Term Courses may include intercession courses that meet in-between regular semesters, courses that meet during the regular semester but for fewer than 16 weeks, courses that meet during the summer semester but fewer than 8 weeks, and courses meeting over the weekends.

The last day to add a short-term course is the first day of the course. The last day to drop is the first day of the course.  For courses meeting more than one week, the last day to withdraw from a short-term course is the last business day of the course session, but at least seven days (to include weekends) before the last day of that term. For courses meeting less than one week, the last day to withdraw from a short-term course is the second day the course is scheduled to meet.

Adding, Dropping, and Withdrawing for Independent Study or Directed Study Courses
Students who wish to add an independent study or directed study course must do so following the policy for full-term courses as described above. All other term policies (add, drop, withdraw, tuition payment and fees) apply.

Complete School Withdrawals
Complete school withdrawals are allowed through the Friday before the scheduled finals week for that part of term. Payment is required for tuition and fees as described elsewhere in this catalog for all withdrawn courses. The course(s) will remain on the student’s transcript, recorded with a grade of  “W.”

Retroactive Add, Drop or Withdrawing
Students may petition for retroactive add, drop or withdrawal from classes if they can substantiate hardship with the above scheduling policies. Petitions may be obtained through online documents http://its.nmhu.edu/www/onlinedocs/index.html. The student routes retroactive add, drop, or withdrawal petitions through the instructor(s) of record and the department chair/program coordinator for approval or disapproval. The program coordinator/chair then routes the form for recommendation to the comptroller or designee in the business office, who then forwards to the Director of Financial Aid or designee, and who then forwards to the academic dean of the student’s major.

For complicated or disputed petitions, the dean may forward the petitions to the Graduate Appeals Subcommittee of Academic Affairs for review and recommendation. Based on the information gathered, the dean makes the final determination to grant or deny the petition. The dean then notifies the student, the registrar, the financial aid office, and the business office of the decision.

There is a one-year statute of limitations on retroactive add, drop, or withdraw petitions; in extreme circumstances, retroactive add/drop/withdraw petitions may still be forwarded directly to the graduate dean for consideration after the one-year statute has expired.

Recommended timeline for action is as follows:

  1. a) 11 working days for set of recommendations from the instructor, program coordinator/chair, and representatives of the financial aid and business offices.
  2. b) 6 working days for a decision by the dean after receipt from chair or subcommittee.
  3. c) 11 working days for a decision by the subcommittee.

Right to Petition for Hardship
Students are entitled to petition for relief of an unfair academic hardship brought about by any university policy or regulation. Academic petitions can be found under online documents from the New Mexico Highlands University webpage at http://its.nmhu.edu/www/onlinedocs/index.html.

There are specialized forms for retroactive adds, retroactive drops, retroactive withdrawals, grade appeals, and academic hardship petitions. Please consult the Registrar’s Office for more information. There is a two-year statute of limitations on academic petitions. In exceptional circumstances, academic petitions filed after a two-year period shall be submitted directly to the Graduate Office for consideration.

All academic hardship petitions are obtained through online documents http://its.nmhu.edu/www/onlinedocs/index.html and must be typed. Petition procedures are as follows:

  1. Students must submit academic petitions to their advisor and the program coordinator/department chair along with any supporting documentation for consideration. The student must include a copy of their degree audit.
  1. The student is responsible for obtaining the signature indicating approval or disapproval from the academic advisor in their major. The advisor or student then routes the form through the program coordinator/department chair and the academic dean, who indicate their approvals or disapprovals, and then forward to the Graduate Office. If the hardship petition involves financial issues, input from the comptroller or designee in the business office and the Director of Financial Aid or designee will be obtained.
  1. After the Graduate Office receives the petition, the graduate dean may send complicated or disputed petitions to the Academic Affairs Graduate Appeals Subcommittee. The subcommittee will further review and provide a recommendation to the graduate dean before the final university decision is made.
  1. At the discretion of the Academic Affairs Graduate Appeals Subcommittee, the subcommittee may hold a hearing before making a recommendation to the Academic Affairs Office. The subcommittee will establish any rules regarding fair procedure for the hearing, and let the student know at least one week in advance of the hearing through university email.
  1. After the hearing, members of the subcommittee shall vote to support or not support the petition. Their recommendation, along with the individual members’ votes, will be sent to the graduate dean.
  1. The graduate dean makes the final decision to approve or deny the petition. The graduate dean then notifies the student, the registrar, the dean, and the chair of the AAC subcommittee (if applicable) of the decision. If financial changes result from an approval, the financial aid and business office are also notified.
  1. The suggested timeline for action under normal circumstances after receipt by each office is:
  2. a) Eleven (11) working days for the complete set of recommendations from the advisor, chair/program coordinator, and dean.
  3. b) Six (6) working days for a final decision by the graduate dean after a petition is received either from the program coordinator/chair or the subcommittee.
  4. c) Eleven (11) working days for the recommendation by the subcommittee or sixteen (16) working days if a hearing is required.

Adding and Dropping Classes (for Independent Study, Research, or Directed Study classes)
Independent study, independent research, and directed stud forms can be found at http://its.nmhu.edu/www/onlinedocs/index.html. Adding or dropping independent studies, research, or directed studies requires approval from the relevant faculty members(s), chair, and dean of the student’s major. If approval is granted, the student is still responsible for course registration.

Withdrawing from the University
If a student wishes to withdraw from New Mexico Highlands University, the student must do so officially through the Registrar’s Office. Students who are unable to personally appear must contact the Registrar by phone, letter, email (registrar@nmhu.edu), or fax (505-454-3552) to request assistance in completing the process of withdrawing. The last day to withdraw from classes is subject to change and is reflected in yearly academic calendars at https://www.nmhu.edu/academic-calendar/ and is published in the Important Information document with the Summary Class Schedule on My NMHU.

Please refer to the Tuition, Fees and Financial Policies section of this catalog for a schedule of deadlines for full or partial refunds of tuition and fees.

Regarding Tuition and Fees
If a formal withdrawal from school occurs within the drop period, no courses will appear on the transcript for that term. If a formal withdrawal occurs after the drop period, grades of W are entered for the classes. Students who leave school without completing an official withdrawal from school will receive grades of F for that term. The last day to withdraw from school may coincide with the last day to withdraw from class. For specific dates and deadlines, please refer to the Tuition, Fees and Financial Policies section of this catalog.

Credit Hours Defined
All classes must conform to the Federal Credit Hour Definition below. By policy, assignment of credit hours is overseen and approved by the Academic Affairs Committee, the department chair, the dean, and the provost, via the Academic Affairs Committee and the Office of Academic Affairs.

Federal Credit Hour Definition:
A credit hour is an amount of work represented in intended learning outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement that is an institutionally established equivalency that reasonably approximates not less than:

(I.) One hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out-of-class student work each week for approximately 15 weeks for one semester or trimester hour of credit, or 10 to 12 weeks for one quarter hour of credit, or the equivalent amount of work over a different amount of time; or

(II) At least an equivalent amount of work as required in Paragraph I of this definition for other activities as established by an institution, including laboratory work, online/distance/hybrid courses, internships, practica, studio work, and other academic work leading toward to the award of credit hours. 34CFR 600.2 (11/1/2010)

Regular lecture courses must meet 750 minutes per credit hour and must include time for breaks. Labs require twice as much time (see the University Catalog course description for definition of specific labs). Courses that have unrestricted time, such as thesis, field project, etc., will be listed as TBA (to be announced).

Graduate Student Loads during a Semester
Each student’s selection of courses is subject to approval by the assigned academic adviser and the dean in the student’s major field. Requests for any exceptions to university academic regulations are then reviewed by the Office of Graduate Studies for compliance with general university requirements. Students’ course selections are subject to review, and a student may be withdrawn from a class if enrollment in it violates an academic regulation of the university (such as those regulating course levels and maximum loads).

Nine graduate credit hours constitute a full load for graduate students; the maximum load per semester for full-time graduate students is 16 semester hours. For students with full graduate assistantships, the maximum load is 12 hours. A maximum of six hours is recommended for persons in full-time employment. Overloads will be allowed only in exceptional cases of demonstrated superior performance and must be approved by the adviser or school dean and by the chief academic officer. An absolute maximum course load is 20 hours of credit in a semester. A full-time graduate student is advised against employment for more than 20 hours per week, including graduate assistantship service requirements.

Graduate Student Loads during a Summer Session
Graduate students may register for no more than nine semester hours of credit during the summer session; the recommended maximum load is six semester credits. Summer session students with six or more credits are identified as full-time students.

Students may not enroll in graduate courses in deficiency areas until appropriate prerequisites are completed. If a recommended prerequisite is at the 4000-5000 levels, the student may be permitted to take the 5000-level offering, but the course will be required in addition to the minimum 32 credit hours needed for the master’s degree.

Course Numbers and Levels
Graduate Division: Courses numbered from 5000 through 5990 are for graduate students; undergraduate students may be enrolled in the same course under a 4000 number. In this case, the graduate students in 5000-level courses will be required to demonstrate graduate-level proficiency in the work. Graduate students must enroll in the graduate course number. No undergraduate course will count toward the graduate degree. Undergraduate students must enroll in the undergraduate course number. No graduate course will count toward the undergraduate degree. Courses numbered 6000 or above are only for graduate students.

Only undergraduates with advanced standing and graduate students may enroll in 5000-level courses. The 5000-level course taken by an undergraduate with advanced standing will only apply to the graduate degree and not to the undergraduate degree.

Only graduate students may enroll in 6000-level courses. No exceptions may be made to this rule.

Distance Education
The distance learning modalities (online course types) offered at New Mexico Highlands University fall under one of the six following categories.

The face-to-face delivery modality is the traditional instructional method in which students and faculty meet at the same physical location at the same time. The face-to-face modality is not a distance learning modality, but is integral to some of the distance learning modalities. Therefore, there are seven course types at New Mexico Highlands University: face-to-face, enhanced, interactive video conferencing, hybrid, blended, synchronous, and asynchronous.

Enhanced
Enhanced delivery is a traditional, face-to-face class that meets at regularly scheduled times in a physical classroom. Then, faculty use an online learning management system (LMS) to communicate with students and provide access to course content and resources. For example, Enhanced Delivery uses the LMS as a supplement to a face-to-face class, which is the primary mode of learning. 

Interactive Video Conferencing (IVC)
Faculty and students are based at a University facility, and instruction is delivered synchronously by video conferencing to classrooms at remote sites. (Formerly known as Interactive Television, or ITV.) For example, face-to-face instruction occurs in a campus classroom while being broadcast live, in real time, to classrooms at sites. 

Hybrid
Hybrid courses use multiple synchronous delivery modalities (face-to face, web conferencing, teleconferencing, and/or IVC). For example, a course will have a fixed lecture time to facilitate discussion of class topics or to present assigned projects through distance. Although the class will be taught at a physical location, some students will be participating at remote locations live, in real-time, through the use of various instructional technologies. 

Blended
Blended courses combine synchronous and asynchronous (non-simultaneous) delivery modalities. A portion of the face-to-face and/or IVC instruction (contact-time) is replaced by web-based learning activities. The asynchronous portion of class dialogue does not occur live, in real-time, but happens through web-based learning activities (course emails, discussion forums, blogs, etc.). For example, a Blended class may meet face-to-face every other week, but require asynchronous web-based instruction for the alternating weeks. 

Synchronous
Synchronous delivery is distance learning in which instruction and learning occur at the same time, but not necessarily in the same physical location. Students and instructors meet in regularly scheduled weekly sessions. For example, faculty will present content live, and allow the students to discuss the content and raise questions within a virtual classroom. Students and faculty communicate live, in real-time.

Asynchronous
Asynchronous delivery is online learning in which all content is delivered online with no requirement for synchronous (simultaneous) activities. Delivery of asynchronous teaching and learning enables faculty and students to address course content without being online at the same time. For example, students participate in web-based learning activities; asynchronous class dialogue does not occur live, in real-time, but happens through web-based learning activities (course emails, discussion forums, blogs, etc.).

Grades and Grading Policies
This section states policies regarding grades given at Highlands University, computation of grade averages, and academic warnings. Effective Fall 2015, a fractional grading system was adopted. Faculty have discretion is using fractional grading.

Grade Appeal
The appeal for a grade change is a very serious matter with regard to the academic rights of both the professor and the student. All grade appeals must be initiated within one year of the assignment of the original grade. No grade appeal will be considered unless the student has made a bona fide effort to resolve the matter with the professor. The student must submit the completed form to the School/College Dean for review and discussion with the student. The School/College Dean will request that the professor respond to the appeal. If the school dean is unable to resolve the situation, the School/College Dean will submit both forms to the Office of Academic Affairs for resolution by the Academic Affairs Committee.

Further policy information is available on the Grade Appeal Form that is accessible through online documents at https://www.nmhu.edu/.

Graduate Grades
The following grades are reported for graduate students at the university. As appropriate, they appear on midterm reports, semester or summer term grade reports, and transcripts.

A+ = Excellent (4 points)

A = Excellent (4 points)

A-= Excellent (3.7 points)

B+ = Above Average (3.3 points)

B =Above Average (3 points)

B- = Above Average (2.7 points)

C+ = Average (2.3 points)

C = Average (2 points)

D = Below Average, but passing (1 point)

F = Failure (0 points)

Some programs may have stricter scholastic requirements; students must check with their academic adviser.

Marks
The following marks are reported for graduate and graduate students at the university. As appropriate, they appear on midterm reports, semester or summer term grade reports, and transcripts.

W – Withdrawal from the Class. Regulations for the W grade are stated in this catalog.

AU – Audit. No credit is given for the course, but attendance is required in at least 70 percent of the scheduled class sessions.

S – Satisfactory. Used for proficiency courses and some developmental courses, some practicum courses, institutes, workshops, field project, and the completed thesis. Indicates satisfactory completion of course requirements.

R – Repeat. Used exclusively for developmental and proficiency courses. Indicates that course requirements have not been satisfied and that the course must be repeated to satisfy the proficiency requirement.

U – Unsatisfactory. Used for proficiency courses and some developmental courses. Indicates unsatisfactory in course requirements.

PR – Progress. Used only for thesis, field project, senior readings, and some practicum courses (and as a midterm grade for graduate seminar courses). Indicates that acceptable progress has been made. To receive a permanent grade of S, the student re-reregisters for the course until the course requirements are completed.

NP – No Progress. Used for thesis, field project, senior readings, some practicum courses, and as a midterm grade for graduate seminar courses to indicate that acceptable progress has not been made.

I – Incomplete. Given at the discretion of the course instructor only when circumstances beyond the student’s control prevent completion of course requirements within the established time. The student requests an incomplete in lieu of a final course grade from the instructor, whose approval is required. The instructor reports the “I” and files a form with the Office of the Registrar documenting the work requiring completion and other conditions. An incomplete not completed within one calendar year automatically becomes an F for both undergraduate and graduate students. (The instructor has the option of setting a terminal date of less than one year.) Students should not re-reregister for a course in which they have an “I”; if they do so, the “I” will become an F at the time when a grade is awarded in the registered course. Students are responsible for tuition for any repeated course.

CR – Credit. Used only for transfer credits.

Graduate Grade Point Average
Following are the allowable grades and associated grade points for graduate students:

A+ = 4.00 A = 4.00 A- = 3.7 B+ = 3.3 B = 3.00 B- = 2.7 C+ = 2.3 C = 2.00 D = 1.00 F = 0.0

The sum of the earned quality points is divided by the number of credits to calculate the grade point average (GPA). The following is a sample calculation:

A student earns the following grades in five classes during a certain semester:

4 hrs. A = 16.0 pts.

6 hrs. B = 18.0 pts.

3 hrs. C = 6.0 pts.

2 hrs. D = 2.0 pts.

15 hrs. = 42.0 pts.

GPA calculation is: 42.0 ÷ 15 = 2.80 grade point average.

GPA requirements are stated in subsequent sections.

Satisfactory Academic Progress
Students who maintain the minimum academic standards shown in the scale below will be considered in good academic standing and will be considered to have demonstrated satisfactory academic progress. Students must show evidence of satisfactory progress toward a college degree to avoid academic probation and dismissal, and to continue to be eligible for financial aid through most financial aid programs.

Cumulative Credit Hours Graded       Required (GPA)

1-9 graduate credits graded                 2.75 cumulative GPA

9 or more graduate credits graded      3.0 cumulative GPA

Repetition of a Course
A student may repeat any course, but will receive credit only once toward degree requirements and graduation unless otherwise noted in this catalog. The most recent grade received will be used in the calculation of the cumulative grade point average. Course Repeat Forms are available in the Office of the Registrar and must be completed by the student who is repeating a course. The student’s transcript will be coded to reflect that the course was repeated, and the cumulative grade point average will be adjusted. Repeat coursework may not be eligible for financial aid and students are advised to consult with the Financial Aid Office prior to repeating any course.

Midterm Grades
The faculty submits midterm grades for each student in each class to the Office of the Registrar in the fall and spring semesters according to the schedule announced in the online schedule of classes. (No midterm grades are submitted for short-term courses.) These grades are displayed for viewing by the student on the New Mexico Highlands University secure website, www.nmhu.edu and HU Mobile. These reports serve to inform students and advisers of a student’s progress so any problems in class performance can be addressed. If discrepancies occur at this time in the student’s schedule of classes, the student should proceed immediately to the Office of the Registrar to correct the schedule. Midterm grades do not appear on transcripts and are not kept as a permanent record.

Academic Integrity
New Mexico Highlands University is an academic community and, as such, is dedicated to the principles of truth and academic honesty. When a student commits academic dishonesty, the integrity and reputation of the university is undermined.

Academic dishonesty occurs when a student engages in any of the following activities on any graded exercise or examination:

Academic Dishonesty: Any behavior by a student that misrepresents or falsifies the student’s knowledge, skills, or ability including:

  1. Plagiarism: The process of using the ideas, data, written work or language of another person and claiming it as original or without specific or proper acknowledgement, including, but not limited to, copying another person’s paper, article, computer or other work and submitting it for an assignment; or copying someone else’s ideas without attribution; or failing to use quotation marks where appropriate; or copying another person’s idea or written work and claiming it as original without acknowledgment of the original author or creator.
  2. Cheating: A student’s use of, or attempt to use, unauthorized notes, texts, visual aids, electronic devices, assistance, copies of tests, material or study aids in examinations or other academic work to misrepresent his or her knowledge, skills, or abilities.
  3. Collusion: Cooperation between students in order to cheat or plagiarize.
  4. Facilitation: One student knowingly helps or attempts to help another student to violate any provision of this policy.
  5. Fabrication: A student submits contrived, altered or false information in any academic work product, exercise or examination.
  6. Multiple Submissions: A student submits, without prior permission from the instructor, identical work submitted to fulfill another academic requirement.
  7. Falsification of Records: A student alters a transcript or academic record, without authorization, or misrepresents information on a resume, either before or after enrolling as a student in the University, to unfairly improve his or her grades or rank or those of another student.

At Highlands University, academically dishonest students are subject to a number of punitive measures by instructors or the university. These punitive measures must be supported by documentation and evidence. Students found to practice academic dishonesty are subject to expulsion from Highlands University. Accusations of academic dishonesty may be appealed through the Office of Academic Affairs. Further guidance on academic dishonesty is available in the student and faculty handbooks: https://its.nmhu.edu/IntranetUploads/003424-StudentAcad-821201542952.pdf

Class Attendance
Persons whose names do not appear on the class list or roster are not registered for the course. Fundamentally, a person who is not registered has no relationship with New Mexico Highlands University and is not entitled to any services including instruction, testing, evaluation, disability services, or submission of a grade.

Professors may not permit students to attend classes without being registered. Students whose names do not appear on class rosters are to contact the Office of the Registrar to resolve the matter. Students can check online for the status of their class registration or enrollment.

Students are expected to attend all class meetings. Those who are absent because of circumstances beyond their control may be required to make up work missed during the period of absence. Excessive absences can adversely affect a student’s grade or result in an F. The attendance policy should be available on the course syllabus or in writing from the professor.

If a student’s conduct in class interferes with others, is disruptive of teaching, or is contrary to the established class practices, the instructor may ask the student to leave the class.

Scheduled Class Meetings
No change in the scheduled class days and hours may be made without the approval of the chief academic officer and the registrar, even though all students in the class concur in the change. Any temporary departure from the schedule is to be prearranged through the chief academic officer.

Room changes may be made by instructors only through the registrar and school/college dean. Instructors are not to change rooms without this approval. Classes are not to be transferred to private facilities. Students are not to register for classes that are scheduled to meet in overlapping times or days.

Final Examinations
The schedule of final examinations is listed in the online schedule of classes for each term. The exam schedule is also noted on the university’s website: www.nmhu.edu. The final examination period for each class is a part of the semester’s instructional time and is to be so used by the instructor of the course.

Any departures from the scheduled time or day for a final examination must be approved in advance by the chief academic officer. Faculty members are not to adjust the schedule on their own initiative, even though all of the students in the class concur in the change. If a student would experience a great personal hardship through attendance at a regularly scheduled final examination, the instructor of the course may agree to give an “incomplete” or to give an individual early examination. If a student fails to take a final examination, the instructor will decide whether the grade for the course will be an F or an incomplete. Each case should be decided on its merit. Circumstances beyond the student’s control should result in the “I” grade.

Independent Study, Independent Research, and Directed Study
Independent study and independent research courses are for individual work by a student under supervision of a faculty member on a topic agreed upon between them. A form describing each independent study course is approved by the academic dean in which the course is offered and the Dean of Graduate Studies, and submitted to the Office of the Registrar at the time of registration. The university offers graduate independent study and research courses under the numbers 5900, 5920, 6900, and 6920. These are variable-credit courses offering students and faculty supervisors a choice in the extent of the project and the corresponding amount of time to be spent and academic credit to be earned.

Policies on graduate independent study/research are stated in the Graduate Policies in the Graduate Student Handbook https://www.nmhu.edu/graduatehandbook and within the individual academic degree requirements section of this catalog.

Directed Study Classes
Directed study courses are designed for an individual or a small group of students who need a particular course to complete their program of study and are under the direction of a faculty member. The faculty member’s permission is required at the time of registration for the course. The directed study form is to be approved by the academic and graduate deans and submitted to the Registrar’s Office at the time of registration.

The content of the course and credits awarded may be that of a regularly offered course with the exception of core curriculum courses. Special circumstances under which these courses may be offered are:

  • The student(s) needs the class to graduate before the next time the regular course is to be scheduled; and, a course substitution is not feasible.
  • Directed study courses are offered under the numbers 5930, and 6930. The title of the directed study must be identified on the form consistent with the course number and title that it will substitute for such as SPED 5930 Classroom Management in Special Education. The course syllabus must be attached to the directed study form.

Practicum, Internship, and Field Project Courses
These titles are used for courses that students undertake with the joint supervision of a work-supervisor and a university faculty member, either at an on- or off-campus site. Often, they are offered with a variable-credit option allowing students a choice in the extent of the work and thus in the amount of academic credit to be earned.

Registration in these courses requires permission of the faculty member who will serve as faculty course supervisor.

Testing Out of Classes by Special Examination
The following regulations apply to the testing-out procedure at the university. Permission to undertake the special examination is requested on a form available in the Office of the Registrar directly to the academic department of the course being requested to test out. The request must be approved, and the form must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar before the special examination can be administered.

Applicants for special examination must meet the conditions stated in A and B below:

Section A: A student is eligible to apply for special examination to test out of a class offered at the university if he or she meets one of the following conditions:

  1. A course has been taken with similar content, but credit has not been received for reasons other than failure.
  2. There has been private tutoring, such as private instruction in music.
  3. The student has had successful work experience involving extensive preparation in the field
  4. The student has produced a work of recognized merit or presents other evidence of mastery in the field.

Section B: A student eligible under the above requirement must also meet all of the following conditions:

  1. Has been a resident student at this university for at least one semester.
  2. Has at least a 3.0 grade point average in the field and at least a 2.0 grade point average in all previous university work.
  3. Limits the total number of requests for special examination to 6 credits. (Exceptions to this limit must be approved by dean of graduate studies.)
  4. Obtains approval of the course instructor, the dean of the college/school in which the course is offered, and the dean of graduate studies.

Pay a fee of $40 per credit hour for each special examination. Payment must be made prior to administration of the test.

Examination questions and the completed examination paper are to be filed in the Office of the Registrar.

Student Records (Access to and Confidentiality)
Under the Family Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA), New Mexico Highlands University students have the following rights in regards to their educational records:

The right to inspect and review their education records within a reasonable time, not to exceed 45 days, upon making an official request and obtaining an appointment to do so.

The student may challenge inaccuracies or misleading statements contained in his or her educational records. Challenges must be made in writing and forwarded to the Registrar.

The right to consent to disclosure of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes exceptions without consent. Exceptions are a school official with a legitimate educational interest, compliance with judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena, officials for audit or evaluation purposes, in an emergency involving the health or safety of a student or other person and directory information. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the University to comply with the requirements of FERPA. Complaints may be forwarded to:

Family Policy Compliance Office
U.S. Department of Education
400 Maryland Ave, SW
Washington, DC 20202-5920
800-USA-LEARN (800-872-5327)

Directory Information
Directory information at New Mexico Highlands is student’s name, address, email address, telephone listing, field of study, photograph, date and place of birth, major field of study, grade level, enrollment status, dates of attendance, participation in officially recognized activities, and sports; weight and height of members of athletic teams; degrees, honors, and awards received; and the most recent educational agency or institution attended. Written requests from student to have directory information withheld must be forwarded to the Office of the Registrar by the last day of registration per semester and will be maintained for the remainder of the academic year or until revoked by the student in writing. In accordance with 14-3-15.1NMSA, New Mexico Highlands University does not release directory information for commercial or solicitation purposes. For more information, please contact the Office of the Registrar at 505-454-3455 or Registrar@nmhu.edu.

Change of Name or Address
Students who need to process a change of name for their academic records must bring appropriate documentation (at least two types of identification showing the new name) to the Office of the Registrar. Examples of such documentation include: marriage certificate, birth certificate, and court order for legal name change, with a copy of state-issued ID card or driver’s license and or Social Security card with change. Name changes must accompany a written request for the change and will be processed only for currently enrolled students. Change of address forms are available in the Office of the Registrar. For more information, contact the Office of the Registrar at 505-454-3455 or Registrar@nmhu.edu.

Transcripts
New Mexico Highlands University has appointed Credentials Inc. as our agent for printing and mailing academic transcript documents via the credentials eRoboMail service.  Order Official Transcripts Online by logging into self-service banner using your user name and password.  To request transcripts if attendance was prior to 1990, please click on the following link and follow the instructions:  http://www.nmhu.edu/office-of-the-registrar/transcripts/.

Students may check the online order of transcripts by clicking on the following link: https://www.credentials-inc.com/cgi-bin/rechkcgi.pgm?TPORDER902690

Transcript Holds
Transcripts (official or unofficial) will not be released to the student or to any other person or institution until all the student’s outstanding financial obligations to the university have been paid or until satisfactory payment arrangements have been made. These obligations include, but are not limited to, outstanding default student loans, institutional tuition and fees, and/or other charges. All financial arrangements are conducted in the Business Office, not the Office of the Registrar.

Graduate Transfer of Credit
A graduate student may transfer from another accredited institution up to 25% of their NMHU graduate program courses provided they meet the guidelines for transferring credits and approval is obtained from the graduate program and the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Admission to a NMHU certificate program does not guarantee admission to a related degree program, but if a certificate student is admitted to a degree program, all credits from the certificate may be counted toward the graduate degree, subject to the approval of graduate program faculty in the field of study. The terminal date associated with the degree will be determined using the date of the first certificate class as the initial date of enrollment for the degree. Students should contact the Graduate Coordinator or Department Chair to determine whether credits earned as part of a certificate program satisfy degree requirement of any particular degree.

The Graduate Transfer of Credit form is accessible in NMHU Online Documents, and must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar with appropriate signatures.

The transferred course:

  • Must have been completed with a grade of B or better,
  • must not exceed the individual graduate program’s time limit for currency (see also Time Limitations)
  • may not have been used for another degree,
  • must have been acceptable for a graduate degree or certificate at the institution where it was completed

Note, however, that:

  • A course description and syllabus from the institution at which the class was completed, or will be taken, must be attached to the Graduate Transfer of Credit form. This is needed to determine if the class is a suitable substitution for a course listed in the student’s Program of Study.
  • If it is not clear that the course is acceptable, an official statement may be required from the institution where the class was completed, verifying that the course was suitable for a graduate program there.

All of the following conditions must be met:

  • Student has been a matriculated student at NMHU for at least one semester,
  • Has at least at 3.0 grade point average in the field and at least at 2.0 grade point average in all previous university work,
  • Limits requests for special examination to a total of 6 credits,
  • The Dean of Graduate Studies must approve any exceptions to this limit

The approved Petition to Test-out form must be attached to the examination questions and the completed examination, which then must be sent to the Office of the Registrar (see also Time Limitations).

Please review the graduate handbook for other required documentation and requirements.

Military Credit

The university grants credit for military education or service schools on the recommendation of the American Council on Education’s Publication Guide to Evaluation of Educational Experience in the Armed Services. A DD214, DD295, or official military transcript form is required to consider credit for military service. Veterans must request their transcripts online by registering for a Joint Services Transcript (JST) account at https://jst.doded.mil/smart/registration.do

Academic Information for Graduate Degrees

Graduate Degree Requirements

Academic Advising
Graduate students are assigned to a faculty adviser within their area of study. The faculty adviser will help the student complete a program of study (POS) to satisfy the specific course requirements within their area. The courses listed must satisfy the course requirements prescribed in the catalog of record. The academic adviser will provide guidance in completing the POS. To be official and binding, the POS must receive final approval from the Dean of Graduate Studies. Only students admitted in regular graduate status are eligible to submit a POS. The POS must be filed at the end of the second semester in regular status. The approved POS will be submitted to the Office of the Registrar. For more information refer to the Graduate Handbook: https://www.nmhu.edu/graduatehandbook/

Academic Dismissal
Academic dismissal is issued to students who do not meet the required GPA after being on academic probation for two consecutive semesters. Dismissals will be for one calendar year from the posting of semester grades. The Office of Graduate Studies will notify students of their academic dismissal immediately after semester grades are posted. To appeal one or more grades, the student must complete a Grade Appeal Form available in the Office of Academic Affairs and the Office of Graduate Studies.

Students may also appeal the dismissal itself to the Academic Affairs Graduate Subcommittee within 30 days of the beginning of the semester when the dismissal begins. If the appeal is approved, the dismissal may be waived or shortened to one semester.

During the period of dismissal, students may not register for classes, live in student housing or participate in student activities at Highlands University. No credit will be granted for courses taken at other institutions while under dismissal at Highlands University. After a dismissal, a student must petition for readmission in the Office of Graduate Studies.

Students suspended or dismissed from another institution are not eligible to enroll at New Mexico Highlands University until they have served the suspension or dismissal period of that institution.

Approved Program of Study
The faculty adviser will help the student complete a program of study (POS) to satisfy the specific course requirements within their area. The courses listed must satisfy the course requirements prescribed in the catalog of record. To be official and binding, the POS must receive final approval from the Dean of Graduate Studies. Only students admitted in regular graduate status are eligible to submit a POS. The POS must be filed at the end of the second semester in regular status. The approved POS will be submitted to the Office of the Registrar.  A student will not be considered a candidate for a degree until the program of study has been submitted and formally approved. The program of study, signed by the study, the adviser, the appropriate graduate program coordinator and graduate dean, and must include the following:

  • A total of at least 32 semester credits of 5000- or 6000-level courses of which at least 15 credits are at the 6000 level. None of the coursework may have been used for another degree, except for dual master’s programs, nor may a 5000-level course be used for credit if the 400-level counterpart has been used for a bachelor’s degree. A course already taken may not be retaken for credit merely because the course number, title, level, instructor, textbook, or offering has changed. A course already taken may not be repeated as independent study.
  • No more than one quarter of the total credits in the student’s approved graduate program may be in thesis or field project, independent research, independent study, directed study, or any combination thereof.
  • Failure to file a proposed program of study during the first term may result in a delay of registration in the next term.

The following policies apply to transfer, workshop, and institute credits:

  • A student may transfer up to six semester credits from another accredited institution, provided that the hours were earned at the institution with B or higher grades, they were not used for another degree, were completed within the specified time limitations, and were earned in courses acceptable for a graduate degree at the institution where they were earned.
  • Acceptability of transfer credits will be determined by the appropriate discipline, the concerned dean, and the Provost. The request for transfer of credit must be submitted on a special application provided for this purpose (in addition to listing the hours on the program of study). These transfer credits will not be used in computing grade point averages to determine probation or eligibility for assistant ships and graduation.
  • The final eight semester credits (not including independent study or research) will be in courses offered in residence by Highlands University.
  • No workshops or institute credits may be used toward a master’s degree. (They may be used for teacher licensure or endorsements.)

Upon approval of the program of study, the graduate student will be admitted to candidacy. Notification of approval will be sent to the student along with a list of courses and requirements to be completed before the degree can be awarded. These requirements may be altered with the formal approval of the student, the adviser, the concerned dean, and the Provost.

Time Limitations
All work applied to a graduate degree must be completed within seven calendar years from the end of the semester in which the program was begun. Work accepted for transfer from other institutions must have been completed within this same time period.

Students who, for reasons beyond their control, are unable to complete the work within the prescribed time may petition the Academic Affairs Committee for an extension of one year, giving good, and valid reasons for the delay. The discipline and the dean concerned should be requested to make a recommendation as to the correctness of the course content in questions. If approved, the student will be required to update the work by assigned readings and possibly by the preparation of the paper for each outdated course.

Any additional extension of time will require a testing-out examination on all outdated work as stated in the Testing Out of Classes by Special Examination section of this catalog or retaking the outdated classes.

If a student, whose coursework exceeds six years, remains continuously enrolled for one hour of thesis, field project, or designated exit document class, will not be required to pay the test-out fee to establish currency.

The process of testing for currency will be the same as that for courses that are older than seven years, but less than six years old. If the student breaks the cycle of enrollment, then the fee requirement to test current will become effective immediately.

If all coursework, except for thesis, field project, etc., is older than six years old, the program may develop a comprehensive examination instead of a per-course exam to test the student. The fee for this examination will not exceed $1,200.

Graduate Oral Examination
The master’s degree will be awarded at the first commencement following the satisfactory completion of an approved program of study and an oral comprehensive examination.

The graduate program coordinator/department chair, the college/school dean, dean of graduate studies, and the Office of the Registrar must grant clearance to take the oral examination. Examinations conducted without these approvals are null and void, and arrangements to retake the test(s) must be made.

To be acceptable, a comprehensive oral examination must be conducted by a committee of at least three members, two of whom must represent the field of the student’s program or concentration area. The committee must be chaired by a member of the graduate faculty, and a third member may be a person with expertise in the student’s field but does not need to be a member of the faculty. A fourth (optional) member may also be a voting member. The comprehensive exam should consist of the following: 1) test the candidate’s ability to integrate and represent knowledge from a broad field of study: 2) include a defense of the thesis, filed project, or publishable papers; and 3) be of sufficient duration to permit coverage of the field in substantial depth.

  • The completed request for Oral Examination Form is due in the Office of the Registrar two weeks prior to the scheduled date.
  • The committee members must be listed as specified in the Exit Document Intent Form. The committee must consist of at least three members, two of whom must represent the field of the student’s program or concentration area.
  • All coursework must be completed or be in the process of completion during the semester when the oral examination is given.
  • For students who have not completed the required coursework, the oral exam may not take place before midterm or when school is not in session unless formal approval is given.
  • All exams must be conducted on campus unless special approval has been obtained.
  • Changes to committee must receive approval by the deal of graduate studies before the exam may be conducted. If a member of the committee is not present at the oral examination, as required, the oral examination may not proceed.  However, if the absence is because of unavoidable circumstances, another faculty member from the student’s discipline may substitute for the absent committee member.  It is the student’s responsibility to get a commitment from faculty members who will serve on the graduate advisory committee.  It is the faculty member’s responsibility to be present at the oral examination as agreed upon.

Please review the graduate handbook and respective program handbook for further information.

Thesis, Field Project, and Professional Paper
The thesis, field project, or professional paper is to be presented in proper form to the appropriate office before the end of the semester in which the degree is to be awarded. A $13 fee is charged for the library binding. (See the Thesis Information Sheet available at the library or at the Office of Graduate Studies.)

A committee of at least three members must read and approve the thesis, field project, or professional paper before it will be accepted. The committee is the same as the oral examination committee.

The thesis, field project, or professional paper is to be defended in the oral examination. A draft of the paper(s) must be in the hands of the committee members at least one week before the oral examination. The student must acquire the signature of the Provost before submitting the thesis or publishable papers to the library. The field project must acquire the signature of the appropriate dean. The field project or professional paper must meet the same internal review expected of thesis.

The thesis, field project, or professional paper is to be a report of an independent and original investigation done under the supervision of a member of the graduate faculty with the advice and cooperation of the committee members and other graduate faculty. It is expected that editorial advice will be given to the student by the graduate faculty supervisor and committee member and that the student will rewrite the paper until it is worthy of being a part of the permanent library collection.

The usual letter grades are not given for thesis (6990) or field project (6970). A completed thesis or field project will receive either an S (satisfactory) or an F (fail). Students who do not complete a thesis or field project during the semester for which they register will be given the grade of PR (progress) or NP (no progress). PR grades will be changed to S upon successful completion of the thesis or field project.

Until the program is completed, students are to enroll for at least one credit hour of thesis, field project, or designated course in each semester in which work on the program is performed.

A professional paper must conform to the manuscript style and format dictated by the appropriate discipline. The content of the paper will be evaluated by the chair and other members of the student’s oral examination committee. The student will have met the professional paper option upon completion of the internal review process. Binding acceptance of the papers may occur after approval by the dean and the Provost.

At the end of the five-year limitation allowed by university policy for completion of a master’s degree, the student’s graduate program, including thesis or field project work, will be automatically terminated unless an extension has been approved by the Academic Affairs Committee.

General Graduation Policies

Graduation
Students must apply for and submit their application for graduation through the Office of the Registrar a semester prior to the anticipated graduation date (example, if planning on graduating in Spring, apply in Fall). A one-time, nonrefundable graduation fee is charged for each degree. Graduation is subject to completion of all program requirements and submission of all required documentation. Students are reminded of the importance of working with their academic adviser to ensure all program and graduation requirements have been met prior to submitting a final degree check. For more information, contact the Office of the Registrar at 505-454-3438 or registrar@nmhu.edu.

Graduate Policies and Degree Requirements
Graduate programs are administered by the Office of Graduate Studies under the direction of the graduate dean. Graduate students will find program requirements for each graduate under the appropriate college/school listings in this catalog. Considerations from those sections and from the university’s general academic regulations, together with these regulations and requirements, should be followed carefully. Graduate courses are offered in some disciplines that do not offer a degree, but may be used for certifications requirements or simply to increase knowledge in a particular subject. It is the responsibility of each student to know and to meet the various deadlines and requirements.

Graduation Residency Requirement
To be eligible for graduation under any curriculum or with any degree, students must be in residence on campus for one full academic year (at least 30 semester credits), including the final semester (at least 15 credits). “In residence” means enrolled in courses by any delivery method through Highlands University.

Commencement
New Mexico Highlands University holds commencement ceremonies each May. Students completing their program at the Las Vegas campus will participate with the commencement at main campus. Student completing their program at the Albuquerque or Rio Rancho Centers will participate with the commencement through the Rio Rancho Center. Students completing their program at the Farmington Center will participate in a joint commencement with San Juan Community College. Students completing their program at the Santa Fe Center have the choice of participating in either the Las Vegas campus or Rio Rancho Center commencement. Social Work students taking classes in Roswell may take part in the Rio Rancho/ABQ commencement or in a joint commencement with Eastern New Mexico University-Roswell. To participate in the commencement ceremony, a student must be eligible to complete all degree requirements at the end of the spring semester or within 9 credits for the summer term. To be included in the Commencement program, students need to have completed their final degree check and applied for graduation during the fall semester prior to their final semester.

Posting of the Degree
The degree earned will be recorded on the student’s transcript at the end of the semester when all degree requirements have been completed, and all necessary documents have been submitted to the Office of the Registrar. Diplomas are mailed to the address listed on the degree application as degrees are awarded.

Graduate Degree Programs
Graduate degrees offered at the university are the Master of Arts, Master of Science, Master of Social Work, and Master of Business Administration.

Performance of Graduate Students, Probation/Suspension
Graduate students must maintain high quality in their coursework. Students must have a grade point average of at least 3.0 in the graduate courses listed on the program of study to receive a master’s degree. Failure to maintain a satisfactory average will result in probation or suspension. No course in which a grade below C is earned will be given graduate credit, but it will be counted in determining the grade point average.

Any student whose grade point average in graduate work falls below 3.0 in any semester will be placed on academic probation. Other conditions for probation may be established. Any student whose cumulative grade point average falls below 2.4 may be suspended. A student on graduate academic probation for two consecutive semesters may be suspended. Other conditions for suspension may be established. After one year, suspended graduate students may apply to the Academic Affairs Committee for readmission.

Financial Aid and Scholarships
Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships
Felix Martinez Building, Suite 240
505-454-3318 or toll-free 800-379-4038
Email: financialaid@nmhu.edu

As part of our mission, New Mexico Highlands University is committed to ensuring that no student will be denied the opportunity for a postsecondary education because of limited resources. To meet this goal, the New Mexico Highlands University Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships offers a broad spectrum of academic merit scholarships, grants, work-study jobs, and loans to supplement the resources of eligible students who attend Highlands University. We provide New Mexico Highlands University students with the timely delivery of financial assistance while maintaining accountability and proper stewardship of the public, institutional, and private funds with which it is entrusted. We are committed to providing courteous service to support the academic mission and goals of the University and its students. We will respond to student inquiries within a 24-hour period.

Financial aid at New Mexico Highlands University is divided into three categories:

  • Federal aid
  • Self-help aid (employment and loans)
  • Scholarships (merit and need based)

The Financial Aid Package
The Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships awards financial aid according to individual need and eligibility criteria. If a student is a dependent, parents are expected to contribute toward educational costs according to their financial ability. In addition, students are expected to contribute from their own assets and earnings, including borrowing against future income. Financial need is the difference between the cost of attendance at New Mexico Highlands University (including living expenses) and the expected family contribution (EFC). The aid package cannot exceed financial need or cost of attendance.

To apply for financial aid:
Complete all sections of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) online at https://fafsa.ed.gov/.

The New Mexico Highlands University school code is 002653. If transferring into New Mexico Highlands University during the current academic year, the applicant will also need to access the FAFSA online at https://fafsa.ed.gov/ and add NMHU (002653) to the list of schools. It is the applicant’s responsibility to ensure that the financial aid file is complete. The Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships cannot make a financial aid award if a file is incomplete or if a student is not admitted into a degree-seeking program or eligible Title IV program. Web access is available to students 24 hours a day, seven days a week at www.nmhu.edu; click on “MY NMHU” and enter secure area to obtain financial aid status. Once a student’s processed FAFSA is received, the Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships will determine if and for how much financial aid an applicant is eligible. The aid awarded is based on the cost of attending Highlands University, including tuition and fees, room and board, books and supplies, transportation, and personal expenses. See a financial aid adviser for more information. To qualify for financial aid at Highlands University, an applicant must:

  • Demonstrate financial need as determined through a processed FAFSA.
  • Be a U.S. citizen or an eligible noncitizen.
  • Maintain satisfactory academic progress (see standards below).
  • Be enrolled in a regular degree program (Title IV eligible) at Highlands University.
  • Be enrolled at least half time (six credit hours) for all aid programs (with the exception of federal Pell Grant, in certain situations).
  • Not be in default on a federal student loan or owe a repayment on a federal grant.

Students may use their financial aid awards to defer tuition at the New Mexico Highlands University Business Office/ Student Accounts once classes are charged to their account and before the awards are disbursed. A student’s award is subject to change if the student becomes ineligible as a result of over-award or failure to maintain academic progress. Students are required to notify the financial aid office if they are receiving aid from ANY other source.

Verification Policy
A student may be required to verify the accuracy of his or her FAFSA. All students who are selected by the Department of Education’s central processing servicer for verification must submit the appropriate documents requested by the Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships before the application for aid can be processed. 

Satisfactory Academic Progress
Federal Title IV program regulations require participating institutions to develop procedures to monitor a student’s progress toward completion of their program of study. The following is a summary of the criteria used by the Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships to monitor progress:

GPA Requirement for Graduate Students
Graduate Students must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 per semester to remain eligible. They also are allowed a one-time warning semester if they do not meet the requirements.

Pace of Progression (Formerly Completion Rate) for Undergraduate and Graduate Students
To determine the pace of progression, divide the hours completed by hours attempted. Less than the percentage indicated below results in financial aid ineligibility.

All undergraduate and graduate students must complete 67% of the attempted credit hours for their particular program.

Note: Hours attempted includes all credit hours attempted and completed as well as unsatisfactory grades for example: F, W, U, I, NG, NP, and R. 

Maximum Time Frame for Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Once the maximum hours of 150% of a program have been reached, the result is financial aid ineligibility or suspension. Students who have reached 125 percent of their degree requirement will be placed on a review status. They will receive an email informing them they are within 30 credit hours of reaching MTF. Students who reach 150 percent of their degree requirement will no longer be eligible and be suspended. Students may appeal if they feel they have extenuating circumstances that warrant review.

Notification and Appeal Process
Students who fall below the required 2.0 GPA or credit hours, and exceed maximum time frame, will be notified by email at the end of the semester. When notified of financial aid suspension, the student may file a written appeal with the Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships. A link to the Satisfactory Academic Progress Appeal form is provided in the email and also is available on our website: http://its.nmhu.edu/www/onlinedocs/index.html.

The appeal committee will review the appeal documents and a decision will be made to either allow the student to be placed on an academic plan or deny the request. The student may be put on an academic plan for up to five semesters which will allow the student to demonstrate progress and meet the minimum standards. If denied, a student who continues coursework at New Mexico Highlands University is personally responsible for tuition and fee charges with no assistance from federal aid programs and must meet the minimum standards as established in the Satisfactory Academic Progress Standards.

Enrollment Requirements for Financial Aid
Graduate students must be enrolled for a minimum of six credits each semester to be eligible for financial aid.

The summer course load requirements for financial aid is a minimum of six credits hours. Note: Audit and some repeat courses are not eligible for financial aid.

To avoid loss of financial aid, please refer to the section on Tuition, Fees and Financial Policies in this catalog before dropping or withdrawing from classes or contact the Office of Financial Aid at 505-454-3318 or via email at financialaid@nmhu.edu for additional questions. 

Financial Aid Return of Title IV Funds for Official/Unofficial Withdrawals
The federal return of Title IV policy will be used to calculate the portion of federal financial aid a student is ineligible for and must repay/return to the Department of Education should the student withdraw completely from school (officially or unofficially). This applies to students receiving Federal Direct Stafford Unsubsidized Loan; Federal Direct Stafford Subsidized Loan; Graduate PLUS loan; Federal Pell Grant; Federal SEOG; Federal TEACH Grant and/or other Title IV program assistance. For more information, contact the Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships at 505- 454-3318 or 800-379-4038.

New Mexico Highlands University Undergraduate Scholarship Programs
The Highlands University scholarship program was established to recognize and reward outstanding achievements by graduate students. A grade point average of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 scale is required to compete for our academic-based scholarship Graduate Presidential scholarship. Full-time status of 9 credit hours is required. To obtain information, contact the Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships or log on to http://www.nmhu.edu/financial-aid/scholarships/.

Scholarship Cancellation and Reinstatement
The time period for which a scholarship is in effect is fixed. If the scholarship is cancelled due to academic ineligibility, the original specified time period is not extended. Students who are placed on suspension may appeal for consideration for renewal of the scholarship. A scholarship appeal form must be submitted to the Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships after receiving the suspension letter or email.

Assistance Programs and Benefits
Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) www.bia.gov/

Each year, the BIA provides grants to assist eligible Native American students in meeting their education costs. The amounts of the grants vary according to the student’s financial need. The funds are available through the student’s BIA area office or tribal scholarship office. Check with the tribal agency to ascertain program requirements and deadlines for application.

Enrollment Certifications for Loan Deferments
www.nmhu.edu/office-of-the-Registrar/

Students are usually required to process an enrollment certification to defer payments on an outstanding student loan. The Office of the Registrar certifies enrollment verification forms after classes begin. For more information, contact the Office of the Registrar, 505-454-3233.

American Indian Residency
All enrolled out-of-state members of an American Indian nation, tribe and/or pueblo shall be eligible for in-state tuition rates. Please submit a copy of your Certificate of Indian Blood (CIB) to Admissions via email at admissions@nmhu.edu. For specific questions, please contact the Admissions Office at 505-454-3394 or admissions@nmhu.edu.

Native American students from all 22 New Mexico tribes have access to 69 full-tuition scholarships per year are part of a Memorandum of Understanding between Highlands and New Mexico’s tribal leaders that was celebrated Sept. 27. The MOU continues through 2020. 

Nonresident Tuition Waiver for Colorado Students
www.nmhu.edu/office-of-the-Registrar/

A reciprocity agreement between Colorado and New Mexico allows New Mexico Highlands University to grant a waiver of the nonresident portion of tuition charges to a limited number of students from Colorado. Each student requesting such a waiver must complete an application each semester. The application must be submitted no later than the second Friday of the semester and can be obtained from the Office of the Registrar. The Office of the Registrar’s reviews the applications and submits them to the Financial Aid Office for processing.

Nonresident Tuition Waiver for Student Athletes
www.nmhu.edu/office-of-the-Registrar/

Senate Bill 81 authorizes resident tuition status for athletic scholarship recipients. To be eligible, the student must be a recruited athlete. The student must also receive an athletic scholarship through the Athletic Department. For more information, contact the New Mexico Highlands University Department of Athletics, 505-454-3368. 

Online National Council for State Authorization Reciprocity Agreements NC-SARA
http://nc-sara.org

The State Authorization Reciprocity Agreement is a voluntary agreement among its member states and U.S. territories that establishes comparable national standards for interstate offering of postsecondary distance-education courses and programs. It is intended to make it easier for students to take online courses offered by postsecondary institutions based in another state.

The State Authorization Reciprocity Agreement (SARA) establishes a state-level reciprocity process that will support the nation in its efforts to increase the educational attainment of its people by making state authorization:

  • more efficient, effective, and uniform in regard to necessary and reasonable standards of practice that could span states;
  • more effective in dealing with quality and integrity issues that have arisen in some online/ distance education offerings; and
  • less costly for states and institutions and, thereby, the students they serve.

Veterans Administration Educational Benefits
www.nmhu.edu/office-of-the-Registrar/

Several programs are available for veterans pursuing a postsecondary education. Academic programs are approved by the State Approving Agency and are approved for educational benefits by the Department of Veteran Affairs. Contact the Office of the Registrar for details, 505-454-3424.

Student veterans can compare benefits or apply for the GI Bill at www.gbill.va.gov. University staff are not allowed to advise students on their benefits. Please note the following conditions:

  • VA only pays for classes that are part of your core, major or minor. Courses previously completed with a passing grade, audit or optional course cannot be certified;
  • VA will pay for a course from the day the course begins to the day the course ends. Courses taken with different beginning and ending dates will be adjusted for payment by the VA;
  • Students must notify the VA Certifying Official if a course is dropped or withdrawn, and provide a last day of attendance. This date is reported to the VA and may cause an overpayment.

VA Graduate training time:

16 weeks:
9 hrs   Full time
6 hrs   ¾ time
5 hrs   ½ time
3 hrs   ¼ time

8 Weeks:
5 hrs   Full time
4 hrs   ¾ time
3 hrs   ½ time 

6 Weeks:
4 hrs   Full time
3 hrs   ¾ time
2 hrs   ½ time
1 hr     ¼ time

4 Weeks:
3 hrs   Full time
2 hrs   ¾ time
1 hr     ½ time

Vocational Rehabilitation
www.dvr.state.nm.us/

Through the New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, the state and federal governments offer tuition assistance to students with disabilities. Other assistance also may be given to those students with disabilities who are financially unable to provide services themselves. Students wishing to apply for this assistance should contact the New Mexico Vocational Rehabilitation Office, 505-425-9365.

Western Regional Graduate Program (WRGP)
https://www.wiche.edu/tuition-savings/wrgp/

New Mexico Highlands University participates in the Western Regional Graduate Program (WRGP), which allows students from participating states to attend Highlands at 150 percent of in-state tuition. The application for the WRGP program must be submitted no later than the third Friday of the semester to the Office of the Registrar. The Registrar’s Office reviews the applications and submits them to the Financial Aid Office for processing. For a list of participating schools in Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming see https://www.wiche.edu/tuition-savings/wrgp/.

Workforce Investment Act
www.dws.state.nm.us/Portals/0/DM/Partners/

WIA_Annual_Report_2012_Revised.pdf The New Mexico Department of Labor (NM Workforce Connection), the state and federal governments offer assistance with tuition, books, supplies, transportation, and childcare for those who qualify. For more information and application process, contact the New Mexico Department of Labor, 505-425-6451.

Study Abroad
www.nmhu.edu/international-students/

The International Education Center assists students in applying for study-abroad programs sponsored by Highlands University, the New Mexico Public Universities Consortium, and other cooperating institutions. Tuition, Fees and Financial Policies University students must pay tuition and other fees or make appropriate payment arrangements.

Tuition, Fees, and Financial Policies
Tuition and Fee rates may increase upon approval by the Board of Regents. These figures are provided to help students plan. Tuition and fee rates are effective beginning in the summer semester and proceed to fall and spring. All rates are subject to change. The following rates are the 2020-2021 tuition and fee rates, tuition and fee information may be viewed under the Tuition and Fee section on the NMHU website at: http://www.nmhu.edu/office-of-the-registrar/tuition-and-fees/

Students who enroll in classes at NMHU must make a financial commitment to pay the tuition and fees associated with enrollment. University students can make satisfactory financial arrangements with the Student Accounts Receivable (SAR) department in the Business Office on or before the payment deadline, see Payment Plans section below. Payment deadlines are established by the SAR department and published with the schedule of classes.

Payments, Accounts, and Disbursements
Account balances must be paid according to the plans listed in the Payment Plans section.  Students with financial assistance should verify their award prior to the payment deadlines.  Tuition and Fees and other University charges such as Housing and Meal Plans can be paid in person at the Cashier’s Office, by mail, or through TouchNet; the University’s student online payment system.  Please click on the following link to be directed to the NMHU TouchNet site: http://www.nmhu.edu/campus-services/business-office/payment-plans/

Payments accepted in person include cash, checks, money orders, and cashier’s checks. Payments accepted by mail include checks, money orders, and cashier’s checks. Payments accepted online through TouchNet include debit and credit cards, checking and savings accounts, and wire transfers. Payments on accounts will be processed immediately when a payment is made at the Cashier’s Office. The student account is credited, and the payment amount is deducted from the balance at the time the transaction takes place. The same applies for payments made online through TouchNet. If a payment arrives by mail it is posted to the student account as quickly as possible unless the check requires research for proper receipting.

Your financial aid disbursements may be sent to your financial institution via direct deposit.  If you would like to enroll in this service, please complete and submit the enrollment form. Any The form and required documents may be submitted as follows:

  • scan and email to apdirectdeposit@nmhu.edu
  • in-person, delivered to the Business Office (Mass Communications Building) sent via US Mail to: NMHU Business Office, Box 9000, Las Vegas, NM  87701

E-statements are sent monthly to your NMHU Live student email. Logon to the website www.nmhu.edu, Student Login, to view the statements.

Payment Plans
Students must pay their account in full or make adequate financial arrangements if the student does not have financial aid or a third-party authorization.

The SAR department offers students the following payment options:

Fall & Spring Semester:
Two-payment plan option
Three-payment plan option
Four-payment plan option

Summer Semester:
Two-payment plan option
Three-payment plan option

A $25 non-refundable billing fee and account hold will be assessed to the student’s account if the balance is not paid in full by the last due date of the semester. 

For more information on payment options, contact the Student Accounts Receivable Help Team at 505-454-3444 or email sar@nmhu.edu

Third Party and Tuition Waivers
Students who qualify for deferred payment or whose tuition is paid by a third party outside agency, must submit authorizations to the SAR staff before the start of the semester. Please submit authorization to thirdpartybilling@nmhu.edu Students who register late must provide this information as soon as possible and no later than the closing period of registration.

Students utilizing employee tuition waivers or dependent tuition waivers must submit completed waivers to the Human Resource Department before the semesters Census date per University policy.

The SAR department will process all third party and tuition waiver payments after the last date to withdrawal with a refund.

Summary of Regulations for New Mexico Residency for Tuition Purposes
The Office of the Registrar does not determine the laws and rulings for determining residency, these are state laws that the Office of the Registrar simply administers. An individual must establish legal residency in New Mexico before he or she is entitled to pay in-state tuition rates.

A student’s initial residency status is determined at the time of admission, any changes to this status must be initiated by the student through the Office of the Registrar. A continuing student, classified as a non-resident, who has satisfied the requirements to establish residency may submit a Petition for In-State Residency Tuition Classification along with the required supporting documentation to the Office of the Registrar. Petitions must be filed on or before the census date of the effective semester.

To become a legal resident of New Mexico, four requirements must be met by the student. Each person must meet the requirements individually:

  • The 12-month consecutive presence requirement;
  • The financial independence requirement;
  • The written declaration of intent requirement;
  • The overt acts requirements.

Permanent residents must present their valid 10-year I-551 form and establish 12 consecutive months of being a New Mexico resident before applying for in-state residency. The person, his or her spouse and dependent children of a person who has moved to New Mexico and has obtained permanent full-time employment (sufficient documentation is required) shall not be required to complete the 12-month duration requirement. A person, his or her spouse, and dependents who move to New Mexico for retirement purposes and who provide appropriate evidence of formal retirement shall not be required to complete the 12-month duration requirement.

Other relevant factors may be considered along with those listed above.

  • A reciprocity agreement between Colorado and New Mexico allows New Mexico Highlands University to grant a waiver of the non-resident portion of tuition charges to a limited number of students from Colorado. Each student requesting such a waiver must complete the proper application and return it to the Office of the Registrar on or before census date of the effective semester. The Office of the Registrar reviews the applications and submits them to the Financial Aid Office for processing.
  • All enrolled out-of-state members of an American Indian nation, tribe and pueblo shall be eligible for in-state tuition rates.
  • A brochure explaining all requirements for establishing New Mexico residency and residency petitions is available from the Office of the Registrar. For more information, call 505-454-3233.

Withdrawal Policies and Tuition Refund Schedule
Students who withdrawal from the university with official approval may have all or part of their tuition and fees refunded according to the university refund schedule.

Refund of tuition and fees (except for special fees and course fees) is made in cases of timely, complete, and official withdrawal from the university. Please see refund schedule below:

8- to 11-week courses                                                     4- to 7-week courses

First day: 100%                                                                       First day: 100%
Second through 5th day: 90%                                                Second through 3rd day: 90%
6th through 10th day: 50%                                                    4th through 5th day: 50%
11th through 15th day: 25%                                                  6th through 7th day: 25%
After 15th day: no refunds                                                     After 7th day: no refunds

1- to 3-week courses

First day: 100%                                  Fourth day: 25%
Second day: 90%                                After fourth day: no refunds                                                Third day: 50%

For more information on the withdrawal schedule please see Withdrawal Information at: https://www.nmhu.edu/campus-services/business-office/withdrawal-information/

Please call us at (505) 454-3444 or e-mail sar@nmhu.edu if you have questions regarding withdrawal dates and course refund schedules. 

Housing Services 

Housing Rates
Housing rates may increase upon approval by the Board of Regents. These figures are provided to help students plan. Housing rates for the 2020-2021 academic year may be viewed at: http://www.nmhu.edu/highlands-university-housing/student-housing-rates/

Meal Plans
Meal plans may increase upon approval by the Board of Regents. These figures are provided to help students plan. Meal plans are required for students in residence halls. Information regarding the rates of the 2020-2021 meals can be viewed at:
http://www.nmhu.edu/highlands-university-housing/student-housing-rates/

All students residing in residence halls are required to purchase a meal plan. Plan descriptions are available in the link above. Meals are not available over the break periods.

Housing over semester breaks is limited and there is an additional charge.

Residence Hall Association fee of $40 is assessed each semester.

College of Arts and Sciences

Dr. Brandon Kempner, Dean
Douglas Hall, Room 136
bkempner@nmhu.edu
Phone: 505-454-3080
FAX: 505-454-3389

Mission of the College of Arts and Sciences
The College of Arts and Sciences at New Mexico Highlands University is home to graduate programs in English, philosophy, life sciences, physical sciences, computer sciences, mathematics, engineering, physics and social sciences. In addition to serving the needs of its majors and minors in these disciplines, the College offers courses in the core curriculum as part of the university’s mission to provide a well-rounded education for its students.

Arts and Sciences graduate programs showcase excellence in teaching, research, and public service. Embracing the vision of our strategic plan, we strive to be the flagship comprehensive university in New Mexico, serving students from all walks of life.

Graduate programs in the College of Arts and Sciences not only help students acquire knowledge, verbal and cognitive skills, but also to embrace the values and attitudes that form the basis of a liberal education. Our graduate programs also instill within students the ability and desire to think and work independently and creatively, to appreciate learning for its own sake, and to recognize the lifelong benefits of a commitment to truth and excellence.

The purpose of research in the college is to amend and extend the bases of knowledge and creative activities, to renew and enrich our teaching resources, to exemplify in our own work superlative scholarly habits that will provide a model to which our students may aspire, and to share our knowledge and the fruits of our labors with the scholarly community, our students, and the general public.

The college’s public service commitment signifies that in all our scholastic endeavors, we will remember that the purpose of our activities is to benefit the members of the regional, state and world communities. Furthermore, recognizing that its involvement extends beyond the confines of the university, our commitment is to confront the urgent problems presented by geographical, political, racial, and gender boundaries. The College works with an eye to the resolution of problems in today’s complex and changing world.

Departments

  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Computer & Mathematical Sciences
  • English
  • Exercise and Sport Sciences
  • Forestry
  • History and Political Science
  • Language and Culture
  • Natural Resources Management
  • Psychology
  • Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminal Justice
  • Visual and Performing Arts

Department of Biology

Dr. Jesus Rivas, Department Chair

Ivan Hilton Science Building, Room 324
Phone: 505-454-3292
FAX: 505-454-3103
E-mail: rivas@nmhu.edu

About
The Department of Biology values teaching and research as equal and essential components of the education of our students and seeks to integrate research with teaching at every possible opportunity in the curriculum. Housed in the Ivan Hilton Science Center, the facilities allow students to enjoy modern laboratories and instrumentation.

Graduate Program Faculty

Sarah Corey-Rivas, Ph.D.

Justine Garcia, Ph.D.

Eric Griffin, Ph.D.

Carol Linder, Ph.D.

Sebastian Medina, Ph.D.

Ben Nelson, DVM

Jesus Rivas, Ph.D.

Maureen Romine, Ph.D.

Mission of the Biology Program
The mission of the Biology Program is to provide students with a high-quality education that includes experience with research and field projects. The program provides a scientific and technical background that empowers students to successfully pursue science and technology careers or proceed to advanced graduate studies. Faculty strive to make each student’s educational experience challenging and rewarding.

The Biology Program prides itself on its ability to place students into bioscience careers. Data suggest that our graduates are highly successful in being admitted to and completing medical, dental, and veterinary schools and graduate programs nationwide. The department attributes this success to intensive biology laboratory and field experiences with cutting-edge technology and instructors committed to individual student progress. Facilities include laboratories in physiology, microbiology, molecular biology, plant biology, and a greenhouse, as well as nearby field sites for ecological research. A computer laboratory with bioinformatics software is available for classroom and student use. Graduate students in biology are taught the practical use of common scientific instrumentation they will encounter in their careers.

Mission of the Natural Sciences Master’s Program with a Concentration in Biology
The mission of the Master’s program in Biology is to provide graduate students with a high-quality science education that includes experience with research and field projects. We offer a Thesis Track MS Program centered on an individual research project guided by a graduate faculty adviser and advisory committee and a Non-Thesis Track MS Program. Our Master’s Programs provide a scientific and technical background that empowers students to successfully pursue science and technology careers, or proceed to advanced graduate studies.

Resources and Facilities
The Biology Department is situated in the Ivan Hilton Science Center. Our laboratory research is fully supported with modern and continuously updated facilities including molecular and cellular lab space and equipment, a teaching and research greenhouse, and organismal wet labs. Field research in evolution and ecology is comprehensively supported by a long-term research station at the Rio Mora National Wildlife Refuge and the surrounding ecosystems of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains and Great Plains. Our teaching labs are fully equipped for inquiry and research-based biology exploration.

MS in Natural Sciences

Master of Science in Natural Sciences (MS)

Concentration in Biology (thesis option)

Required Core Courses: 19 credit hours

BIOL 6000 Research Methods in Life Science (3)

BIOL 6200 Advanced Topic in Biology* (2/2)

*Repeated for credit with different subject matter for a total of four credit hours

BIOL 6500 Grad Seminar in Life Science* (1/1/1/1)

*Repeated four times for a total of four credit hours

BIOL 5590 Fundamental Principles of Laboratory Safety (1)

INDP 6920 Research Ethics and Integrity (1)

Choose at least two of the following:

BIOL 6100 Environmental Physiology (3)

BIOL 6400 Advanced Molecular and Cell Biology (3)

BIOL 6300 Advanced Microbiology (3)

BIOL 6890 Advanced Ecology (3)

Thesis Option:

BIOL 6990 Thesis (1-7)

Elective Courses:

Choose from the following courses in consultation with your adviser. Other 5000- and 6000-level courses offered in chemistry, forestry, geology, psychology, or other appropriate disciplines may be substituted for electives listed below with the approval of your biology adviser.

Elective Courses, Thesis Option: 12 hours

Electives:

BIOL 5050 Bacterial Physiology (3)

BIOL 5150 Biotechnology (4)

BIOL 5230 Molecular & Cell Biology (4)

BIOL 5240 Molecular & Cell Biology Laboratory (1)

BIOL 5250 Marine Biology (4)

BIOL 5270 Immunology (3)

BIOL 5320 Vertebrate Physiology (4)

BIOL 5350 Selected Topics in Life Science (1-4)

BIOL 5550 Wildlife Diseases (3)

BIOL 5630 Nutrition (3)

BIOL 5700 Comparative Animal Behavior (4)

BIOL 5720 Human Evolutionary Behavior (3)

BIOL 5740 Tropical Ecology (3)

BIOL 5750 Field Tropical Ecology (1-4 VC)

BIOL 5760 Evolution (3)

BIOL 5770 Macroevolution (3)

BIOL 5800 Parasitology (4)

BIOL 5810 Develop Biology (4)

BIOL 5850 Endocrinology (4)

BIOL 5870 Histology (4)

BIOL 5880 Soil Ecology (4)

BIOL 5890 Molecular Evolution and Ecology (4)

BIOL 5980 Applied Biological Research (1-4 VC)

BIOL 5930 Field Botany (2)

BIOL 5940 Field Zoology (3)

CHEM 5810 Biochemistry 1 (3)

CHEM 5820 Biochemistry 2 (3)

M.S. Thesis Defense

Open seminar and oral defense

Thesis Degree Total: 34

Concentration in Biology (non-thesis option)

Choose at least 9 credits from the following:

BIOL 6000 Research Methods (3)

BIOL 6100 Environmental Physiology (3)

BIOL 6300 Advanced Microbiology (3)

BIOL 6400 Advanced Cellular Biology (3)

PSY 6080 Introduction to Neuropsychology (3)

BIOL 6890 Advanced Ecology (3)

Other required courses:

INDP 6920 Research Ethics (1)

BIOL 6500 Graduate Seminar (1)

BIOL 5590 Lab Safety (1)

BIOL 6200 Advanced Topics (2/2)

Elective Courses, Non-Thesis Option (16)

Elective Courses:

Choose courses in consultation with your adviser in qualifying graduate classes from the graduate catalog: related fields with mentor approval (up to 12 credits from non-biology fields).

Non-Thesis Degree Total: 32

Students in the non-thesis program will complete a comprehensive exit exam and compile a research portfolio in order to fulfill their degree requirements.

Department of Chemistry

Dr. David Sammeth, Department Chair

Ivan Hilton Science Center, Room 232

505-454-3244 FAX: 505-454-3202

E-mail: d7sammeth@nmhu.edu

Mission of the Chemistry Master’s Program
The master of science in chemistry provides training for those who wish to advance their careers in research, industry, government service or teaching. The master of science degree permits the graduate to enter the work force at a level higher than that of a BS graduate. It also prepares students for the rigors of a more advanced professional PhD program of study. Course preparation and advisement are available for students who choose to enter professional schools to study for careers in medicine, veterinary science, dentistry, pharmacy, etc. The Chemistry Program includes the study of inorganic, analytical, physical, organic chemistry, and biochemistry, with applied emphases in medicinal and materials chemistry, reaction mechanisms, and environmental chemistry. This program requires a research project culminating in an original thesis for each student. The chemistry concentration prepares candidates for entry into the chemistry profession or for PhD work.

The department is housed in the new Ivan Hilton Science Center. Modern laboratory research spaces with state-of-the-art safety and teaching features provide students with hands-on, student-centered learning environments. Chemical instrumentation includes: high-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer (nmr), X-ray diffraction equipment, gas and liquid chromatographs, mass spectrometer, IR/UV-visible spectrophotometer, and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). Students who major in chemistry are expected to become fully competent in the use of the instruments by the time they graduate. Students gain a practical perspective on chemistry through involvement with research projects. Graduates of the program are prepared to pursue exciting careers in industry and government, or advance to doctoral studies.

Faculty

Joerg Kutzner, Ph.D. (analytical chemistry)

David Sammeth, Ph.D. (physical chemistry, spectroscopy)

Jan Shepherd, Ph.D. (organic, biochemistry)

Alan Thomas, Ph.D.  (inorganic chemistry)

Tatiana Timofeeva, Ph.D. (physical chemistry, crystallography)

Degree requirements:

Master of Science in Applied Chemistry (MS)

Required courses: 28 credit hours

CHEM 5190 Chemistry Lab 7 (3)

CHEM 5410 Reaction Mechanisms (3)

CHEM 6210 Advanced Analytical Chemistry (3)

CHEM 6710 Chemical Thermodynamics (3)

CHEM 6720 Quantum Chemistry (3)

CHEM 6910 Chemistry Colloquium* (1/1)

*Taken for two semesters to equal a total of two credit hours

CHEM 6990 Thesis* (8)

*A minimum of eight credits is required; students must register for a least one credit hour per term until the thesis is completed, which may exceed the eight-credit hour minimum.

Choose one of the following:

CHEM 5610 Inorganic Chemistry 1 (3)

CHEM 5810 Biochemistry 1 (3)

Electives: 6 credit hours

Choose at least six credits in graduate courses from biology, chemistry, environmental science, geology, physics, or other appropriate disciplines with approval of a graduate adviser.

Degree Total: 34 credit hours

Department of Computer and Mathematical Sciences

Dr. Gil Gallegos, Department Chair
Ivan Hilton Science Building
Room 292
505.454.3302
FAX: 505-454-3169
Email: grgallegos@nmhu.edu

About
The Department of Computer and Mathematical Sciences offers graduate courses in computer science and mathematics. Additionally, a joint media arts and computer science degree is offered by the Department of Computer and Mathematical Sciences and the School of Business, Media and Technology.

Mission of the Department of Computer and Mathematical Sciences
The mission of the Department of Computer and Mathematical Sciences is to train students in the fields of computer science. The mathematics discipline offers an emphasis in an interdisciplinary program within the School of Education’s Curriculum and Instruction master’s program designed for secondary education mathematics teachers. By encouraging and developing problem-solving, critical/analytical thinking, and practical, laboratory-based skills, our students will be well-prepared for careers in any combination of these fields, either through solid preparation for further graduate education or immediate entrance into the workforce (industry, teaching, government, and national laboratories). The department offers graduate-level courses in mathematics and physics that support graduate degrees in other disciplines such as business, chemistry, computer science, and education. The department does not offer standalone graduate degrees. Students who pursue graduate degrees requiring the preparation of a thesis are encouraged to select research topics that require the application of mathematics or physics principles.

Master of Arts or Science in Media Arts and Computer Science (MA or MS)
The disciplines of computer science and media arts are experiencing a significant convergence of interests. Computer science, with its interest in exploring and developing new programming paradigms, big data, analytics, cybersecurity, machine learning, high performance computing, user interfaces, computer networking models, and multimedia-based technologies, is constantly offering new and challenging topics in the field of computer science. The media arts professions, including graphics design, broadcasting, as well as video and audio production, have always sought new and more effective ways to express ideas, concepts, and visions. Thus, they have a natural interest in the possibilities offered by the technologies coming out of computer science. The Department of Visual and Performing Arts and the Department of Computer and Mathematical Sciences jointly offer a program in Media Arts and Computer Science (MACS) that, depending on one’s program of study and background, could lead to either a master of arts or master of science degree.

Students can enter the program starting from either a media arts or computer science perspective and develop further skills in both areas. The key to the program is its interdisciplinary nature, and students are expected to work with students from other disciplines in class and out of class. Students have options of taking both media arts and computer science with the approval of their adviser.

While the program itself is broadly based, students are expected to develop a focused program of study in conjunction with an adviser. Students are encouraged to be innovative in the development of their focus. Possibilities could grow out of multimedia systems, human-computer interface issues, animation and visualization, data mining, and computer vision.

The general entrance requirement for the program is a bachelor’s degree in an area related to one of the disciplines involved in this program or a bachelor’s degree in some unrelated area AND work experience in an area related to one of the discipline areas. To be accepted into the master of science track, a student must have a bachelor of science degree or have a strong mathematics background, including calculus and either discrete mathematics or linear algebra.

Curriculum
To promote the integration of disciplines stressed above, all students take a core set of team-taught courses. This nine-unit core is the foundation of the interdisciplinary nature of this program. The first two courses create the interdisciplinary, collective atmosphere that sets the tone for the rest of the program. Working together, students and faculty from various backgrounds create a common language and educate each other in the core ideas of the different disciplines. In the third course, students use industrial techniques and tools in the development of a sophisticated, multimedia-based project. In all three courses there is time set aside to support the process of developing a thesis project.

Resources and Facilities
The department resides within the Ivan Hilton Science Building on Highlands’ main campus.

There are two large teaching labs, three small research labs, a student work lab, and an area set aside for network experimentation. The labs are equipped, for the most part, with machines running both Windows® and Linux(Ubuntu). The department has a 16-node high performance cluster and a dozen high performance nVidia Tegra boards for high performance computing utilizing embedded systems and hybrid GPU/CPU distributed and parallel programming schemes. Software includes symbolic and numerical products, compilers, integrated development environments, web and multimedia development tools, MATLAB®, R, Python, C/C++, databases, and packages for special fields such as machine learning. Some computers are set aside for student experimentation with the understanding that students may install any software as long as copyright laws are not violated. Additionally, the department has a drone and 3D vision hardware and software for high performance testing of real-time 3D vision applications for research in the computer science field.

Faculty

Gil Gallegos, Ph.D. (Computer science)

John S. Jeffries, Ph.D. (Mathematics)

Richard Medina, Ph.D. (Computer science)

Joe Sabutis, Ph.D. (Physics)

Gregg Turner, Ph.D. (Mathematics)

Master of Arts or Science in Media Arts and Computer Science (MA or MS)

All students must take 6 units of thesis or project work.

CS 6000 Principles of Media Arts and Computer Science (3)

CS 6100 Synthesis of Media Arts and Computer Science (3)

CS 6200 Multimedia Project Development (3)

CS 6970 Field Project (6)

OR

CS 6990 Thesis (6)

Required core: 15 credit hours

With completion of these courses, students begin the process of integrating their special interests with the commitment to maintain an interdisciplinary, collaborative attitude. Students are expected to develop a focused program of study in conjunction with an adviser. They are encouraged to be innovative in the development of their focus.

Electives: 21 credit hours

Choose 21 credit hours (seven courses, from any approved graduate-level courses in computer science, mathematics, or media arts. Students may be able to add courses from psychology, education, art, music, or other disciplines, depending on interests. Students working towards a master of science degree must choose courses from computer science, mathematics, or a discipline offering a master of science degree.

Program Total: 36 credit hours

Department of English

Dr. Lauren Fath, Department Chair
Douglas Hall, Room DH 142
Phone 505-454-3415
FAX: 505-454-3389
Email: lfath@nmhu.edu

Mission of the Department of English
The Department of English M.A. program offers advanced instruction in literature, linguistics, creative writing, and composition. It is designed to provide a strong foundation in advanced research methods for the study of English; a thorough background in the history and development of the English language; current theories in linguistics, literary criticism, and writing; and a variety of electives in the three emphasis areas.

The graduate program serves regional secondary school teachers, prospective community college teachers, students who plan to enter Ph.D. programs and students who seek stronger credentials in English for careers in journalism, publishing, and professional writing. Each year, graduate assistantships are awarded competitively to full-time students. Along with tutoring in the Writing Center, graduate assistants undertake extensive teacher training in composition and gain experience as composition instructors.

Resources and Facilities
The Department of English is located in Douglas Hall, which houses classrooms, the Writing Center, the Language Learning Center, and offices for faculty and graduate assistants in the humanities.

The Department of English provides the services of the Writing Center to students in all university courses as well as in English composition courses. The facility offers individual tutoring and small group work. Teaching assistants in the English M.A. program begin learning tutoring pedagogy while working at the Writing Center during their first semester.

The Department of English houses The New Mexico Review, a literary journal that publishes poetry, fiction, and essays. Graduate students edit and produce each issue of the journal. The M.A. English program also sponsors a chapter of the international English honor society, Sigma Tau Delta.

Faculty

Helen Blythe, Ph.D.

Peter Buchanan, Ph.D.

Lauren Fath, Ph.D.

Juan Gallegos, Ph.D.

Brandon Kempner, Ph.D.

Amanda May, Ph.D.

Sara Olivares, Ph.D.

Eddie Tafoya, Ph.D.

Benjamin Villarreal, E.D.

Donna Woodford-Gormley, Ph.D.

Master of Arts in English (MA)
Students should consult with the director of graduate studies in English prior to registration each term for advisement. During the first meeting, the director and student will develop a program of study for completing the program.

Required Core:

ENGL 5020 Literary Theory (3)

ENGL 5410 History of the English Language (3)

ENGL 6010 Research Methods in English (3)

Students choose one of the following:

ENGL 6990 Thesis (6)

OR

ENGL 6960 Publishable Papers (3)

AND

Electives (3)*

*Approved electives selected in consultation with adviser

Required course for teaching assistants:

ENGL 5150 Methods of Tutoring & Teaching Writing (3)*

Electives: 9 – 12 credit hours

Students take nine hours in their concentration area and electives from any of the concentrations. Please note that for creative writing students, three of their nine credits must be in ENGL 6710. Electives may also include other faculty-approved courses. *Students approved for ENGL 5150 Methods of Tutoring & Teaching Writing take nine credit hours of electives instead of 12 credit hours.

Core & Electives Total: 27 credit hours

Concentration in Literature

Choose three courses from the following:

ENGL 5110 Major American Writers (3)

ENGL 5120 Major British Writers (3)

ENGL 5140 Literary Realism (3)

ENGL 5210 Chaucer (3)

ENGL 5220 Shakespeare (3)

ENGL 5230 Milton (3)

ENGL 5350 Selected Topics in English (3)

ENGL 5/6500 Seminar in English (1-4)

ENGL 5820 Literature of the Southwest (3)

ENGL 5910 Arthurian Literature (3)

ENGL 6100 Major American Poets (3)

ENGL 6360 Varieties of Romanticism (3)

ENGL 6410 History of Popular Literature (3)

Concentration Total: 9 credit hours

Core & Electives Total: 27 credit hours

Program Total: 36 credit hours

Concentration in Linguistics, Literacy and Composition

Choose three courses from the following:

MART 5180 Print of Multimedia (3)

MART 5460 Screenwriting (3)

ENGL 5000 Creative Writing: Experimental Fiction (3)

ENGL 5010 Creative Writing: Advanced Poetry (3)

ENGL 5150 Methods of Tutoring & Teaching Writing (3)

ENGL 5350 Selected Topics in English (3)

ENGL 5430 Sociolinguistics (3)

ENGL 5/6500 Seminar in English (1 – 4)

ENGL 5650 Nonfiction Prose (3)

ENGL 5850 Stylistics (3)

ENGL 6510 Images & Words: Semiotics (3)

ENGL 6610 Literacy and Orality (3)

ENGL 6710 Creative Writing Workshop (3)

Concentration Total: 9 credit hours

Core & Electives Total: 27 credit hours

Program Total: 36 credit hours

Concentration in Creative Writing

Students must take nine credits in creative writing courses, including at least three credits of ENGL 6710: Creative Writing Workshop. This course may be repeated with a change of content.

Choose three courses from the following:

ENGL 5000 Creative Writing: Experimental Fiction (3)

ENGL 5010 Creating Writing: Advanced Poetry (3)

ENGL 5100 Creative Nonfiction (3)

ENGL 5350 Selected Topics in English (1-4)

ENGL 5850 Stylistics (3)

ENGL 6710 Creative Writing Workshop (3)

Concentration Total: 9 credit hours

Core & Electives Total: 27 credit hours

Program Total: 36 credit hours

Examinations
All students completing a thesis must pass a written qualifying examination based on a reading list approved by the thesis committee, the director of graduate studies, and the department chair.

Language Requirement
In addition to the 36 credits required for the MA, students must demonstrate reading knowledge of a language other than English. The language requirement may be fulfilled by: 1) completing the final course of a four-semester undergraduate sequence in a language with a grade of B; 2) completing a 3000- or 4000-level course with a grade of B; 3) passing a test administered by the Department of English; or 4) passing a comparable test offered by another institution and approved in advance by the English graduate committee.

Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences

Dr. Jay Lee, Department Chair
Wilson Physical Education Complex, Room 233
Phone: 505-454-2195
FAX: 505-454-3001
Email: jaylee@nmhu.edu

Mission of the Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences
The mission of the Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences is to improve the quality of life related to the many aspects of human movement. We concentrate on a full spectrum of human potential, from young to old, fit to unfit, recreational to highly athletic, healthy to diseased, and able bodied to disabled. Our programs are related to the study of exercise physiology, health, teaching, athletic injuries, recreation, sport administration, and coaching.

Faculty

Kristin Bogda, Ph.D. (Health)

William Hayward, Ph.D. (Exercise Science)

Kathy Jenkins, Ph.D. (Exercise Science)

Yongseek Kim, Ph.D. (Recreation and Sport Management)

Jay Lee, Ph.D. (Exercise Science)

Joe Schmalfeldt, Ph.D. (Physical Education)

Master of Arts in Human Performance and Sport (MA)
This program continues the undergraduate program’s emphasis on physical education, health, wellness, and sport. The program is flexible in offering a number of course options for school applications; social, legal, and ethical dimensions; advanced exercise physiology; health; and specialized topics such as sports psychology and special physical education.

Students in the master’s program also receive a foundation in inquiring skills including research methods and assessment as preparation for a comprehensive study. Students may select either a thesis, field project or non-thesis option. A total of 36 credit hours are required.

Master of Arts in Human Performance and Sport (MA)

Teacher Education and Sports Administration Concentration
This program presents an opportunity to focus on careers in teaching in the public or private sector, national or international market, or in the sports and fitness industry. Students may select an area of study that best meets their specific interest in the fields of teacher education and sports administration. The following emphasis areas are flexible and inclusive: teacher education and sports administration with advisement, students may select an interdisciplinary approach that best satisfies their specific needs. Students may select a thesis, field project, or comprehensive exam option. A total of 36 credit hours are required.

Exercise and Sport Sciences

Master of Arts in Human Performance and Sport (MA)

Required courses: 6 credit hours

HLED 6200 Research Methods in HPLS (3)

HLED 6700 Assessment & Evaluation in HPLS (3)

Electives: 24 (30 if you choose the Comprehensive Exam Option)

Choose at least 24 credits from the following:

HLED 5210 Epidemiology (3)

HLED 5350 Selected Topic in Health (3)

HLED 5690 Public Health & Wellness (3)

HLED 5740 Stress Management (3)

EXSC 5890 Fitness/Wellness Program Leadership (3)

EXSC 5900 Independent Study (1–4)

EXSC5080 Principles, Ethics, & Problems of Athletic Coach (3)

EXSC 5150 Women in Sport (3)

EXSC 5160 Aquatic Management (3)

EXSC 5210 Designs for Fitness (3)

EXSC 5280 Nutrition & Supplements for Sport (3)

EXSC 5300 ACSM Health Fitness Instructor Review (3)

EXSC 5320 NSCA Strength Coach Review (3)

EXSC 5/6340 Practicum in HPS (1-4)

EXSC 5/6350 Selected Topic in HPS (1-4)

EXSC 5360 Pediatric Exercise Physiology (3)

EXSC 5380 Physical Activity & Aging (3)

EXSC 5610 Sport Marketing & Promotion (3)

EXSC 5650 Planning Areas & Facilities (3)

EXSC 5680 P.E. for Special Populations (3)

EXSC 5720 Biomechanics of Sport (3)

EXSC 5760 Stress Testing (3)

EXSC 5780 Psychology of Coaching (3)

EXSC 5/6900 Independent Study (1-4)

EXSC 6040Curriculum Design (3)

EXSC 6120 Sport in Society (3)

EXSC 6130 P.E., Athletics & Law (3)

EXSC 6410 Issues in HPLS (3)

EXSC 6500Seminar (1)

EXSC 6510 Administration of Athletics (3)

EXSC 6600 History & Philosophy of P.E. & Sport (3)

EXSC 6820 Physiological Basis of Sport Performance & Conditioning Programs (3)

EXSC 6920 Independent Research (1-4)

Students must choose one of the following:

EXSC 6970 Field Project (6)

OR

EXSC 6990 Thesis* (6)

*Students register for at least one credit hour of Thesis until completed; thesis credits hours may exceed the required minimum of six.

OR

Comprehensive Exam Option: Students must complete six more credits of approved electives. In addition, students must pass a comprehensive examination over the graduate program. This examination may not be taken until after midterms in the last semester of coursework.

Program Total: 36 credit hours

Master of Arts in Human Performance and Sport (MA):

Teacher Education and Sports Administration Concentration

Required in either concentration:

Research Methodology: 6 credit hours

GNED 6100 Educational Research Interpretation (3)

OR

HLED 6200 Research Methods HPLS (3)

OR

MGMT 6040 Business Research Methods (3)

AND

EXSC 6700 Assessment & Evaluation (3)

Required core: 12 credit hours

EXSC 6120 Sport in Society (3)

EXSC 6130 P.E., Athletics, & Law (3)

EXSC 6410 Issues in HPLS (3)

EXSC 6040 Curriculum Design (3) (Education Students Only)

OR

EXSC 6510 Administration of Athletics (3) (Sports Administration Students Only)

Core Total: 18 credit hours

Concentration in Teacher Education

Select 12 credits from the following (18 credits if you are selecting the comprehensive exam option).

HLED 5740 Stress Management (3)

EXSC 5080 Principles, Ethics, & Problems of Athletic Coach (3)

EXSC 5150 Women in Sport (3)

EXSC 5160 Aquatic Management (3)

EXSC 5210 Designs for Fitness (3)

EXSC 5280 Nutrition & Supplements for Sport (3)

EXSC 5300 ACSM Health Fitness Instructor Review (3)

EXSC 5320 NSCA Strength Coach Review (3)

EXSC 5/6350 Selected Topic in HPS (1-4)

EXSC 5360 Pediatric Exercise Physiology (3)

EXSC5380 Physical Act & Aging (3)

EXSC 5/6500 Seminar in HPS (1-4)

EXSC 5610 Sport Marketing & Promotion (3)

EXSC 5680 P.E. for Special Pop (3)

EXSC 5720 Biomechanics of Sport (3)

EXSC 5760 Stress Testing (3)

EXSC 5780 Psychology of Coaching (3)

EXSC 5/6900 Independent Study (3)

EXSC 6600 History & Philosophy of P.E. & Sport (3)

EDLD 6730 Public School Administration (3)

EXSC 6820 Physiology Basis of Sport Performance & Conditioning (3)

Concentration Total: 12-18 credit hours

Students must choose one of the following:

EXSC 6970 Field Project (6)

OR

EXSC 6990 Thesis* (6)

*Students register for at least one credit hour of Thesis until completed; thesis credits hours may exceed the required minimum of six.

OR

Comprehensive Exam Option: Students must complete six more credits of approved electives. In addition, the students must pass a comprehensive examination over the graduate program. This examination may not be taken until after midterms in the last semester of coursework.

Program Total: 36 credit hours

Concentration in Sports Administration

Select 12 credits from the following (18 credits if you are selecting the comprehensive exam option):

EDLD 6730 Public School Administration (3)

ACCT 6060 Managerial Accounting (3)

BFIN 6070 Financial Management (3)

MGMT 6640 Organizational Behavior (3)

BMIS 5250 Information Systems: Management Issues & Tech (3)

MKTG 5110 Marketing Res (3)

EXSC 5080 Principles, Ethics, & Problems of Athletic Coach (3)

EXSC 5150 Women in Sport (3)

EXSC 5160 Aquatic Management (3)

EXSC 5/6340 HPS Practicum (1-4)

EXSC 5/6350 Selected Topics in HPS (1-4)

EXSC 5/6500 Seminar in HPS (1-4)

EXSC 5090 Economics & Finance in Sport (3)

EXSC 5120 Public Relations in Sport (3)

EXSC 5610 Sport Marketing & Promotion (3)

EXSC 5650 Planning Areas & Facilities (3)

EXSC 5720 Biomechanics of Sport (3)

EXSC 5780 Psychology of Coaching (3)

EXSC 5/6900 Independent Study (1-4)

EXSC 6040 Curriculum Design (3)

EXSC 6600 History & Philosophy of Sport & P.E. (3)

EXSC 5/6980 Internship (1-9)

(See additional licensure requirements for New Mexico’s State certification.)

Concentration Total: 12-18 credit hours

Students must choose one of the following:

EXSC 6970 Field Project (6)

OR

EXSC 6990 Thesis* (6)

*Students register for at least one credit hour of Thesis until completed; thesis credits hours may exceed the required minimum of six.

OR

Comprehensive Exam Option: Students must complete six more credits of approved electives. In addition, the students must pass a comprehensive examination over the graduate program. This examination may not be taken until after midterms in the last semester of coursework.

Program Total: 36 credit hours

Department of Forestry

Dr. Joshua L. Sloan, Department Chair and Assistant Professor
Ivan Hilton Science Center, Room 335
Phone: 505-454-3208
FAX: 505-454-3103
Email: jlsloan@nmhu.edu

About
The Department of Forestry offers an MS Natural Science degree with a concentration in Environmental Science & Management. This program is designed around a core set of foundational courses after which students develop individualized programs of study (coursework plus independent research) that incorporate each student’s distinctive background, educational goals, and career objectives. Students gain experience in the design, execution, and reporting of scientific research by completing a master’s thesis (thesis option) or an independent study/research project (non-thesis option). The MS Natural Science degree provides a unique opportunity for students to broaden their educational experience to include courses from fields they are less likely to encounter at traditional graduate programs as they prepare for employment in industry, government, or education or entry into doctoral programs.

Faculty

James Biggs, Ph.D. (Forestry)

Blanca Cespedes, Ph.D. (Forestry)

Joshua L. Sloan, Ph.D. (Forestry)

Joseph P. Zebrowski (Geographic Information Science, Forestry)

Master of Science in Natural Sciences

Concentration in Environmental Science and Management

Required Core Courses: 15 credit hours

FORS 5250 Field Safety Practices (1)

BIOL 6000 Research Methods in Life Science (3)

FORS 6200 Advanced Topics in Natural Resource Management (2/2)*

FORS 6250 Advanced Quantitative Methods in Natural Resource Management (3)

FORS/BIOL 6500 Graduate Seminar in Life Science (1/1/1/1)**

*Repeated for credit with different subject matter for a total of 4 credits.

**Repeated 4 times for a total of 4 credits.

 Thesis or Independent Study/Independent Research Credits

Thesis Option:

FORS 6990 Thesis (VC 1-7)*

*Students register for thesis until complete which may exceed the one credit-hour minimum. No more than 7 thesis credits can be counted towards the student’s program of study.

Students choosing the thesis option are required to form a thesis advisory committee and submit a program of study and thesis proposal within the first semester of study. Students are further required to complete a written thesis, following the guidelines established in the Graduate Handbook, and present the thesis orally to the thesis committee.

Non-Thesis Option:

FORS 6900: Independent Study (3)

OR

FORS 6920: Independent Research (3)

Students choosing the non-thesis option are required to form an independent study/independent research advisory committee and submit a program of study and independent study/independent research proposal within the first semester of study. Students are required to submit a written document and present an oral presentation of the independent study/independent research to the advisory committee. Students are also required to pass a comprehensive exam with a grade of 75% or greater. The exam is to be compiled by the student’s committee chair with questions submitted by faculty who taught courses within the student’s program of study. The advisory committee chair will administer the exam and the exam will be graded by the faculty who contributed the questions.

Elective Credit Requirements:

Students are required to take a minimum of 12 (thesis) and 22 (non-thesis option) elective courses. With the advice and consent of an adviser, students choose 5000- and 6000-level courses offered in forestry, geology, biology, chemistry, mathematics, or other appropriate disciplines to develop their program of study.

Degree Total:

Thesis: ≥ 34 credit hours

Non-Thesis: ≥ 40 credit hours

Department of History and Political Science

Dr. Elaine Rodriquez, Department Chair
Douglas Hall, Room 249
Phone: 505-454-3435
FAX: 505-454-3389
email: erodriquez@nmhu.edu

Faculty

Peter S. Linder, Ph.D. (History)

Abbas Manafy, Ph.D. (Political Science)

Elaine Rodriquez, Ph.D. (Political Science)

Kristie Ross, Ph.D. (History)

Steven J. Williams, Ph.D. (History)

Mission of the Department of History and Political Science
History and Political Science forms an academic unit serving the undergraduate and graduate student body with a wide range of courses and possibilities for study. Historical and political understanding and awareness are perceived as one of the chief attributes of a functional and involved citizen of the United States. It is the mission of this department to provide services that will contribute to this goal and to train graduates to work in appropriate fields that require historical and political skills and knowledge.

History
Historians investigate the past in order to understand the present – how we came to be where we are and who we are. The word history comes from the Greek word for inquiry. Historians, broadly speaking, are interested in the social, political, economic, religious, and cultural activities of all people. Their methods include interviewing eyewitnesses of recent events, reading old diaries and letters, and conducting research in public or private repositories. Members of the History faculty at Highlands especially encourage our students to make connections between our own lives and the past.

Students of History can pursue careers in teaching or other professions, and many will continue for an advanced degree in the discipline or enter law school. Professional applications of History include careers in government and business, where the skills of research, communication, and critical thinking are valued. Some History students find positions doing research and preservation work in museums and archives.

Political Science
Aristotle characterized politics as the “queen of the sciences.” Political Science is, in one sense, an ancient discipline and, in another sense, one of the most recently developed social sciences. The origins of the study of politics reach back to the beginnings of human society, for people have always made observations about the nature of their government. It is also true that political science, as it is taught today, is a very new discipline, as current scholars have attempted to move from observations about politics to scientific observations about politics. Political science, in the broadest sense, is the study of governments, governing procedures, and political processes. The Political Science faculty encourage students to make connections between the theoretical (or textbook) study of government/politics, and how government affects their lives in contemporary times. NMHU enables a special focus on the Southwest and minority political studies.

Students in Political Science may seek careers in government, teaching, or private industry. The Political Science major serves as excellent preparation for law school or other academic pursuits such as graduate study. It provides pre-professional training for governmental or public sector positions involving policy-making or administration. Representative employers include government agencies at the national, state or local levels, non-profit organizations, corporations, and research institutions.

Resources and Facilities
History and Political Science are located in Douglas Hall, a newly-renovated building that houses classrooms, the Writing Center, the Language Learning Center, and offices for faculty and graduate assistants in the humanities.

Master of Arts in Public Affairs (M.A.)
The Master of Arts in Public Affairs combines studies in Sociology, Political Science, Anthropology, and History with an interdisciplinary emphasis. The program gives a comprehensive understanding of the social and cultural environment of the public and private spheres through a core curriculum taken by all students that includes political theory, social theory, historiography, and human culture.

Students then select courses from one of the concentration fields of History or Political & Governmental process. Each student receives training in appropriate research methodologies, and completes a thesis or a professional paper, or comprehensive exam.

This program prepares students for doctoral studies and provides enrichment for professionals in public careers such as law, politics, or government service. The program also offers advanced preparation for teachers. The interdisciplinary nature of the program is well suited to such purposes. It combines theory and practice in the following areas: Historical and cross-cultural analysis; archival research; personal and participant observation, interview, and survey techniques; statistical analysis, model building, and simulation as applied to the analysis of social and cultural trends; political and economic policy at local, regional, national, and international levels; and organizational and institutional processes.

The program’s geographic location in a multi-ethnic region of the Southwest brings with its unique perspectives and opportunities. Field and practicum experiences are available to capitalize on the region’s rich social, cultural, and institutional resources. The program’s faculty – from Sociology, Anthropology, History, and Political Science – are all engaged in scholarly research in their respective fields.

The program is administered by and through the discipline of History and Political Science. The course listings for this program may be found among the separate discipline listings for Anthropology, History, Political Science, and Sociology.

Master of Arts in Public Affairs

Required core:

Choose 12 to 15 credits from the following:

ANTH 6510 Seminar: Concepts of Human Culture (3)

HIST 6150 Contemporary Historical Thought (3)

POLS 5630 Political Economy (3)

POLS 6540 Seminar: The State (3)

SOCI 5390 Classical Sociological Theories (3)

Core Total: 12 – 15 credit hours

Choose concentrations from:

  • History
  • Political & Governmental Processes

Elective substitutions in the following concentration areas may be made with faculty and discipline approval in the concentration area.

Concentration in History

Requirement (to be taken as part of the core):

HIST 6150 Contemporary Historical Thought (3)

Complete 12 credits from the following:

HIST 5010 The Chicano Experience (3)

HIST 5030 Chicano Leadership (3)

HIST 5060 North American Frontiers (3)

HIST 5110 Women in the US (3)

HIST 5120 Civil War & Reconstruction (3)

HIST 5130 The US since WW II (3)

HIST 5140 The American President (3)

HIST 5350 Selected Topics in History (3)

HIST 5520 New Mexico History (3)

HIST 5530 History of the Southwest (3)

HIST 6050 The Trans-Mississippi-West (3)

HIST 6180 The Southwest (3)

HIST 6190 NM since Statehood (3)

HIST 6400 Seminar: Modern Mexico (3)

Concentration Total: 12 credit hours

Research Requirement: 3 credit hours

HIST 6200 Research Methods in History (3)

Complete 9 credits in Thesis.*

*Six additional hours of coursework, three hours of HIST 6960 Professional Paper, and one professional paper may be substituted for the nine-hour thesis requirement in this concentration, subject to approval by the student’s adviser and the chair of the Department of History and Political Science.

Program Total: 36 credit hours

Concentration in Political & Governmental Processes

Complete 12 to 15 credits from the following:

POLS 5020 Interest Group Politics (3)

POLS 5100 American Constitution (3)

POLS 5150 Government & Business (3)

POLS 5170 Legislative Process (3)

POLS 5180 Administrative Law & Process (3)

POLS 5190 Public Administration (3)

POLS 5330 Chinese Communist Government (3)

POLS 5460 Government & Politics in Latin America (3)

POLS 5510 Seminar: New Mexico Government & Politics (3)

POLS 5530 IR, Human Rights & International Law (3)

POLS 5580 Political Theory & Philosophy (3)

POLS 5600 The American & Russian Systems (3)

POLS 5620 International Monetary System (3)

POLS 5630 Political Economy (3)

POLS 6110 Seminar: Southwest Politics (3)

POLS 6140 Seminar: Public Policies (3)

Research Requirement: 6 credit hours

POLS 5200 Research Methods in Political Science (3)

HIST 6200 Research Methods in History (3)

Concentration Total: 12-15 credit hours

Thesis Option: POLS 5200 Research Methods in Political Science and 3-6 credit hours in Thesis.

Professional Paper: One professional paper, POLS 5200 Research Methods in Political Science, 3 additional hours of coursework from the concentration area, and POLS 6960 Professional Paper.

Comprehensive Examination Option: A comprehensive written and oral examination, POLS 5200 Research Methods in Political Science, 3 additional hours of coursework from the concentration area, and POLS 6950 Comprehensive Examination.

Program Total: 36 credit hours

Master of Arts in Southwest Studies (M.A.)
The Master of Arts in Southwest Studies marshals interdisciplinary resources in the study of Anthropology, History, and Political Science. Students complete a core of courses in Southwestern prehistory and history; social, political, and cultural dynamics. In addition, each student selects one of two specialized options: Anthropology, with courses in fields such as archaeology and Indians of the Southwest, and History and Political Science, including courses in the American frontier, legislative processes, and New Mexico since statehood. Instruction in appropriate research methodologies then prepares each student for the culminating experience of a thesis.

Because of its multi-ethnic composition, varied traditions, and rich history, the American Southwest lends itself to interesting and important research. NMHU offers a breadth of faculty experience to assist students in their studies.

The Southwest Studies-History Concentration program is administered by and through the discipline of History and Political Science. The course listings for it may be found among the separate discipline listings for anthropology, history, political science, and sociology.

Master of Arts in Southwest Studies (MA)

Required core:

Choose 12 credits from the following list:

ANTH 5130 Archeology of Southwest (3)

HIST 6180 Seminar: The Southwest (3)

POLS 6110 Seminar: Southwest Politics (3)

ANTH 5760 Indians of the American Southwest (3)

OR

ANTH 5770 The Hispanic Southwest (3)

Core Total: 12 credit hours

 

Concentration in History/Political Science

Complete 12 to 15 credits from the following list:

HIST 5010 The Chicano Experience (3)

HIST 5030 Chicano Leadership (3)

HIST 5060 North American Frontiers (3)

HIST 5520 Seminar: New Mexico History (3)

HIST 5530 History of the Southwest (3)

HIST 6050 Seminar: The Trans Mississippi West (3)

HIST 6190 Seminar: New Mexico since Statehood (3)

HIST 6400 Seminar: Modern Mexico (3)

POLS 5170 The Legislative Process (3)

POLS 6140 Seminar: Public Policies (3)

Concentration Total: 12-15 credit hours

Requirement in Research: 3 credit hours

HIST 6200 Research Methods in History & Political Science (3)

Complete six credits in Thesis, in the discipline of the concentration.*

* Six additional hours of coursework and two professional papers may be substituted for the six-hour thesis requirement, subject to approval by the student’s adviser and committee, and the chair of the Department of Humanities.

Department of Languages and Culture

Dr. Eric Romero, Department Chair, Interim
Douglas Hall, Room 249
Phone: 505-454-3435
FAX: 505-454-3389
Email: ericromero@nmhu.edu

Mission of the Discipline of Languages and Culture
Because of its location, the discipline of languages and cultures is committed to the preservation, interpretation, and promotion of the unique multicultural heritage of the region. Thus, it recognizes the importance of the Spanish and Native American presence in the local and global community. The discipline further strives to integrate other foreign languages along with their respective culture and literatures

Faculty

Carol Litherland, MA (American Sign Language)

Eric Romero, Ph.D. (Native American Hispano Studies)

Norma Valenzuela Ph.D. (Spanish)

Edgar Vargas Blanco, Ph.D. (Spanish)

Spanish
The department does not offer a standalone graduate degree. The department offers graduate-level courses in Spanish that support graduate degrees in other disciplines such as Public Affairs, Southwest Studies, and Curriculum and Instruction.

Department of Natural Resources Management

Dr. Jennifer Lindline, Department Chair
Ivan Hilton Science Center, Room 332
Phone: 505-426-2046
FAX: 505-454-3103
Email: lindlinej@nmhu.edu

About
The Department of Natural Resources Management (NRM) Department offers an MS Natural Science degree with concentrations in Environmental Science & Management and Geology. The concentrations share a core set of foundational courses after which students develop individualized programs of study (course work plus independent research) that incorporate each student’s distinctive background, educational goals, and career objectives. Students gain experience in the design, execution, and reporting of scientific research by completing a master’s thesis (thesis option) or an independent study/research project (non-thesis option).  The MS Natural Science degree provides a unique opportunity for students to broaden their educational experience to include courses from fields they are less likely to encounter at traditional graduate programs as they prepare for employment in industry, government, or education or entry into doctoral programs.

The NRM Department also offers a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) graduate certificate. GIS is a computer-based database management system for capture, storage, retrieval, analysis and display of spatial data. The GIS certificate program provides students with a basic proficiency with cutting edge GIS technology that can immediately be applied in the workplace, a highly marketable skill-base when seeking employment, and/or skills for pursuing an advanced degree in GIS. Students who complete the GIS certificate program are prepared to map data for decision-making in business, environmental protection, risk assessment, utility planning and management, emergency response, land use planning, transportation planning, delivery route planning, real estate, crime prevention, and other areas.

Faculty

Jennifer Lindline, Ph.D. (Geology)

Michael S. Petronis, Ph.D. (Geology)

Joseph P. Zebrowski (Geographic Information Systems)

Concentration in Environmental Science and Management

Required Core Courses: 15 credit hours

FORS 5250 Field Safety Practices (1)

BIOL 6000 Research Methods in Life Science (3)

FORS 6200 Advanced Topics in Natural Resource Management (2/2)*

FORS 6250 Advanced Quantitative Methods in Natural Resource Management (3)

FORS/BIOL 6500 Graduate Seminar in Life Science (1/1/1/1)**

*Repeated for credit with different subject matter for a total of 4 credits.

**Repeated 4 times for a total of 4 credits.

Thesis or Independent Study/Independent Research Credits

Thesis Option:

FORS 6990 Thesis (VC 1-7)*

*Students register for thesis until complete which may exceed the one credit-hour minimum. No more than 7 thesis credits can be counted towards the student’s program of study.

Students choosing the thesis option are required to form a thesis advisory committee and submit a program of study and thesis proposal within the first semester of study. Students are further required to complete a written thesis, following the guidelines established in the Graduate Handbook, and present the thesis orally to the thesis committee.

Non-Thesis Option:

FORS 6900: Independent Study (3)

OR

FORS 6920: Independent Research (3)

Students choosing the non-thesis option are required to form an independent study/independent research advisory committee and submit a program of study and independent study/independent research proposal within the first semester of study. Students are required to submit a written document and present an oral presentation of the independent study/independent research to the advisory committee. Students are also required to pass a comprehensive exam with a grade of 75% or greater. The exam is to be compiled by the student’s committee chair with questions submitted by faculty who taught courses within the student’s program of study. The advisory committee chair will administer the exam and the exam will be graded by the faculty who contributed the questions.

Elective Credit Requirements:

Students are required to take a minimum of 12 (thesis) and 22 (non-thesis option) elective courses. With the advice and consent of an adviser, students choose 5000- and 6000-level courses offered in forestry, geology, biology, chemistry, mathematics, or other appropriate disciplines to develop their program of study.

Degree Total:

Thesis: ≥ 34 credit hours

Non-Thesis: ≥ 40 credit hours

Master of Science in Natural Science

Concentration in Geology

Required Core Courses: 15 credit hours

FORS 5250 Field Safety Practices (1)

BIOL 6000 Research Methods in Life Science (3)

GEOL 6220 Advanced Topics in Geology (2/2)*

FORS 6250 Advanced Quantitative Methods in Natural Resource Management (3)

GEOL 6500 Graduate Seminar in Life Science (1/1/1/1)*

*Repeated for credit with different subject matter for a total of 4 credits.

**Repeated 4 times for a total of 4 credits.

Elective Courses: ≥12 credit hours

Students, with the advice and consent of the adviser, choose from 5000- and 6000-level courses in geology, forestry, chemistry, mathematics, computer science, or other appropriate disciplines to bring the total number of credits to at least 34 semester hours.

Thesis: 1 credit hour minimum

GEOL 6990 Thesis (VC1-7)*

*Students register for thesis until complete which may exceed the one credit-hour minimum. No more than 7 thesis credits can be counted towards the student’s program of study.

Degree Total: ≥34 credit hours

Graduate Certificate in Geographic Information Systems

Undergraduate Prerequisite:

GEOL 1110 Survey of Earth Science (4)

FORS 1010 Humans and Ecosystems (4)

POLS 1120 American National Government (3)

ANTH 1140 Introduction to Sociocultural Anthropology (3)

Required Courses (15 credit hours):

FORS 5120 Surveying & Geographic Info System (4)

GEOL 5180 Advanced GIS (4)

GEOL 5150 Remote Sensing (4)

GEOL 5940 Capstone Seminar (3)

Certificate Total: 16 credit hours

Department of Psychology

Dr. David Pan, Chair
Lora Magnum Shields Building, Room 249
Phone: 505-454-3375
Email: dpan@nmhu.edu

Mission of the Department of Psychology
The mission of the Department of Psychology is to provide psychological and sociocultural service and expertise for the region, as well as the greater global community, and to contribute to meeting the educational needs in psychology, the career needs in psychological services and research, and the training for careers in education engineering, physical and biological sciences, medicine, and other science field.

Faculty

Nariman Arfai, Ph.D.

Daniel Chadborn, Ph.D.

Lara Heflin, Ph.D.

Linda LaGrange, Ph.D.

David Pan, Ph.D.

Mathias Stircherz, Ph.D.

Sarah Tracy, Ph.D.

Leon Bustos, M.S.

Joanna Tsyitee, M.S.

Psychology, the study of human behavior and mental processes, includes such topics as learning and memory, cognition, motivation and emotion, sensation and perception, personality, development, attitudes, social interactions, brain-behavior relationships, human sexuality, psychopathology, and mental health interventions.

The special focus in this field is the individual rather than human societies or cultures. Although the study of psychology contributes to the understanding of abnormal human behavior, knowledge of psychology also enhances the understanding of normal human behavior.

Psychological research is conducted exclusively with the scientific method in applications that range from multifactorial laboratory experiments to single case studies. At Highlands, students experience the diversity within the field through a broad selection of courses. There is a cognitive-behavioral emphasis offered in the study of mental disorders, while research psychology is represented by cognitive, biological, social, and personality approaches.

Career goals of psychologists include teaching, research, and service. Psychologists, counselors, and psychometricians work at such sites as schools, mental health centers and hospitals, geriatric facilities, and correctional institutions. The psychological profession also includes school psychologists and human relations or organizational behavior psychologists for industry or government.

Resources and Facilities
The human riches of Northern New Mexico provide an outstanding context for psychological, social, and cultural studies at New Mexico Highlands University. Students may engage in field archaeological digs, ethnographic, psychobiological research, and clinical practicum.

Additionally, students have the opportunity to conduct research in our psychobiology and anthropology labs. Studies of human behavior emphasize field data and computer applications for analysis and interpretation.

The department provides a computer laboratory for student use. Students have access to word processing, spreadsheets, and statistical packages, as well as the Internet.

Student professional societies and organizations, such as Psi Chi, and the Sociology and Anthropology Club, provide opportunities for student participation and program enrichment beyond the classroom.

Psychology

Master of Science in Psychology (MS)

Required core: 30 credit hours

PSYC 6010 Data Analysis & Statistics (3)

PSYC 6020 Behavioral Research Methods (3)

PSYC 6050 Memory & Cognition (3)

PSYC 6080 Introduction to Neuropsychology (3)

PSYC 6120 Psychopharmacology (3)

PSYC 6210 Advanced Social Psychology (3)

PSYC 6400 Advanced Developmental Psychology (3)

PSYC 6510 Profession Ethics & Issues (3)

PSYC 6710 Advanced Psychopathology (3)

Choose one of the following options:

PSYC 6990 Thesis (3)*

*Students register for thesis until complete, which may exceed the 3-credit hour requirement.

Core Total: 30

General Psychology Track

Electives: 6 credit hours

In addition to the core required coursework, students in the general psychology track must also complete six credit hours of electives, including at least one assessment course (three credit hours), which are selected in consultation with an adviser. Advisers work with the student in order to structure the elective courses in accordance with the student’s career goals.

Degree Total: 36 credit hours

Clinical Psychology/Counseling Track

In addition to the core required 30 credit hours of coursework, students in the clinical psychology/counseling track must also complete the following required coursework for a total of 66 credit hours. Students may opt out of thesis and instead take PSYC 6960 Publishable Papers/Capstone.

Required courses: 36 credit hours

PSYC 5250 Introduction to Group Psychotherapy (3)

PSYC 6270 Career Development (3)

PSYC 6720 Introduction to Counseling and Therapy (3)

PSYC 6740 Individual Intelligence Testing (3)

PSYC 6750 Personality Assessment (3)

PSYC 6770 Multicultural Psychotherapy (3)

PSYC 6790 Behavior Therapy & Assessment (3)

PSYC 6810 Neuropsychological Assessment (3)

PSYC 6340 Practicum (12)

PSYC 6960 Publishable Papers/Capstone (3)

OR

PSYC 6990 Thesis (3)

*Students who are Clinical/Counseling that are on the Non-Thesis track must register for PSYC 6960 – Publishable Papers/Capstone INSTEAD of PSYC 6990 – Thesis. Students register for capstone or thesis until complete, which may exceed the 3-credit hour requirement.

Degree Total: 66 credit hours

Department of Sociology, Anthropology, & Criminal Justice

Dr. Gloria Gadsden, Department Chair
Lora Magnum Shields Science Building, Room 245
Phone: 505-454-3209
FAX: 505-454-3331
Email: gygadsden@nmhu.edu

About
The department offers graduate programs in Public Affairs-Applied Sociology and in Southwest Studies-Anthropology. Anthropology also offers a post baccalaureate certificate in Cultural Resource Management (CRM).

Mission of the Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal Justice
The mission of the Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal Justice is to contribute to meeting the educational and research needs in sociology, anthropology, criminal justice and the related fields; contribute to meeting the career needs in social services and social sciences, tribal, state, and federal career requirements, as well as contribute to training for careers in education, law, public service, and other social science fields; contribute to meeting the need for secondary school teacher certification in sociology and/or anthropology; and to provide sociocultural service and expertise for the region, as well as the greater global community.

Faculty

Rebecca Álvarez, Ph.D. (Sociology)

Erika Derkas, Ph.D. (Sociology)

Victoria Evans, M.A. (Anthropology)

Gloria Gadsden, Ph.D. (Sociology)

Mario Gonzales, Ph.D. (Anthropology)

Orit Tamir, Ph.D. (Anthropology)

Kallie Wilbourn, M.A. (Anthropology)

Resources and Facilities
Northern New Mexico provides an outstanding context for social and cultural studies at NMHU. Students engage in field archaeological digs, ethnographic and sociological research, and in practicum experiences. Each student has the opportunity to conduct research in our anthropology lab. Studies of human behavior emphasize field data and computer applications for analysis and interpretation.

Student professional societies and organizations such as the Sociology and Anthropology Club and/or membership in regional or national professional associations provide opportunities for student participation and program enrichment beyond the classroom.

Southwest Studies-Anthropology (MA)
The graduate program in anthropology is a part of an interdisciplinary Master of Arts degree program in Southwest Studies. This includes the disciplines of anthropology and history.

Students complete a common core of courses in Southwestern prehistory, history, and contemporary cultures of the American Southwest. Prior to admission to the program, students select anthropology or history as an area of concentration. Students interested in anthropology will choose one of two emphases – MA in Southwest Studies – Anthropology Concentration (thesis option), MA in Southwest Studies – Anthropology Concentration (professional paper option).

The Master of Arts program’s two emphases prepares students for doctoral programs in anthropology and related fields, teaching, research, and applied positions in cultural resources management, federal, state, and local agencies as well as private business and nonprofit sectors.

New Mexico Highlands University geographic location in a multi-ethnic region of the Southwest provides a unique perspective for archaeological and ethnographic field experiences. The anthropology lab houses a significant collection of prehistoric and historic cultural resources for northeastern New Mexico.

Public Affairs-Applied Sociology (MA)
The graduate program in sociology is part of an interdisciplinary Master of Arts degree program in public affairs. The program provides a comprehensive understanding of the social and cultural environment in the public and private sphere through a common core of courses taken by all students in political theory, social theory and historical thought, human culture, and economic theory. Prior to admission to the program, students select one of the following concentrations: political and governmental processes (see political science in the Department of Humanities), or applied sociology. Students interested in sociology will follow the curriculum described below.

This program prepares students for doctoral studies and may provide enrichment for professionals in public careers such as law, politics, or government service. The program also provides advanced preparation for teachers. The interdisciplinary nature of the program is well suited to such purposes, by combining theoretical knowledge and practical methodology in historical and cross-cultural analysis; archival research; personal and participant observation, interview, and survey techniques; and statistical analysis, model-building, and simulation–applied to analysis of social and cultural trends; political and economic policy at local, regional, national, and international levels; and organizational and institutional processes.

The program’s geographic location in a multi-ethnic region of the Southwest brings unique perspectives. Field and practicum experiences are available to capitalize on the region’s rich social, cultural, and institutional resources.

Sociology and Anthropology

Master of Arts in Public Affairs (MA)

Required core:

Choose 12 to 15 credits from the following:

ANTH 6510 Seminar: Concepts of Human Culture (3)

HIST 6150 Contemporary Historical Thought (3)

POLS 5630 Political Economy (3)

POLS 6540 Seminar: The State (3)

SOCI 6380 Advanced Classical Social Theories (3)

OR

SOCI 6390 Contemporary Sociological Theories (3)

Core Total: 12 – 15 credit hours

Applied Sociology Concentration

Required courses: 10-16 (Depending on Thesis/Non-Thesis Option)

All Applied Sociology Concentration students must take both SOC 6380 and SOC 6390

SOCI 5300 Applied Social Research and Data Analysis (4)

SOCI 6380 Advanced Classical Social Theories (3)

SOCI 6390 Contemporary Sociological Theories (3)

SOCI 6300 Research Methods in Sociology (3)

Choose one of the following, in consultation with your adviser:

SOCI 6990 Thesis (6)*

*Non-Thesis Option for Study: Completion of Two (2) “Professional Papers” and 6 Additional Sociology Elective Credits.

Concentration Total: 10-16

Electives 6-15 credit hours (Depending on Thesis/Non-Thesis Option)

Select in Consultation with Graduate Academic Advisor

Concentration Total: 21-24 Credits

Program Total: 36 credit hours

Master of Arts in Southwest Studies (MA)

Thesis Option

Required core: Choose 12 credits from the following list:

ANTH 5130 Archaeology of Southwest (3)

HIST 6180 Seminar: The Southwest (3)

POLS 6110 Seminar: Southwest Politics (3)

ANTH 5760 Indians of the American Southwest (3)

OR

ANTH 5770 The Hispanic Southwest (3)

General Core Total: 12 credit hours

Concentration in Anthropology

Electives: 12-15 credit hours selected in consultation with graduate adviser. Elective may not be duplicated from core or other required course.

Required courses: 10 credit hours

ANTH 6520 Seminar: Thesis Writing (1)

ANTH 6960 Ethnographic Research Methods (3)

ANTH 6990 Thesis (6)*

Thesis Option Total: 34-37 credit hours 

Non-Thesis Option

Required core: Choose 12 credits from the following list:

ANTH 5130 Archaeology of Southwest (3)

HIST 6180 Seminar: The Southwest (3)

POLS 6110 Seminar: Southwest Politics (3)

ANTH 5760 Indians of the American Southwest (3)

OR

ANTH 5770 The Hispanic Southwest (3)

Concentration in Anthropology

Electives: 15 credit hours selected in consultation with graduate adviser.  Elective may not be duplicated from core or other required courses.

Required courses: 8 credit hours

ANTH 6960 Ethnographic Research Methods (3)

ANTH 5140 Field Methods in Archaeology (2-4)

ANTH 6940 Professional Paper (3)

Non-Thesis Option Total: 35-37 credit hours 

Postbaccalaureate Certificate in Cultural Resource Management (CRM)

Required courses: 20-24 credit hours

ANTH 5100 Method and Theory in Archaeology (3)

ANTH 5130 Archaeology of the Southwest (3)

ANTH 5140 Field Methods in Archaeology (Field School) (2-6)

ANTH 5760 Indians of the American Southwest (3)

OR

ANTH 5770 The Hispanic Southwest (3)

ANTH 5810 Cultural Resources Management (3)

ANTH 6960 Ethnographic Research Methods (3)

Chose in consultation with your adviser, three of the following courses: 9 credits

ANTH 5110 People and Plants in Prehistory (3)

ANTH 5120 Lithic Tech & Analysis (3)

ANTH 5420 Forensic Anthropology and Osteology (4)

GEOL 5120 Surveying & Geographic Information Systems (3)

Program Total: 26 – 30 credit hours minimum

 

Department of Visual and Performing Arts

Prof. David Lobdell, Department Chair
Burris Hall Room 109 D
Phone: 505-454-3570/3126
FAX: 505-454-3241
Email: dlobdell@nmhu.edu

Mission of the Department of Visual and Performing Arts
Visual and Performing students work alongside artists and community members in an integrated curriculum that supports global citizenship within the context of our local, state and national identities.  Faculty lead in the learning process both in and out of the classroom to inform students in historical, technical and aesthetic applications of material, hands on education.  Arts education leads to a wide variety of occupations addressing the professional artist, musician or theatrical performer.

Faculty

Todd Christensen, MFA (Art)

Donald Evans, MA (Speech and Theater)

Andre Garcia-Nuthmann, Ph.D. (Music)

Edward Harrington, Ed.D. (Music)

David Lobdell, MFA (Art)

Shereen Lobdell, MFA (Art)

Resources and Facilities
New Mexico Highlands University provides music studios for audio recording, songwriting, group rehearsal, and individual practice; art studios for ceramics, painting, drawing, jewelry and metalsmithing, printmaking, sculpture, and a fully equipped art foundry.

Students in visual and performing arts are joined by other students on campus and by community members in the Concert Choir, Madrigal Choir, Wind Ensemble, HU Jazz Singers, Guitar Ensemble, Jazz Ensemble, and Mariachi, as well as in four main-stage productions. The gallery in the Burris Hall (the arts building) serves as the focal point for artistic work produced through various classes and studios. The Art Club, and Music Club, are an active part of campus life, and also serve to promote their various programs.

 

Music and Art

While there are no graduate degrees offered in music and art, they may be selected as emphasis areas within the curriculum and instruction master of arts program in education for students wishing to pursue graduate studies in music and art education. In addition, certain music and art courses are applicable as electives in the Department of Behavioral Sciences’ master of arts program in Southwest studies.

Post Baccalaureate Certificate in Fine Arts (30 credit hours)
This curriculum provides the rigorous studio practice and conceptual/art historical framework necessary to develop a portfolio for application to graduate programs in fine arts or to prepare the candidate for a self-directed career in fine art. It is a critique-driven program that requires the student enroll in portfolio development, and exhibition courses, as well as directed study courses.

The program is designed for students with degrees in fields other than art, who have decided to pursue art as a career choice, and will allow them to develop art related portfolios. The Program will help students of New Mexico, the region and the nation advance to master of fine arts programs and develop a clear direction in their work to be competitive as a self-directed, independent fine artist.

Admissions into the post baccalaureate program is contingent upon undergraduate transcripts, CV, and a portfolio of 20 images which demonstrates competency in studio art. Additionally, the applicant must submit a letter of purpose and two letters of recommendation from sources outside of Highlands University. Admission into graduate school is also required.

Students who do not have 15 credit hours of art history classes may be admitted to the program on a provisional basis. These course requirements must be met in order to advance in the program.

Required Courses (18 credits):

ARTS 5910 Portfolio Development and Professional Practices (2)

ARTS 5900 Independent Study (6)

ARTH 5500 Seminar in Art History* (6)

*Repeated with different content

ARTH 5800 Art of the Americas (3)

ARTS 5950 Exhibit (1)

Art Electives (12 credits):

ARTS 5710 Painting 5 (3)

ARTS 5720 Painting 6 (3)

ARTS 5310 Ceramics 5 (3)

ARTS 5340 Practicum (1-4)

ARTS 5350 Selected Topics (1-4)

ARTS 5410 Sculpture 5 (3)

ARTS 5420 Sculpture 6 (3)

ARTS 5500 Seminar in Art (1-4)

ARTS 5610 Jewelry and Metalsmithing (3)

ARTS 5710 Printmaking 5 (3)

ARTS 5720 Printmaking 6 (3)

ARTS 5850 Art Foundry 5 (3)

ARTS 5900 Independent Study (1-4)

ARTS 5960 Exhibit Design (3)

Program Total: 30 credit hours minimum

Music/Theater
The music program at NMHU offers a variety of options to meet the needs of students with personal or preprofessional interests in music. A wide range of choral and instrumental ensembles provides students with opportunities to participate in active music making. These include the Concert Choir, Madrigal Choir (El Coro de la Tierra Alta), Jazz Choir, Wind Ensemble, Guitar Ensemble, Jazz Ensemble, and Mariachi (Vaqueros de la Sierra). Other choral and instrumental ensembles are offered as students’ interest dictates. Scholarship opportunities include activity awards, Lorraine Schula Scholarship, Thomas Mishler Scholarship, Muller Family Scholarship, and the Lorenzo Miguel Gallegos Scholarship.

Students in the music program will become proficient in the necessary skills of music performance according to their particular choice of instrument or voice, while acquiring a thorough knowledge in the philosophy, aesthetics, literature and history of music from Western and Southwest cultures. They will be enabled to enter the teaching profession with the requisite training and knowledge to teach music at the elementary and secondary levels.

Students wishing to pursue music studies in more depth may select music as a major in music performance or music education. The music performance concentration allows serious performers the opportunity to develop appropriate technical skills in preparation for professional careers as musicians. The music education concentration prepares music graduates for full licensure as K-12 music teachers in the public schools of New Mexico, and throughout the region.

Two minors are offered as options to further develop musical skills: music and music technology. The general music minor is designed for students who have a vocational interest in music as a supplement to their principal studies at NMHU. The music technology minor provides songwriting, digital audio editing, and performance experience to students who major in a non-music discipline such as media arts, literature, or business.

Fine Art
The art faculty at New Mexico Highlands University provides students with a strong foundation in the visual arts. The program offers a range of traditional media and upper-division course work that qualifies the student to enter a graduate program or embark on a professional career.

Training in art history as well as in hands-on studio provides the knowledge of skills, techniques and critical thinking required of a committed artist. By nurturing ideas and creativity, a student is able to become visually literate, technically competent, historically informed and conceptually relevant.

Contemporary artists often combine digital media with traditional works. The art program supports the interrelationship of media arts with its traditional disciplines as students learn to merge these fields. The program also recognizes the need for training in electronic media for the publication and documentation of traditional art work. Course work in basic imaging skills is required with other upper division courses may be selected from a list of elective courses.

NMHU’s art discipline reserves the right to retain students’ work submitted for course credit for a limited time for the purposes of education, exhibition, and promotion. Lab fees are required for all studio courses. Expenses vary from course to course and some supplies will be provided from student fees.

School of Business, Media and Technology

Veena Parboteeah, Ph.D., Dean
Sininger Hall, Room 235
Phone: 505-426-2088
FAX: 505-454-3354
Email: parbotev@nmhu.edu

Faculty

Ali Arshad, Ph.D. (Economics & Finance) Rio Rancho

Chien-Chun Chen, Ph.D. (Marketing)

Emmanuel Nkwenti-Zamcho, DBA (International Business & Management) Rio Rancho

James Peters, Ph.D., retired CPA (Accounting)

Rodney Sanchez, Ph.D. (Management) Rio Rancho

Charles Swim, DBA (Management) Rio Rancho

Keith Tucker, DBA (Management & Finance)

Kent Tucker, DBA (Finance)

Mission
The School of Business, Media and Technology promotes best professional practices, preparing students for successful careers and future academic endeavors. Our active learning environment supports critical and creating thinking, cultivating ethical problem solvers.

Vision Statement
The School of Business, Media and Technology will be the premier school in the southwest, preparing students to become successful and respected professionals. We strive to extend frontiers of knowledge to solve complex problems.

The Department of Business Administration Accreditation
The Department of Business Administration is accredited by the Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP) to offer the master of business administration (MBA) degree with concentrations in accounting, entrepreneurship, finance, human resource management, international business, management and marketing.

The MBA is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission (HLC) as an online degree. Students can be physically located anywhere in the world and complete the MBA degree from New Mexico Highlands University.

Mission of the Department of Business Administration
The Department of Business Administration is committed to the success of our students and to the highest observance of our professional accreditation standards. The department’s goal is to be the best small business department in the Southwest, preparing students to be confident, competent, ethical, and responsible business decision-makers, managers, leaders, and agents of economic and social betterment in today’s changing global business environment. 

Vision Statement
The Department of Business Administration provides an inspiring multicultural learning environment that promotes excellence, empowerment, transformation, and global understanding.

Core Values

  • Advancement of knowledge
  • Active leaning
  • Student success
  • Diversity of ideas
  • Accessible education
  • Community
  • Individual well-being
  • Sustainable practices
  • Multiculturalism

Resources and Facilities

NMHU Campus
The MBA degree is available live at the main campus. Department of Business Administration classroom facilities and faculty offices are located in Sininger Hall on the NMHU campus directly across the quadrangle from Thomas C. Donnelly Library. Distance education-equipped classrooms are available in the building. High-speed wireless internet and networked computer facilities are located throughout the campus, which provide student access to online classes and course materials.

Distance Education
Our MBA degree and concentrations are also offered completely online. 

NMHU Center/Sites
The MBA degree is offered on site at the main campus and online elsewhere. Business faculty advisers are located at the New Mexico Highlands University center in Rio Rancho.

Requirements for admission to the MBA Program:

  1. Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA in undergraduate coursework to be admitted to the MBA program. However, students with a GPA between 2.8 – 2.99 may be provisionally admitted if space is available. Students provisionally admitted with low GPA must earn a minimum 3.0 GPA in their first 12 credit hours to remain in the program.
  2. Students with an undergraduate degree in a field other than business are required to complete a proficiency course, BUSA 5000, to establish an appropriate background for graduate work in business administration. Students must take BUSA 5000 in their first semester of coursework.
  3. All students are expected to have computer proficiency and be able to use basic tools of business: word processing and spreadsheets. Students lacking these skills are advised to take classes in these areas prior to requesting admission to the program.

Master of Business Administration (MBA)
The master of business administration is a 36 credit hour program for students with a background in business. Students lacking undergraduate coursework in business must take a proficiency course, BUSA 5000 Principles of Business Administration, in their first semester. A minimum of at least 30 credit hours must be taken in courses restricted to graduate students. The program prepares students for leadership positions in business, state and federal government, or non-profit institutions. Building on a foundation of management, accounting, finance, economics, and marketing, the program emphasizes administrative ability, managerial potential, financial decision making, and long-range planning skills.

Our program utilizes an intensive problem-solving approach, featuring case studies and simulations across the spectrum of decision areas within business organizations and emphasizing the integrative nature of managerial responsibilities.

Dual Master’s Degrees in Business and Social Work
New Mexico Highlands University allows students to complete Masters Degrees in Social Work (MSW) and Business Administration (MBA) with minimal overlap. Interested students should refer to the catalog section for the School of Social Work.

Exit Requirements for Completing the MBA Degree
During the last semester of MBA coursework all students must take MGMT 6890 Business Strategy. MGMT 6890 is the MBA capstone course and focuses on strategic business and case analysis of business problems. Upon successful completion of any deficiencies and all coursework, the student will be nominated to candidacy for the MBA degree.

Required courses: 27 credit hours

MBA students lacking or with limited undergraduate coursework in business must take BUSA 5000 Principles of Business Administration (3). The course hours are in addition to the required business core courses of 27 credit hours.

Required Core:

MGMT 6010 Quantitative Methods (3)

MGMT 6040 Business Research Methods (3)

ACCT 6050 Financial Accounting (3)

ECON 6080 Managerial Economics (3)

BFIN 6070 Managerial Finance (3)

BLAW 6390 Law and Ethics in Bus (3)

MKTG 6840 Marketing Management (3)

MGMT 6210 Business and Society (3)

MGMT 6890 Business Strategy (3) (taken in last semester)
(ACCT 6050 is not required for students in the accounting concentration)

Core Total: 27 credit hours

Students must choose an MBA concentration from one of the following areas:

Concentration in Accounting

Proficiency Courses:
Students must have a demonstrated proficiency in the following two courses; the courses may be assigned or waived depending on the student’s prior coursework: ACCT 3870 Intermediate Accounting 1 (3) and ACCT 3880 Intermediate Accounting 2 (3).

Required Courses for Concentration in Accounting

Required Courses: 12 credit hours

ACCT 6060 Managerial Accounting (3)

ACCT 6850 Financial Statement Analysis (3)

Choose 2 courses from the following list:

ACCT 5810 Accounting Systems (3)

ACCT 5920 Auditing (3)

ACCT 5890 Governmental Accounting (3)

Concentration Total: 12 credit hours

Core: 24 credit hours

Program Total: 36 graduate-level credit hours 

Concentration in Entrepreneurship

Required Courses: 9 credit hours

MGMT 5310 Entrepreneurial Forum (3)

MGMT 5510 Entrepreneurship (3)

MKTG 6510 Managerial Approach to Internet Marketing Strategies (3)

Concentration Total: 9 credit hours

Core: 27 credit hours

Program Total: 36 credit hours 

Concentration in Finance

Required Courses: 9 credit hours

BFIN 5050 Financial Markets & Institutions (3)

BFIN 6090 Investments (3)

ACCT 6850 Financial Statement Analysis (3)

Concentration Total: 9 credit hours

Core: 27 credit hours

Program Total: 36 credit hours 

Concentration in International Business

Required Courses: 9 credit hours

BFIN 5750 International Finance (3)

INTB 6400 International Business (3)

MKTG 5740 International Marketing (3)

Concentration Total: 9 credit hours

Core: 27 credit hours

Program Total: 36 credit hours 

Concentration in Human Resources Management

Required Courses: 9 credit hours

MGMT 6640 Organizational Theory (3)

MGMT 6650 Personnel Practices and the Law (3)

MGMT 6870 Human Resources Management (3)

Concentration Total: 9 credit hours

Core: 27 credit hours

Program Total: 36 credit hours 

Concentration in MSW/MBA Human Resources Management

Required Courses: 9 credit hours

MGMT 6640 Organizational Theory (3) OR

SOWK 6640 Organizational Theory (3)

MGMT 6650 Personnel Practices and the Law (3)

MGMT 6870 Human Resources Management (3)

Concentration Total: 9 credit hours

Core: 27 credit hours

Program Total: 36 credit hours 

Concentration in Management

Required Courses: 9 credit hours

MGMT 6640 Organizational Theory (3)

BMIS 5800 Project Management (3)

MKTG 6510 Managerial Approach to Internet Marketing Strategies (3) or

INTB 6400 International Business (3)

Concentration Total: 9 credit hours

Core: 27 credit hours

Program Total: 36 credit hours

 

Concentration in Marketing

Required Courses: 9 credit hours

MKTG 5150 Consumer Behavior (3)

MKTG 6510 Managerial Approach to Internet Marketing Strategies (3)

MKTG 5730 Advertising (3)

Concentration Total: 9 credit hours

Core: 27 credit hours

Program Total: 36 credit hours 

Certificate in Accounting (Graduate)

Proficiency Courses:

Students must have a demonstrated proficiency in the following courses; the courses may be assigned or waived depending on the student’s prior coursework:

ACCT 3870 Intermediate Accounting 1 (3)

ACCT 3880 Intermediate Accounting 2 (3)

Certificate Courses: 18 credit hours

Choose six courses from the following list

ACCT 5810 Accounting Systems (3)

ACCT 5890 Governmental Accounting (3)

ACCT 5920 Auditing (3)

ACCT 6050 Financial Accounting (3)

ACCT 6850 Financial Statement Analysis (3)

ACCT 6060 Managerial Accounting (3)

BLAW 6390 Law & Ethics in Business (3)

Certificate: 18 graduate-level credit hours 

Certificate in Finance (Graduate)

Choose six courses from the following:

BFIN 5050 Financial Markets & Institutions (3)

BFIN 6070 Managerial Finance (3)

BFIN 6090 Investments (3)

BFIN 5750 International Finance (3)

ACCT 6050 Financial Accounting (3)

ACCT 6850 Financial Statement Analysis (3)

ECON 6080 Managerial Economics (3)

Certificate: 18 credit hours 

Certificate in Human Resources Management (Graduate)

Required Courses: 12 credit hours

MGMT 6210 Business and Society (3)

MGMT 6640 Organizational Theory (3)

MGMT 6870 Human Resources Management (3)

MGMT 6650 Personnel Practices and the Law (3)

Elective Courses: 6 credit hours

Choose two graduate-level business courses in consultation with an adviser.

Certificate: 18 credit hours 

Certificate in Marketing

Required Courses: 12 credit hours

MKTG 5730 Advertising (3)

MKTG 5150 Consumer Behavior (3)

MKTG 6510 Managerial Approach to Internet Marketing Strategies (3)

MKTG 6840 Marketing Management (3)

Elective Courses: 6 credit hours

Choose two graduate-level business courses in consultation with an adviser.

Certificate: 18 credit hours

Media Arts & Technology

Prof. Miriam Langer, Department Chair
Trolley Building, Room 136
Phone: 505-454-3588
Email: melanger@nmhu.edu

Faculty

Mariah Fox Hausman, MFA (Media Arts)

Miriam Langer, MFA (Media Arts)

Angela Meron, MFA (Media Arts)

Elias Gonzales, MA (Media Arts)

Lauren Addairo, MA (Media Arts)

Jonathan Lee, MA (Software Systems Design)

Rianne Trujillo, MA (Software Systems Design)

Master of Business Software Systems Design (MS MSSD)

Applying to the MS degree Media Arts
Although the SSD program adheres to the NMHU admission guidelines, the program conducts its own selections and admissions process for all graduate applications. Applications are generally for full-time enrollment only; part-time study is discouraged. Applications are reviewed annually and students are encouraged to apply by April 15 for priority consideration. Students who are interested in applying for assistantships in particular are encouraged to apply early, since assistantships are granted based in part upon admission to the program.

Requirements for admission to the MS Program:
Students should submit the following:

  • A graduate application for admission (available from the Graduate Student Office)
  • A personal Objective Statement/essay (600 – 1,000 works)
  • An official transcript (in a sealed envelope) from each university attended. Official electronic transcripts can be sent to graduate@nmhu.edu
  • Three letters of reference from individuals familiar with the students’ academic abilities, work experience, and personal characteristics
  • A link to your online portfolio which includes links to three projects in your area of interest (code, games, or hardware projects); examples should be of your own work, if projects were group created, please include a write up detailing your role in the project for the MSSD program.

Full and Provisional Acceptance: To gain admission to the program, students should have at least a 3.0 overall GPA (based on a 4.0 scale). Students who do not meet these requirements but who demonstrate other strengths may be admitted to the program on a provisional status while they make up deficiencies. Students with a low GPA must maintain a 3.0 or higher GPA for the first year and then the provisional acceptance is waived. Successful applicants should demonstrate the ability to perform well in a challenging academic program, the interest and ability to perform creative research, and the personal communication skills necessary for the field of Software Systems Design. Successful applicants will possess goals and a career orientation that are congruent with the SSD program’s philosophy and emphasis. 

Supplies
A personal laptop is strongly recommended for each graduate student in the department. The department provides industry standard software, but unfettered access through a personal computer is recommended.

Scholarship
To qualify for the degree a final GPA of 3.0 is required. Students earning below 3.0 will be placed on a semester of academic probation/provisional status. 

Media Arts & Computer Science – MACS

Concentration in Media Arts

This program is no longer accepting students as of Fall 2019
With completion of these courses, Media Arts graduate students develop proficiency in a variety of technology driven production tools used by professionals in the fields of visual communication, interactive design, multimedia, photography, filmmaking, and physical computing. Students synthesize their knowledge in a final project or thesis.

Required Core: 15 credit hours

CS/MART 6000 Principles of Media Art & Computer Science (3)

CS/MART 6100 Synthesis of Media Arts & Computer Science (3)

CS/MART 6200 Multimedia Project Development (3)

CS/MART 6970 Field Project (6)

OR

CS/MART 6990 Thesis (6)

Required Core: 15 credit hours 

Electives:
Choose seven courses (21 credit hours) from the following courses, from any approved graduate-level course in computer science, mathematics, or media arts. At least one of the courses must be in a discipline other than the area of concentration. Students may be able to add courses from psychology, education, art, music or other disciplines, depending on interests. Students working toward a Master of Science degree must choose courses from computer science or mathematics, or from a discipline that offers a Master of Science degree:

MART 5050 Digital Painting (3)

MART 5130 Non-linear Editing (3)

MART 5150 Design Projects for the Community (3)

MART 5170 Publication Design (3)

MART 5180 Principles of Multimedia (3)

MART 5220 HD Cinema Workshop (3)

MART 5260 Multimedia Project Management (3)

MART 5270 Web Production Workshop (3)

MART 5360 Experimental Video Production (3)

MART 5460 Screenwriting (3)

MART 5520 Audio Production in Radio (3)

MART 5560 Physical Computing (3)

MART 5570 Surround & Installation Workshop (3)

MART 5590 Advanced Interactive Multimedia (3)

MART 5600 Alternative Photographic Techniques (3)

MART 5610 Advanced Design Practice (3)

MART 5620 Video Effects (3)

MART 5630 Video Animation (3)

MART 5640 Advanced Digital Cinema (3)

MART 5660 Audio for Video (3)

MART 5670 Character Animation (3)

MART 5690 Advanced Video Animation (3)

MART 5730 Typography (3)

MART 5750 Advanced Screenwriting (3)

MART 5950 Exhibition Design (3)

MART 5960 Advanced Exhibition Design (3)

Core: 15 credit hours

Electives: 21 credit hours

Program Total: 36 credit hours 

Requirements for Master of Arts in MSSD

Degree Timeline

Year 1

Note: all provisional requirements must have been met prior to enrolling in graduate level courses

Fall: BSSD 6000

BSSD 5410 (elective)

By the end of the semester:

Complete Program of Study and identify your committee chair and members. Deliver oral presentation to the entire Media Arts faculty.

Spring: BSSD 6100

Elective

Elective

By the end of the first academic year:

Deliver a qualifying Oral Exam to the faculty. Successful competition or the oral exam enables you to continue into the second year of the program. Note: a failing grade will terminate your continuation in the program.

Please address the following in your visual/oral presentation:

  1. What is the scope of the field project/thesis?
  2. List references for others who have done projects that inspire or inform the work you are proposing.
  3. What do you hope to learn from the project that’s new to you and the field in general?
  4. What materials (hardware/software) do you need to achieve the project?
  5. What do you hope to learn from the project that’s new to you and the field in general?
  6. Who is the best faculty team (you need two people in Media Arts and one person outside of the department) to help you achieve your goals?
  7. What is your timeline for completion?

Year 2

Fall: MA BSSD 5340

Elective   Elective

Elective   Elective

Spring: Elective   BSSD 6340

Field Project/Thesis   Field Project/Thesis

By the end of the second academic year:

Submit final draft of field project paper or thesis to committee for review at least two weeks before the oral defense.

Defend field project or thesis to committee in a public presentation.

Submit graduation clearance paper work.

Master’s Degree in Software-Driven Systems Design (MA BSSD)
Upon completing the program, Software Systems Design graduate students will have developed proficiency in a variety of programming languages and hardware solutions used by professionals in the fields of software development, web development, mobile development, game development, physical computing, and microcontrollers. Students synthesize their knowledge in a final field project or thesis.

Required Core: 23 credit hours

BSSD 6000 Principles of Software Designs (3)

BSSD 5410 Applied Algorithms & Architecture (3)

MART 6100 Synthesis of Media Arts & CS (3)

BSSD 5340 Practicum (4)

BSSD 6340 Practicum (4)

Choose one:

BSSD 6970 Field Project (6) OR

BSSD 6990 Thesis (6)

Elective courses: 15 credit hours

Choose 5 courses from the following:

BSSD 5150 Game Development (3)

BSSD 5200 Mobile Applications (3)

BSSD 5250 Advanced Mobile Applications (3)

BSSD 5300 Advanced Web Applications (3)

BSSD 5310 Web Applications (3)

BSSD 5450 Ambient Computing (3)

BSSD 5520 JavaScript (3)

BSSD 5650 Patterns & Pattern Languages (3)

BSSD 5700 Interfaces (3)

BMART 5560 Physical Computing (3)

CS 5730 Artificial Neural Networks (3)

CS 5740 Machine Learning Algorithms (3)

CS 5360 Human-Computer Interaction (3)

Core: 23 credit hours

Electives: 15 credit hours

Program Total: 38 credit hours

Master of Fine Arts in Cultural Technology, MFA (MFACT)
The Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in Media Arts Cultural Technology is a 3-year terminal degree with 2 1/2 years of course work and one semester of thesis. The Media Arts and Technology Department currently resides in the School of Business, Media and Technology where it sits among other programs with a professional focus. The MFA degree is the current standard for a terminal degree in this field for those wishing to pursue an academic or high-level professional career. The program positions graduates to work in the constantly evolving field at the intersection of culture and technology. The MFA faculty seek to cultivate multi-talented students capable of working in all areas of interpretive media. Students will become proficient in several technological areas including design, the creation and installation of exhibitions, responsive installations, audio/video production, web/mobile application development, user experience, and the application of these skills to cultural, historical and scientific content. The purpose of this program is to engage highly skilled, creative, ethically-aware cultural technologists capable of working with the richness of diverse cultural content.

Requirements for the admission to the MFA Program:

Students should submit the following:

  • A graduate application for admission (available from the Graduate Student Office)
  • An official transcript (in a sealed envelope) from each university attended. Official
  • Electronic transcripts can be sent to graduate@nmnhu.edu.
  • Personal Objective Statement/essay (600 – 1,000 works) demonstrating writing

capabilities, which addresses the following: purpose in seeking an MFA degree at NMHU Media Arts & Technology, research interests, personal and technical strengths; what you bring to our program.

  • Link to an online portfolio of best/relevant work, including detailed descriptions (2D work: 10-20 samples, video: not more than approximately 5 min. reel) which demonstrates proficiency, research or exploration in: photography,videography, digital imaging, writing, exhibition, design, code, games, or
  • Hardware projects.
  • Three (3) letters of reference from individuals familiar with the student’s abilities
  • Work experience and personal characteristics.
  • Resume/CV
  • A one-time non-refundable $25 application fee.
  • A phone or video interview may be requested before final acceptance.

Supplies
A personal laptop is strongly recommended for each graduate student in the department. The department provides industry standard software, but unfettered access through a personal computer is recommended.

Scholarship
To qualify for the degree a final GPA of 3.0 or better is required. Students earning below 3.0 will be placed on a semester of academic probation/provisional status.

Required Core: 51 credit hours + Elective Courses: 9 credit hours

Total credit hours: 60

Year 1                                                            

Fall     

MART 6180 History of Media Seminar (3)

MART 6210 Studio I (3)

MART 5xx0 Elective course (3)

Spring

MART  6220 Studio II (3)

MART 6310 Media Theory (3)

MART 6550 Critical Practice I (3)

Summer                                                                    

MART 6980 Cultural Technology Internship I (3)

Year 2                                                            

Fall     

MART 6920 Thesis Research & Writing I (3)

MART 6230 Studio III (3)

MART 6560 Critical Practice II (3)

Spring

MART 5260 Multimedia Project Management (3)

MART 5950 Exhibition Design (3)

MART 6240 Studio IV (3)

Summer                                                                    

MART 6980 Cultural Technology Internship II (3)

Year 3                                                            

Fall     

MART 6920 Thesis Research & Writing II (3)

MART 5xx0 Elective course (3)

MART 5xx0 Elective course (3)

Spring

MART 6920 Thesis Research & Writing III (3)

MART 6990 Thesis (6)

Core:  51 credit hours

Electives:  9 credit hours

Program Total:  60 credit hours

Requirements for MFA                                                                   

Degree Timeline
Students are eligible to graduate after completion of 60 graduate credit hours and have passed a final oral defense in conjunction with a written thesis document, and a public exhibition of the final body of work. Reviews each semester for the first two years are required; passing the end-of-second year review will qualify a student to continue on MFA Cultural Technology path or alternatively, be dismissed from the program.

MFA students must successfully complete at least 8 credits of qualifying cultural technology exhibit design and internship (regular and intermediate) with a museum, business or institution and 24 credits of required seminar/writing/critical thinking courses.

The remaining courses consist of studio and elective credits.  Well prepared students may complete the program in 5 semesters while others may elect to extend behind that time.  Students wishing to become instructors in higher education should actively apply for the available teaching assistantship positions and/or take pedagogy-related classes as electives.

Advisement
The graduate student coordinator will provide course advisement, a program of study and assist with scheduling until the student has chosen a faculty mentor from Media Arts who will serve as their primary academic advisor and the chairperson of their committee (by end of semester).

By the end of the fourth semester, graduates must have secured their final advisory committee of three members (two Media Arts and Technology academic faculty and one qualified expert outside the department of university. A fourth, optional advisor will be allowed. This committee can be formed earlier, but should be in place no later than the fourth semester.

Review, Thesis and Defense Requirements
Practice Review (First semester)

Submit and present initial projects and concepts to the Media Arts & Technology faculty for review feedback.  This required review is considered practice and designed to make improvements for future reviews and critiques.  A written evaluation, signed by the graduate coordinator and department chair will be provided to the student and kept in the student’s file

First Year Review (Second Semester)
Submit and present further developed projects and concepts to the Media Arts & Technology faculty for review feedback.  The student should inquire/indicate the potential advisory committee, or one will be assigned by the graduate coordinator and department chair.  This review indicates whether the student has begun to find a focus.  A written evaluation signed by the graduate coordinator, department chair and current advisory committee will be provided to the student and kept in the student’s file. 

MFA Evaluation/Review (Third Semester)
Submit and present project concept and accompanying written draft document to the Media Arts & Technology advisors/faculty for feedback.  The student should indicate their choice of advisory committee.  This review will access the student’s performance at the present time and should indicate what improvements are needed and necessary to qualify for the MFA work into the next semester.  If the student presents poorly at this juncture, further measures will be addressed for continuance towards the MFA degree.  If the student shows promise, the committee will promote the student to the suggested MFA path for semester four and present the formalized thesis concept.  A written evaluation, signed by the advisory committee, graduate coordinator and/or department chair will be provided to the student and kept in the student’s file.

Qualifying MFA Thesis Project Review/Oral Presentation (Fourth semester
Deliver a qualifying oral presentation and refined body of work to the advisory committee and faculty.  Successful completion of the qualifying MFA thesis oral exam enables regular continuation towards the third year of the program.  Students who do not pass this review shall be required to continue working and present once again the following semester.  Note: If a student fails two reviews in a row, dismissal from the program will occur.  A written evaluation, signed by the advisory committee, graduate coordinator and/or the department chair will be provided to the student and kept in the student’s file.

The following should be adequately addressed in the qualifying visual/oral presentation:

  1.  What is the scope of the project/thesis?
  2.  List references for other projects that inspire or inform the work proposed.
  3.  What skills are utilized within the project?
  4.  What materials (hardware/software) are needed to achieve the project?
  5.  What learning occurs from the project that’s new/relevant to the field in general?
  6.  Who is the best advisory team (two faculty in Media Arts and one person outside of the department) to help achieve the goals?
  7.  What is the proposed timeline for completion?

Thesis Defense/Review (Fifth and Sixth semesters)                                                                     

To qualify for graduation:

  1.  Complete all credit requirements and apply for degree with registrar
  2.  Submit written thesis component to the advisory committee at least two weeks prior to scheduled defense date
  3.  Publicly schedule, exhibit, and orally defend body of thesis work to advisory committee

The following should be adequately addressed in both the oral and written defense/thesis presentation:    

  1.  Clearly describe the project/thesis in abstract and in-depth format.
  2.  Explain skills, mediums and materials (hardware/software) utilized within the project. 3.  Thoroughly document the process of creating the work (including successes, plateaus and failures).
  3.  Discuss, compare and relate others who have done projects that inspire or inform this work.
  4.  What personal learning occurred from creating the project that is new/relevant in the field?
  5.  How can/will this work affect, influence or improve society and culture?
  6.  What makes this work unique and unprecedented?
  7.  Include bibliographical citations and labels/descriptions for all images/figures.
  8.  Bind the written document.

Note:  If the advisory committee determines the work does not satisfy MFA defense requirements, the student is evaluated and advised to continue taking courses and/or working on areas of weakness until defense requirements are satisfied.

School of Education

Mary Earick, Ph.D., Dean
Victoria D. de Sanchez Teacher Education Center, Room 114B
Phone: 505-454-3357
FAX: 505-454-3384
Email: maryearick@nmhu.edu

Mission Statement
We immerse our students in authentic academic and professional settings, providing them with opportunities to bridge theory and practice and to engage in critical reflection that informs action. 

Vision
To be a premier school of education that prepares educators, leaders and counselors as agents of social change who transform the lives of individuals and communities they serve. 

Graduate Faculty

Kevin Ensor, Ph.D. (School Counseling)

Geri Glover, Ph.D. (School & Clinical Counseling)

Robert Karaba, Ph.D. (Educational Leadership)

Anna Koch, Ph.D. (Rehabilitation & Clinical Counseling)

Douglas Main, Ph.D. (Rehabilitation & Clinical Counseling)

Michael Morad-McCoy, ABD (Clinical Counseling)

Seonsook Park, Ph.D. (Curriculum & Instruction/ Reading, TESOL)

Rodney Rock, Ed.D. (Educational Leadership)

Lori Rudolph, Ph.D. (Clinical Counseling)

Eva (Efstathia) Yerende, Ph.D. (Curriculum & Instruction/ Bilingual, TESOL)

Ann Wolf, Ed.D. (Curriculum & Instruction/ Reading)

Core Values

Authentic Learning

Reflective Practice

Diversity

Social Justice

Excellence/Quality

Transformation 

Resources
The Teacher Education Center (TEC) building serves as a home for the Northeast Regional Education Cooperative, Advanced Placement-New Mexico, the Counselor Training Center, MESA-Northern New Mexico, and the Center for the Education & Study of Diverse Populations.

Established by the School of Education, the Center for the Education and Study of Diverse Populations studies diverse populations whose needs are unmet and who encounter barriers to services and opportunities, and develops strategies for removing those barriers.

In addition, the School of Education houses a regional Instructional Materials Evaluation Center that contains publisher-supplied samples of state-approved texts and materials for review by school district administrators, teachers, parents, and education faculty and students. The center also functions as an institutional curriculum library, providing selected samples of resources for short-term loan. The Literacy Council of Northeastern New Mexico staffs an adult literacy center and provides services within the Instructional Materials Evaluation Center.

The School of Education offers selected undergraduate and graduate programs at the centers in Santa Fe, Rio Rancho and Farmington with the cooperation of the Educational Outreach Services Program.

The Purpose of the School of Education
The purpose of the School of Education is to provide highly qualified, entry-level early childhood, elementary, secondary, and/or special education teachers and other professional personnel such as, educational leaders and counselors, to serve New Mexico and/or national P-12 school districts, institutions of higher education and counseling agencies. The program is embraced by the following themes: diversity, leadership, culturally inclusive, authentic setting(s), practice, reflective practitioner, and knowledge and steeped in a conceptual framework that fosters democratic access to an education, allowing the reflective practitioner to continue to develop cultural schemas, diverse cognitive processing skills to construct a knowledge base that is entwined in our school’s themes.

Graduate Programs in Education and Counseling
The master’s program in education accepts students with personal commitment to the discipline who also meet the standards of scholarship. With the exception of a degree in counseling, master’s candidates complete 12 credits of coursework in educational content and 12 credits in a selected emphasis field, as well as 12 credits in appropriate research methodologies. Educational leadership requires 15 credits in the content areas and nine credits in a selected emphasis field.

School counseling and rehabilitation counseling require a 48 semester-hour curriculum. The clinical mental health counseling and clinical rehabilitation counseling concentrations require a 60 semester-hour curriculum. All four concentrations require successful completion of coursework, internship experience, an exit exam, and a case presentation or professional paper. A vocational evaluation specialization is also available to rehabilitation students.

The master’s degree in education offers a variety of concentrations and emphases. The master of arts option in educational leadership prepares individuals for licensure in administration or to serve in leadership roles in higher education.

The master of arts option in special education provides the opportunity to specialize in the areas of general special education, cognitive impairments, learning disabilities and emotional and behavioral disorders.

The master of arts in counseling and guidance offers a variety of concentrations in school counseling, rehabilitation counseling, clinical mental health counseling and clinical rehabilitation counseling. The different concentrations qualify students to apply for licensure or certification by various state and national agencies.

The curriculum and instruction option offers graduate work in a variety of academic content fields with both elementary and secondary emphases. The emphasis fields available to curriculum and instruction students include the educational subjects of Reading, Technology Education, Early Childhood Education, TESOL, Bilingual Education, and Gifted Education; and Arts and Sciences subjects including music, art, English, Spanish, history, political science, chemistry, life science, mathematics, computer science, business, and human performance and sport.

Master of Arts in Counseling (MA)

Counseling
The core of the counseling program is the same for all four concentrations then, each concentration has a set of courses that prepare you to work within different settings. We have only one fully online concentration which is a 48-credit concentration in Rehabilitation Counseling. For our other three concentrations, although a number of courses are available online for our Las Vegas Campus, and Farmington and Santa Fe Centers, there are several courses that are taught via online video technology, and three-four courses which must be taken in-person. Students in the Rio Rancho/Albuquerque area take most of their courses in person. Also, please be aware that only a handful of our online courses are taught completely asynchronously. Most of our online courses do have a scheduled online meeting time.

The Clinical Mental Health Counseling concentration prepares and qualifies graduates to apply to be Licensed Mental Health Counselors (LMHC) with the New Mexico Counseling and Therapy Practice Board, and the applicant is then granted permission to sit for the National Counselor Exam (NCE). The LMHC is the initial license for clinical mental health counselors in New Mexico and is the first step toward becoming a Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor (LPCC) who can work independently. Clinical mental health counselors work in a variety of settings including agencies, school health clinics, private practice, behavioral health institutions, drug and alcohol rehabilitation centers, and community clinics. They work with people individually, in groups, and as families on issues which can range from minor adjustment problems to chronic mental illness.

Clinical Rehabilitation Counselors work in settings as identified below under the 48-credit Rehabilitation Counseling concentration, but also have the additional training needed for licensure as mental health counselors with the general population and qualify to apply to be Licensed Mental Health Counselors (LMHC) with the New Mexico Counseling and Therapy Practice Board.

The School Counseling concentration qualifies and prepares counselors to apply for licensure by the New Mexico Public Education Department. School counselors work in PreK-12 settings following a model such as the one promoted by the American School Counselor Association. School counselors do classroom guidance (preventative education); group and individual counseling; program management; and, student planning.

Our 48-credit Rehabilitation Counseling concentration is accredited by the Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) and graduates are qualified to apply for their Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) credential. Rehabilitation Counseling also meets requirements for licensed rehabilitation counselors in the schools set by the State of New Mexico Public Education Department. Rehabilitation counselors work in vocational rehabilitation settings with people with a variety of disabilities including chronic mental illness, physical disabilities, traumatic brain injury, developmental delays, and drug and alcohol dependence. Rehabilitation counselors work in schools (typically high schools) as transition counselors assisting students with special needs in transitioning into and out of high school. In addition,

Applications for the Counseling Program are reviewed twice each year just after the application deadlines; Spring semester, October 31st, Summer & Fall semesters, April 15th.

In addition to the concentrations described above, the Counseling Department has three certificate programs that lead to licensure in their respective fields. Programs are open to students with a master’s degree in counseling, or a related counseling field as determined by the counseling faculty. Coursework qualifies a person to apply for licensure. Licensure is conferred by respective state agencies. The Professional Counseling Certificate coursework qualifies a person to apply with the New Mexico Counseling and Therapy Practice Board for the LMHC.

The Rehabilitation Counseling Certificate coursework qualifies a person to apply for National Rehabilitation Certification (CRC) under Category R if the applicant meets the requirement of thirty-six months of acceptable work experience, including twenty-four months supervised by a CRC. The School Counseling Certificate coursework qualifies a person to apply to the New Mexico Public Education Department for school counselor licensure. A specialization in vocational evaluation is also available to students in the rehabilitation counseling concentration. Students must complete COUN 646 Vocational Evaluation, Assistive Technology, and Transition Planning and COUN 648 Advanced Vocational Evaluation with an internship in vocational evaluation.

For graduation, students must complete all coursework with a minimum of a 3.0 overall GPA, successful completion of internships, a written comprehensive exam, and a comprehensive case presentation or professional paper. The written exam is the Counselor Preparation Comprehensive Exam (CPCE), which covers the eight core-curriculum content areas. Rehabilitation counseling students can choose to take the Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) Exam that covers ten curriculum areas rather than the CPCE.

As required by the American Counseling Association’s (ACA) Code of Ethics (and the CRC’s Code of Ethics) students who fail to demonstrate personal and professional appropriate and/or ethical behavior may be denied continuation in the program until some form of remediation is fulfilled. If a student demonstrates such questionable behavior, he or she will meet with the faculty of the Counseling Program to discuss the faculty’s concerns. If remediation is deemed necessary, the student will not be allowed to continue in the program until such remediation is completed. The student’s acceptance of admission into the Counseling Program is understood as a tacit acceptance of these terms of admission.

Otherwise, counseling students are assessed by the faculty at three major points: after completion of the pre-practicum course, during and after the practicum, and throughout the two-semester Internship. (As noted above, if there is a concern before these points, the faculty will call a meeting with the student to determine the need for and nature of remediation.) The purpose of these assessments is to determine students’ suitability and potential for development as counselors. If the faculty has concerns at any point regarding a student’s potential for being a counselor, the adviser will be responsible for informing the student of this concern. According to the ACA and the American School Counselor Association (ASCA), it is the responsibility of the counselor educators to monitor the professional development of the student-counselor at all times and to take appropriate measures if indications of behavioral, emotional, or mental problems arise in any given student.

 

If a student needs remediation, the forms that it may take include the following:

  • The student may be asked to retake the pre-practicum course.
  • The student may be asked to take additional coursework to make up any academic deficiencies that might be noticed.
  • The student may be asked to seek out and engage in personal counseling or psychotherapy. If this is required, the student may be asked to spend a semester out of the program.
  • The student may be asked to dis-enroll from the program altogether.
  • If remediation is required, the student has the option to appeal such decisions. The steps of the appeal process are:
  • The student writes an appeal within one week of receiving the remediation plan stating the reasons why the student believes the remediation to be unjust or inappropriate. The statement is addressed to the student’s adviser and to the chair of the Counseling Department.
  • The adviser and/or the chair meets with the student within a week after receiving the written appeal to hear the appeal and to listen to suggested alternatives.
  • The adviser and chair meet with the other counseling faculty within a week after meeting with the student to discuss the student’s case.
  • If no change is made to the original decision, then the student can take the appeal to the Dean of the School of Education.
  • If no change is made to the original decision the student can take the appeal to the Dean of Students.

At each step, the same process is followed. The student submits a written appeal to the University person involved. A meeting is arranged with the student by that person. The student presents his or her case with suggestions for an alternative remediation. A decision follows.

Program Summary Credit Hours Totals:

Program Totals:

Clinical Mental Health Counseling = 60 credit hours

Clinical Rehabilitation Counseling = 60 credit hours

Rehabilitation Counseling = 48 credit hours

School Counseling = 60 credit hours

Rehabilitation Counseling with Vocational Evaluation Specialization = 54 credit hours

Master of Arts in Counseling (MA)
The program is structured around two components: core curriculum, which includes research and methodology, and concentration specific coursework.

Required core: 39 credit hours

COUN 6000 Theories and Practice of Counseling

COUN 6010 Professional Counseling and Ethical Practice (3)

COUN 6030 Career Development (3)

COUN 6050 Essential Interviewing and Process in Counseling (3)

COUN 6070 Group Counseling Theory and Practice (3)

COUN 6080 Assessment and Testing (3)

COUN 6090 Human Growth and Development (3)

COUN 6110 Cultural Diversity and Social Justice (3)

COUN 6280 Research and Program Evaluation (3)

COUN 6310 Addiction Counseling Theory and Practice (3)

COUN 6340 Practicum (3)

COUN 6980 Internship in Counseling (6)*

* 6000 hours over two semesters. Three credits each semester. This can be done in one semester with approval of adviser in special circumstances. In cases where a student is unable to complete the hours requirement by the end of the second semester of internship, the student must continue to enroll for at least one credit hour of COUN 6980 until requirements are met.

Core Total: 39 credit hoursStudents choose one of the following concentrations:

Concentration in Clinical Mental Health Counseling

Required courses:

COUN 6100 Diagnosis and Treatment Planning (3)

COUN 6150 Family and Couples Counseling (3)

COUN 6190 Issues in Clinical Mental Health Counseling (3)

COUN 6290 Trauma and Crisis Intervention (3)

Electives: 9 credit hours

Choose three courses in consultation with an adviser.

Concentration Total: 21 credit hours

Core Total: 39 credit hours

Program Total: 60 credit hours

Concentration in Clinical Rehabilitation Counseling

Required Courses:

COUN 6100 Diagnosis and Treatment Planning (3)

COUN 6400 Foundations, Case Management, and Job Placement in Rehabilitation (3)

COUN 6460 Vocational Evaluation, Assistive Technology, and Transition Planning (3)

COUN 6490 Psychiatric Rehabilitation and Co-Occurring Disorders (3)

COUN 6730 Medical Aspects of Disability (3)

COUN 6740 Psychosocial and Cultural Aspects of Disability (3)

Electives: 3 credit hours

Choose one course in consultation with an adviser.

Concentration Total: 21 credit hours

Core Total: 39 credit hours

Program Total: 60 credit hours

Concentration in Rehabilitation Counseling

Students may choose a specialization in vocational evaluation in addition to this emphasis (see below).

Required courses: 9 credit hours

COUN 6400 Foundations, Case Management, and Job Placement in Rehabilitation (3)

COUN 6730 Medical Aspects of Disability (3)

COUN 6740 Psychosocial and Cultural Aspects of Disability (3)

Concentration Total: 9 credit hours

Core Total: 39 credit hours

Program Total: 48 credit hours

Concentration in School Counseling

Required courses: 15 credit hours

COUN 6020 Counseling Children & Adolescents (3)

COUN 6150 Family and Couples Counseling (3)

COUN 6200 School Counseling P-12

COUN 6330 College and Career Planning P-12

COUN 6360 Restorative Justice and Conflict Resolution

Electives: 6 credit hours

Choose one course in consultation with an adviser.

Concentration Total: 21 credit hours

Core Total: 39 credit hours

Program Total: 60 credit hours

Specialization in Vocational Evaluation in Rehabilitation Counseling Option
The vocational evaluation specialization in rehabilitation counseling at Highlands is a 54 semester-hour program. Full-time students take the rehabilitation counseling emphasis in the manner prescribed by their adviser. In addition, students take the following courses:

Emphasis in Vocational Evaluation

Required courses: 6 credit hours

COUN 6460 Vocational Evaluation, Assistive Technology, and Transition Planning (3)

COUN 6480 Advanced Vocational Evaluation (3)

Additional Requirement:

COUN 6980 Internship in Vocational Evaluation (3)*

* The vocational evaluation specialization requires one semester of internship in a vocational evaluation setting. This internship must be one of the two semesters required by the rehabilitation concentration.

Specialization total: 6 credit hours

Rehabilitation Concentration: 48 credit hours

Program total: 54 credit hours

Certificates
The following certificate programs are open to students with a Master’s Degree in Counseling, or a related field as determined by the counseling faculty. Coursework qualifies a person to apply for licensure. Licensure is conferred by the respective state agency.

Professional Counseling Certificate (LMHC)
The Certificate Program in Professional Counseling qualifies a person to apply Licensure through the New Mexico’s Counseling and Therapy Practice Board as a Licensed Mental Health Counselor (LMHC), and the applicant is then granted permission to sit for the National Counselor Exam (NCE).  An LMHC enables the person to practice mental health counseling under supervision while working toward licensed professional clinical counselor (LPCC) Status.

Required courses:

COUN 6090 Human Growth and Development (3)

COUN 6100 Diagnosis and Treatment Planning (3)

COUN 6150 Family and Couples Counseling (3)

COUN 6190 Issues in Clinical Mental Health Counseling (3)

COUN 6290 Trauma and Crisis Intervention (3)

COUN 6980 Internship in Counseling (Clinical Setting) (3)

Certificate Total: 18 credit hours

Rehabilitation Counseling Certificate (CRC, PED K-12)
The Certificate Program in Rehabilitation Counseling qualifies a person to apply for National Rehabilitation Certification (CRC) under Category R if the applicant meets the requirement of thirty-six months of acceptable work experience including twenty-four months supervised by a CRC.

A second option is available for residents of New Mexico and that is to be licensed through the Public Education Department (PED) as a rehabilitation counselor K-12 with the public schools. This PED license will enable a person to work specifically with students who have an IEP (Individualized Education Plan), and with students in transition in the schools.

Required courses:

COUN 6400 Foundations, Case Management, and Job Placement in Rehabilitation (3)

COUN 6460 Vocational Evaluation, Assistive Technology, and Transition Planning (3)

COUN 6490 Psychiatric Rehabilitation and Co-Occurring Disorders (3)

COUN 6730 Medical Aspects of Disability (3)

COUN 6740 Psychosocial and Cultural Aspects of Disability (3)

COUN 6980 Internship in Counseling (Rehabilitation Setting) (3)

Certificate Total: 18 credit hours

School Counseling (PED K-12)
The Certificate Program in School Counseling qualifies a person to sit for the School Counseling exam through the PED. Upon passing this exam, the person can apply for a school counselor license and be eligible to work in public and private schools as a school counselor.

Required courses:

COUN 6020 Counseling Children and Adolescents (3)

COUN 6150 Family and Couples Counseling (3)

COUN 6200 School Counseling P-12

COUN 6980 Internship in Counseling (School Setting) (3)

Certificate Total: 12 credit hours

Master of Arts in Curriculum and Instruction (MA)
This program is structured around three components: required core, emphasis area, and research methodology.

Required courses: 12 credit hours

EDLD 6250 Educational Leadership (3)

OR

EDUC 6450 Sociocultural Factors Affecting Education (3)

EDUC 6150 Instructional Strategy & Mentoring (3)

EDUC 6410 Advanced Educational Psychology (3)

EDUC 6630 Principles of Curriculum Construction (3)

Research Methodology: 6 credit hours

GNED 6050 Statistics for Educators (3)

EDUC 6100 Educational Research Interpretation (3)

Emphasis Area: 12 credit hours

Students select an emphasis area in consultation with their education adviser and advisers for the field(s) of study selected. Emphasis area options are available in many of the university’s content fields. Specifically, emphasis-area options may be formulated from programs which offer 5000- and/or 6000- level courses in many disciplines including Advanced Placement and outside the school of Education, including art, music, Spanish, English, philosophy, history, political science, business, human performance and sport, anthropology, sociology, psychology, computer science, mathematics, life science (in biology and environmental science), chemistry, geology, physics, and also in technology teacher education, reading, early childhood multicultural education, gifted education, TESOL, and bilingual education. The adviser for the area of interest should be consulted.

In formulating plans for the emphasis area, students and advisers must consider various limitations: the frequency of offering of the necessary 5000- and 6000- level courses, both during the fall and spring semesters and in the summer session (the selection may be especially limited for students who rely totally or principally on classes scheduled in evenings and/or summers); any requirement from the New Mexico Public Education Department; having the preparation to undertake advanced studies in the field; and for students whose undergraduate degrees are from NMHU, the availability of appropriate 5000-level courses that were not taken already at the 4000-level.

Field Project/Thesis/Comprehensive Exam: 6 credit hours

Choose one of the following options:

EDUC 6970 Field Project (6)

OR

EDUC 6990 Thesis (6)*

*Students must register for thesis until complete which may exceed the six credit-hour requirement.

OR

Comprehensive Exam (6)*

*Comprehensive exam option: Students must complete six additional credits of approved electives instead of the six hours required for the field project/thesis. In addition, the students must pass a comprehensive examination over the graduate program. This examination may not be taken until after midterms in the last semester of coursework.

Program Total: 36 credit hours

Additional stipulations for admission to the Master of Arts in curriculum and instruction: Students have received licensure for teaching in the State of New Mexico or the equivalent. Applications should indicate a desired emphasis area at the time of application.

Advanced Placement Certificate
AP-New Mexico was developed at NMHU in 1993 to encourage and support teachers and schools in New Mexico to expand Advanced Placement (AP) course offerings for New Mexico secondary students. AP-New Mexico coordinates Advanced Placement Summer Institutes (APSI), which are professional development events of no less than four days with no fewer than 30 instructional hours.

The institutes bring together teachers to discuss course-specific content, instructional strategies, course organization and methods for increasing student participation in courses that help them acquire the skills and habits they will need to be successful in college. Advanced Placement Teaching is for teachers who wish to increase or develop their knowledge of the total AP Program and enhance or implement an AP or pre-AP program in their school.

Required courses: 12 credit hours

GNED 6300 Advanced Placement Institute (3)

GNED 6400 Curriculum Design & Management for Advanced Placement (3)

GNED 6500 Foundations of the Advanced Placement Program, Leadership Approaches, & Vertical Teaming (3)

GNED 6520 Advanced Placement (3)

Certificate total credit hours required: 12 Credit hours

Bilingual Education Certificate
Post baccalaureate students seeking a certificate leading to a bilingual education endorsement must complete a minimum of 12 credits hours of coursework at the graduate level.  All endorsements are awarded by the New Mexico Public Education Department (NMPED) and are subject to NMPED guidelines and requirements. These include completion of a bachelor’s degree in education and a New Mexico teaching license. It is important to note that the bilingual endorsement further requires passing the Prueba de Español para la Certificacion Bilingue exam or the language proficiency exam in Navajo. Those interested in other New Mexico pueblo languages must consult with their specific tribe. It is critical to consult carefully with the Licensure Unite at NMPED regarding these language matters.

Required courses: 12 credit hours

EDUC 5120 Theories and Principles of Bilingual Education (3)

EDUC 5370 Instructional Methods for the Bilingual Classroom (3) (SPAN 300 prerequisite)

RDED 5160 Reading in the Bilingual Classroom/La Esenanza de lectura en el Salon Bilingue

OR

RDED 5450 Literatura infantil y juvenil (3)

RDED 5270 Reading in the Content Area (3)

Certificate total credit hours required: 12 credit hours

Reading Certificate
Post baccalaureate students seeking a certificate leading to reading endorsement must complete a minimum of 12 credits hours of reading courses at the graduate level.  Additional credits in reading may be required depending on the student’s prior coursework in reading, and prior licensure and endorsement history.  All endorsements are awarded by the New Mexico Public Education Department (NMPED) and are subject to NMPED guideline and requirements.

Required courses: 12 credit hours

RDED 5110 Teaching Reading and Diagnosis (3)

RDED 5260 Reading & Literature for Children & Young Adults (3)

OR

RDED 5450 Literatura infantile y juvenile (3)

RDED 5270 Reading in the Content Area (3)

RDED 5400 Integrating Technology into Language Arts Curriculum (3)

OR

RDED 5420 Literacy and Technology (3)

Certificate Total: 12 credit hours

Secondary Education Certificate
Prospective teachers holding a bachelor’s degree may complete the secondary certificate program in order to obtain a secondary license in New Mexico.  In addition to completing coursework listed on the framework, candidates must have 24 credits, including 12 upper division, in a content area taught in the public schools.

Required Courses: 28 credit hours

EDUC 1190 Field-Based 1 Teacher Preparation Experience (1)

EDUC 3510 Field-Based 2 Teacher Preparation Experience (2)

EDUC 3020 Educational Psychology (3)

RDED 5270 Reading in the Content Area (3)

EDUC 5100 The Art and Science of Teaching (3)

EDUC 5440 Technology in Education (3)

EDUC 4510 Field-Based 3 Teacher Prep Experience (6)

EDUC 5550 Classroom Management

Certificate total credit hours required: 28 credit hours

TESOL Certificate
Post baccalaureate students seeking a certificate leading to an endorsement in Teaching English to speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) must complete a minimum of 12 hours of coursework at the graduate level. All endorsements are awarded by the New Mexico Public Education Department (NMPED) and are subject to NMPED guidelines and requirements. These include completion of a bachelor’s degree in education and a NM teaching license. It is important to note that the TESOL endorsement further requires a minimum of six credits in another language or passing the Prueba de Español para la Certificacion Bilingue exam. In addition to coursework, the NMPED requires passing the NMTA’s TESOL content examination.

Required Courses: 12 credit hours

EDUC 5170 English as a Second Language (3)

EDUC 5200 Sheltered English (3)

RDED 5270 Reading in the Content Area (3)

RDED 5200 Literacy for English Language Learners (3)

Alternative Teacher Certification Program
The Alternative Teacher Certification Program (ATCP) is designed to for individuals who have earned a bachelor’s master’s, or doctoral degree and are interested in pursuing a teaching license.  Initially, the program will be offered online asynchronously with some required synchronous seminars. It may also be delivered in a traditional face-to-face format in the future. Candidates will be encouraged to obtain an alternative teaching license and secure a teaching position so that they are immersed from day one as a teacher of record in a classroom. Candidates may also choose to secure a position as a long-term substitute teacher or as a co-teacher in a cooperating teacher’s classroom. Participants who are serving as the teacher of record in a classroom will be assigned a mentor teacher, either through their school or by the School of Education. All candidates will participate in an internship seminar throughout the duration of the program. The internship seminar provides ATCP candidates with the opportunity to interact with and receive support from a university supervisor and other candidates, engage in dialogue related to the course topics, share their experiences and challenges, work collaboratively on projects, engage in activities that prompt them to bridge theory into practice, and reflect on their own practice. Each seminar is aligned with the coursework taken during the 8-week session. The School of Education offers three individualized Alternative Teacher Certification Programs:  Elementary, Secondary, and Special Education.

Elementary Program (21 credits)

Semester 1 (first 8 weeks)

EDUC 5400 Orientation to the Profession (2)

EDUC 5420 Effective Teaching I (3)

EDUC 5500 Seminar/Internship 1(1)

Semester 1 (second 8 weeks)

EDUC 5460 Curriculum, Planning, Assessment, & Evaluation (3)

EDUC 5430 Effective Teaching II (3)

EDUC 5500 Seminar/Internship (1)

Semester 2 (first 8 weeks)

RDED 5150 Elementary Reading I: Early Literacy (3)

RDED 5110 Elementary Reading II: Diagnosis and Teaching of Reading (3)

EDUC 5500 Seminar/Internship (1)

Semester 2 (second 8 weeks)

EDUC 5500 Seminar/Internship (1)

Secondary Program (18 credits)

Semester 1 (first 8 weeks)

EDUC 5400 Orientation to the Profession (2)

EDUC 5420 Effective Teaching I (3)

EDUC 5500 Seminar/Internship 1(1)

Semester 1 (second 8 weeks)

EDUC 5460 Curriculum, Planning, Assessment, & Evaluation (3)

EDUC 5480 Content Methods for Secondary (3)

EDUC 5500 Seminar/Internship 1(1)

Semester 2 (first 8 weeks)

RDED 5270 Reading in the Content Area (3)

EDUC 5500 Seminar/Internship 1(1)

Semester 2 (second 8 weeks)

EDUC 5500 Seminar/Internship 1(1)

Special Education (21 credits)

Semester 1 (first 8 weeks)

EDUC 5420 Effective Teaching I (3)

EDUC 5470 Essential Processes (3)

Semester 1 (second 8 weeks)

EDUC 5430 Effective Teaching II (3)

SPED 5400 Universal Design for Learning (3)

EDUC 5500 Seminar/Internship 1(1)

Semester 2 (first 8 weeks)

RDED 5150 Early Literacy (3)

EDUC 5500 Seminar/Internship 1(1)

Semester 2 (second 8 weeks)

RDED 5110 Diagnosis and Teaching of Reading (3)

EDUC 5500 Seminar/Internship 1(1)

Master of Arts in Educational Leadership (MA)
This program is structured around three components: required core, emphasis area, and research methodology. Two options are available for master’s degree candidates in educational leadership.

Option One is to pursue a master’s degree with eligibility for a New Mexico K-12 school administrator license. Stipulations for admission to this option is that candidates will have received licensure for teaching in the state of New Mexico or the equivalent AND have a minimum of six (6) years of licensed K-12 teaching.

Option Two is to pursue a master’s degree without eligibility for a New Mexico K-12 school administrator license. This option is tailored for candidates who do not have a teaching license or teaching experience or wish the leadership and administrative knowledge obtained from the program. Candidates who choose this option would take all course requirements except the two semesters (six credit hours) of Internship. Instead they would take two additional three-credit elective courses approved by their adviser in the program to meet the 36-hour MA requirements.

Required courses: 18 credit hours

EDLD 6000 Instructional Leadership & Organizational Change (3)

EDLD 6150 School Finance & Resource Allocation (3)

EDLD 6200 Legal Issues for School Leaders (3)

EDLD 6400 Supervision & Evaluation of Personnel (3)

EDLD 6600 Data-Informed Instructional Leadership (3)

EDLD 6800 Reflective Leadership (3)

Option One (6 credit hours):

EDLD 6980 Internship 1 (3) (Required for all K-12 licensure candidates)

EDLD 6980 Internship 2 (3) (Required for all K-12 licensure candidates)

Option Two Electives (6 credit hours):

EDLD 6100 Action Research in Education (3)

EDLD 6250 Educational Leadership & Principal-ship (3)

EDLD 6300 School Community Relations (3)

EDLD 5/6350 Selected Topics in EDLD (1-3)

EDUC 6630 Principles of Curriculum Construction (3)

EDLD 6900 Independent Study (1-4)

Research Methodology: 6 credit hours

GNED 6050 Statistics for Educators (3)

EDUC 6100 Educational Research Interpretations (3)

Field Project/Thesis/Comprehensive Exam: 6 credit hours

EDLD 6970 Field Project (6)

OR

EDLD 6990 Thesis (6)*

*Students must register for thesis until complete which may exceed the six credit-hour requirement.

OR

Comprehensive Exam (6)*

*Comprehensive exam option: Students must complete six more credits of approved electives. In addition, the students must pass a comprehensive examination over the graduate program. This examination may not be taken until after midterms in the last semester of coursework.

Program total 36: credit hours

Educational Leadership Certificate
Candidates seeking to complete the certificate program leading to licensure for the purpose of attaining education administration licensure must hold an MA or MS and a New Mexico level III teacher licensure. Candidates for the certificate program are expected to complete 18 credit hours of coursework from the educational leadership core course sequence. Additionally, candidates are required to complete six credit hours of university-supervised administrative internship (over two semesters).

Required courses: 24 credit hours

EDLD 6000 Educational Leadership and Organizational Change (3)

EDLD 6150 School Finance and Resource Allocation (3)

EDLD 6200 Legal Issues for School Leaders (3)

EDLD 6400 Instructional Leadership, Supervision, and Evaluation (3)

EDLD 6600 Data Informed Instructional Leadership (3)

EDLD 6800 Reflective Leadership (3)

EDLD 6980 Educational Leadership Internship 1(3) ***

EDLD 6980 Educational Leadership Internship 2 (3) ***

Internships (EDLD 6980 I & II) are required by the NNMPED and do not qualify for substitution.

Certificate total credit hours required: 24 credit hours

EDLD 6110 Action Research in Education (3)

EDLD 6250 Educational Leadership and the Principal-ship (3)

EDLD 6300 School Community Relations (3)

EDLD 6350 ST: Educational Leadership (3)

EDLD 6900 Independent Study (3)

 

Master of Arts in Special Education

This program is structured around three components: A Capstone Project is also required of all students, and is selected when the Special Education Program of Study is completed. Successful completion of the Gateway ALPHA, Gateway BETA and Gateway Gamma is also required of students seeking Special Education licensure as part of the MA program.

 

Special Education Content Area Courses Required: 12 credit hours

SPED 5010 Diagnosis of Exceptional Child (3)

SPED 5/6500 Seminar in Special Education (3)

SPED 6120 The Special Education Program (3)

SPED 6750 Organization & Administration of Special Education (3)

Research Methodology: 6 credit hours:

GNED 6050 Statistics for Educators (3)

EDUC 6100 Educational Research Interpretation (3)

 

Special Education Core courses:

RDED 5110 Teaching and Diagnosis of Reading (3)

SPED 5100 Curriculum & Methods for Students with Mild & Moderate Exceptionalities (3)

SPED 5200 Curriculum & Methods for Students with Severe Exceptionalities (3)

SPED 5300 Reading Instruction in Special Education (3)

 

Field Project/Thesis/Comprehensive Exam: 6 credit hours

SPED 6970 Field Project (6)

OR

SPED 6990 Thesis (6)*

*Students must register for thesis until complete which may exceed the six credit-hour requirement.

OR

Comprehensive Exam (6)*

*Comprehensive exam option: Students must complete six more credits of approved electives. In addition, the students must pass a comprehensive examination over the graduate program. This examination may not be taken until after midterms in the last semester of coursework.

Program Total: 36 credit hours

Masters in Special Education with a Concentration in Gifted and Talented Education

Required core: 12 credit hours

SPED 5010 Diagnosis of Exceptional Child (3)

SPED 5/6500 Seminar in Special Education (3)

SPED 6120 The Special Education Program (3)

SPED 6750 Organization & Administration of Special Education (3)

Required Research Methodology Courses: 6 credit hours

GNED 6050 Statistics for Educators (3)

EDUC 6100 Educational Research Interpretation (3)

Required concentration courses: 12 credit hours

SPED 5120 Foundations of Gifted Education (3)

SPED 5140 Instructional Strategies for Gifted Education (3)

SPED 5160 Instructional Planning & Curriculum Gifted Ed (3)

SPED 5180 Twice Exceptional & Gifted Student (3)

Concentration Total: 12 credit hours

Program Total: 36 credit hours

Students receiving their SPED Masters and Concentration in Gifted and Talented Education will complete their comprehensive/oral examinations (6 hours) instead of a thesis or field study. It is a requirement to have completed Mild/Moderate and Severe Exceptionalities SPED 5100 and SPED 5200 to cover the required content needed to teach Special Education.

Special Education Certificate Leading to Licensure
Please contact the School of Education for the licensure requirements from the State Department of Education.

Required Courses: 33-36 credit hours

EDUC 1120 Introduction to Teaching (3)

SPED 2110 Introduction to Special Education (3)

EDUC 1190 Field-Based 1(1)

EDUC 3510 Field-Based 2 (2)

EDUC 4440/5440 Technology in Education (3)

EDUC 4510 Field Based II Teacher Preparation Experience-Secondary (6)

OR

SPED 4340/5340 Practicum in Special Education (3)

RDED 4110/5110 Teaching and Diagnosis of Reading (3)

SPED 4010/5010 Diagnosis of Exceptional Child (3)

SPED 4100/5100 Curriculum & Methods for Students with Mild & Moderate Exceptionalities (3)

SPED 4200/5200 Curriculum & Method for Student Severe/Except (3)

SPED 4300/5300 Reading Instruction in Special Education (3)

SPED 4550/5550 Classroom Management (3)

Certificate total credit hours required: 33-36 credit hours

Facundo Valdez School of Social Work

Cristina Durán, LISW, Ph.D., Dean
Lora Shields Science Annex
Phone: 505-260-6183 or 505-426-2058
FAX: 505-454-3290
Email: duranc@nmhu.edu

www.nmhu.edu/socialwork

Accreditation
The Facundo Valdez School of Social Work has been accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) since 1978 and has been accredited through 2020.  The Facundo Valdez School of Social Work has been recognized by North Central Accreditation as an Academic School of Excellence.

Mission of the Facundo Valdez School of Social Work
The mission of the Facundo Valdez School of Social Work is to educate students to practice social work competently with the diverse, multicultural populations of New Mexico and the Southwest. This context of cultural and regional responsiveness informs the School’s creation and implementation of all its educational programs.

The School has a primary commitment to Hispanic and Native American peoples. Our curriculum grounds students in core professional social work values, skills and ethical principles, and provides a focused awareness and respect for cultural differences and how poverty affects the well-being of people in the region.

The New Mexico Highlands University Board of Regents approved, on December 17, 2015, a change in the name to the School of Social to honor the founder of the School, Facundo Valdez. 

Facundo Valdez School of Social Work at Las Vegas (Main Campus)
Box 9000
Las Vegas, NM 87701
Phone: 505-454-3563
FAX: 505-426-2058

Administration – School of Social Work at Las Vegas
Cristina Durán, Ph.D., LISW, Dean

Lawrence M. Montaño, MSW, Graduate Admission Coordinator

Faculty – Facundo Valdez School of Social Work at Las Vegas

Jeannette Baca, DSW, LMSW, jmbaca@nmhu.edu

Benjamin Bencomo, DSW, LISW, bbencomo@nmhu.edu

Elizabeth Massaro, MSW, Ed.D., bmassaro@nmhu.edu

Rebecca Moore, MSW, Ph.D., rmmoore@nmhu.edu

Dolores Ortega, MSW, Ed.D., ortegad@nmhu.edu

Debra Rodda, MSW, dkrodda@nmhu.edu

John Tourangeau, LADAC, LCSW, jtourangeau@nmhu.edu

Facundo Valdez School of Social Work at Albuquerque
5401 Indian School Rd. NE, Suite 100
Albuquerque, NM 87110
Phone: 505-260-6181
FAX: 505-896-6122

Administration – Facundo Valdez School of Social Work at Albuquerque

Cristina Durán, LISW, Ph.D., Dean

Joanne Martinez, Office Coordinator

Marian Najar, BSW, Academic Support Specialist

Faculty – Facundo Valdez School of Social Work at Albuquerque

Kevin Barnas, MSW, MPA, kbarnas@nmhu.edu

Judith Barnstone, MSW, Ph.D., jebarnstone@nmhu.edu

Kip Coggins, MSW, Ph.D., kcoggins@nmhu.edu

Emet Ma’ayan LCSW, emetmaayan@nmhu.edu

Amy Messex, LCSW, amessex@nmhu.edu

Raeann Rivera, MSW, reyna@nmhu.edu

Helen Robertson, MIRLS, hsrobertson@nmhu.edu

Tamara Thiedeman, LCSW, thiedman@nmhu.edu

Valerie Valles-Pedroza, MSW, vevalles@nmhu.edu

Madeleine Wilson, LCSW, mjwilson@nmhu.edu

Facundo Valdez School of Social Work Rio Rancho Center

See: School of Social Work at Albuquerque

NMHU at Higher Education Center (HEC), Santa Fe
1950 Siringo Road
Santa Fe, NM, 87505
Phone: 505-426-2126
FAX: 505-428-1147

Administration – NMHU at Santa Fe Higher Education Center

Jeannette Baca, DSW, LMSW, Faculty Adviser jmbaca@nmhu.edu

Elizabeth Massaro, Ed.D., Faculty Adviser bmassaro@nmhu.edu

See also: NMHU SSW at Las Vegas

NMHU at San Juan College (SJC)
4601 College Boulevard
Farmington, NM 87402
Phone: 505-566-3552
FAX: 505-566-3584

Administration – NMHU at Farmington
Rey Martinez, LMSW, Ph.D., Program Coordinator

Asia Lewis, Administrative Assistant

NMHU at Eastern New Mexico University – Roswell
PO Box 6000
Roswell, NM, 88202-6000
505.624.7458 FAX: 505.624.7454

Faculty – NMHU at ENMU – Roswell

Cassandra Carrillo, LCSW, Program Coordinator

Adjunct Faculty
Adjunct faculty are utilized at all of the program locations to complement full-time faculty. These faculty members offer students the benefit of their professional experience and enhance the social work curriculum by assisting students in integrating classroom knowledge with social work practice.

Master of Social Work Program (MSW)

During the first year of the program, students are required to take a total of 31 credit hours of generalist social work practice courses. The first-year curriculum and courses provide students with an overview of the social work profession’s historical evolution, including an introduction to the body of social work knowledge, values, and ethical principles. In addition, the curriculum addresses the areas of research, policy, and practice knowledge and skills required of all practicing social workers. Working with a diverse, Hispanic and American Indian population has particular emphasis throughout the curriculum.

During the first year, students apply generalist social work knowledge in a field practicum setting under the supervision of a licensed social work professional. The social work courses, combined with field practicum, afford students the opportunity to apply classroom knowledge in working with individuals, families, groups and communities within a specific agency setting.

Area of Concentration/Specialization
During the second year, students take courses in an area of concentration. The required courses build upon the first-year foundation courses, providing students with specific course content and depth in a specific area of social work practice.

The three areas of concentration offered include: clinical practice; leadership and administration; and bilingual/bicultural clinical practice. The clinical practice concentration, leadership and administration, and the Dual Degree MSW/MBA are offered at all sites.

NMHU in Albuquerque offers all concentrations including, bilingual/bicultural clinical practice. The Substance Abuse Focus is also offered a s complement to the clinical practice concentration only at the Albuquerque location.

Students admitted to the MSW program are admitted into one of the three areas of concentration and take courses outlined in the program of study. All social work courses at all program locations use the same course syllabi and textbooks, which ensures continuity of content across all sites.

Students admitted to a specific program location that does not offer their preferred area of concentration may request to transfer during their second year to another NMHU program location.  A transfer to any of the program locations may be requested at any time during the student’s academic enrollment with the approval by the school dean.

MSW/MBA Dual Degrees Program:
The Facundo Valdez School of Social Work (FVSSW), in collaboration with the School of Business, Media, and Technology, offers a joint program of study leading to the completion of two separate degrees, one in Social Work (MSW) and one in Business Administration (MBA). Students interested in pursuing both degrees must be first admitted to the two-year social work program, with a concentration in Leadership and Administration concentration. Upon successful completion of the first year MSW curriculum, students must then apply for admission to the MBA program, with a concentration in Human Resource Management. Both degrees must be completed within five calendar years from date of admission. Students must meet the admission requirements of both schools. The dual degree program is offered at the NMHU FVSSW Albuquerque Location and to students at other locations through online synchronous and asynchronous course delivery.

Programs of Study
The MSW program prepares students for advanced social work practice in an area of concentration with the knowledge, skills, values and ethical principles necessary to practice with Hispanic, American Indian, and other diverse populations of New Mexico and the Southwest. The program prepares students at an advanced level to analyze and evaluate the role of the social work practitioner in the delivery of human services.

The school offers three types of admission programs to meet each student’s academic and personal needs. The three programs include: advanced standing, full time, and part time. Students MUST complete the MSW program within five academic years from the date of admission.

Advanced Standing (2-3 semesters). This program is limited to students with a recent BSW degree. Admission to this program is competitive and the number of students admitted varies among the following program locations:

  • NMHU FVSSW at Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NM
  • NMHU FVSSW at Albuquerque, Albuquerque, NM
  • NMHU FVSSW at Rio Rancho, Rio Rancho, NM
  • NMHU FVSSW at Higher Education Center, Santa Fe, NM
  • NMHU FVSSW at ENMU-R, Roswell, NM
  • NMHU FVSSW at SJC, Farmington, NM

The program is limited to individuals who have completed a Bachelor of Social Work degree from an accredited school of social work within five years from the date of enrollment. Students begin taking second-year courses, within an area of concentration.

Full-Time Program (4-5 semesters). The full-time MSW program is offered at:

  • NMHU FVSSW at Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NM
  • NMHU FVSSW at Albuquerque, Albuquerque, NM
  • NMHU FVSSW at Rio Rancho, Rio Rancho, NM
  • NMHU FVSSW at Higher Education Center, Santa Fe, NM
  • NMHU FVSSW at SJC, Farmington, NM
  • NMHU FVSSW at ENMU-R, Roswell, NM

Full-time and part-time enrollment is available at all program locations

Part-time program (7-8 semesters). Students may attend part-time at any of the following program locations:

  • NMHU FVSSW at Las Vegas, NM
  • NMHU FVSSW at Albuquerque, NM
  • NMHU FVSSW at Rio Rancho, Rio Rancho, NM
  • NMHU FVSSW at Higher Education Center, Santa Fe, NM
  • NMHU FVSSW at SJC, Farmington, NM
  • NMHU FVSSW at ENMU-R, Roswell, NM

The part-time program affords students the opportunity to attend classes during the day or evening and extend completion of the degree 3 to 5 years.

Admission Requirements
New Mexico Highlands University Facundo Valdez School of Social Work seeks to admit to its graduate programs candidates who demonstrate a personal and professional commitment to a career in social work, a readiness to pursue graduate education and a willingness to make a positive contribution in the lives of others. Candidates best suited for a career in social work must be motivated to work in the human services field, have demonstrated past academic potential, have good oral and writing skills, and have the interpersonal qualities to work with multicultural and diverse populations regardless of differences in social class, economic status, gender, sexual orientation, age, physical disabilities, ethnicity, and culture.

All applicants must apply for admission to the Facundo Valdez School of Social Work.

The requirements for admission to the graduate program and the Facundo Valdez School of Social Work include:

  • Bachelor’s degree from an accredited United States institution or proof of equivalent training at an institution outside the United States.
  • Grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale in the student’s major or upper-division courses (junior and senior-level courses) and in any graduate work completed.
  • Demonstrate a liberal arts education as part of the bachelor’s degree.

Application Information
Prospective students must apply online through the NMHU website. When applying, all applicants seeking admission to the MSW program must provide the following information in order for the application to be considered complete and eligible for review and consideration.

Information regarding the MSW program may be obtained from the School of Social Work at all program sites mentioned.

Facundo Valdez School of Social Work Graduate Application Criteria:

  • Online Application for Admission
  • Official transcripts from each postsecondary institution attended
  • Three reference forms (included in the MSW application packet)
  • Completion of liberal arts course requirements
  • Employment history
  • Volunteer service experience
  • Personal narrative statement
  • Application fee*

*A $50 nonrefundable application fee is required from applicants who will be enrolling at NMHU for the first time.

*A $35 nonrefundable application fee is required from applicants currently or formerly enrolled at NMHU.

*A $35 nonrefundable application fee is required from students submitting a second application if previously denied admission.

Application Deadlines
January 15th is the priority deadline for submitting application materials. The school will accept applications after this date but is not obligated to review applicant files that are not submitted by the January 15th deadline. Applicant files are not reviewed until all materials have been received. Early application is strongly encouraged.

Review and Admissions Process
Applications are reviewed and rated by an admissions committee made up of faculty members. Recommendations for admission are made to the school dean, who will notify students of admission or denial. Applications are competitively reviewed based on GPA, human services work and volunteer experience, professional references, academic and disciplinary history, and the quality of the responses to the questions in the School of Social Work application.

Admissions Status
Students who have a minimum of a 3.0 GPA are admitted as with regular status. Students may be admitted with less than a 3.0 GPA on a 4.0 scale, such students are admitted on provisional status with the requirement that the student must maintain a 3.0 GPA during the first semester (12 hours) of study. Failure to meet this requirement will result in a registration hold on the student’s account that will prevent the student from registering and enrolling in future courses. All applicants who apply by January 15th and are admitted will be notified in writing no later than May 30th. If a student’s application is complete and has met the January 15th deadline, earlier notification may be made.

Time Limits for MSW Degree Completion
All graduate students must complete the MSW program within five academic years from the beginning of the first semester of the first year. Students who do not complete the program within the required time may request a one-year extension. An additional extension of time will require the following:

  • Complete testing-out exams on all work completed prior to the last five years.
  • Obtain approval from the dean of the School of Social Work.
  • Obtain approval from the University Academic Affairs Committee.

Leave of Absence Policy
Students who do not register for courses for two or more consecutive semesters must reapply for the MSW program through the Office of Admissions and Recruitment. A new online application will be required including submission of the personal narrative, résumé, and professional references. 

Denied Applicants
Applicants not admitted may reapply for admission. Submission of a new application is required.

Deferred Admissions
Students admitted to the School of Social Work can defer the start date for a calendar year, without having to re-apply. Notification to the dean requesting deferral of a year must be submitted in writing. Deferred admissions cannot be granted for more than a year.

Admission to Advanced Standing Status
To be eligible for Advanced Standing status, applicants must have a Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) degree from a CSWE accredited program and must have completed the BSW degree within five years from the date of anticipated enrollment in the MSW program. A minimum of a 3.5 GPA is expected for admission into advanced standing. 

Admission of Transfer Students
Students requesting to transfer into the Facundo Valdez School of Social Work from another social work program must meet all the admission requirements and must be transferring from a CSWE accredited program. The School accepts no more than one full academic year of acceptable course credit from another institution towards the MSW degree. Transfer students must complete at least the equivalent of one academic year at NMHU. 

Admission Changes
Requirements for admission into the MSW program are subject to change. Please contact the School of Social Work for application information:

NMHU Facundo Valdez School of Social Work at Las Vegas
Office of Admissions
Attn: Lawrence M. Montaño, Admissions Coordinator
Box 9000
Las Vegas, NM 87701
Phone: 505-454-3310
FAX 505-454-3290
Email: lmmontano@nmhu.edu

Student Association
Students are encouraged to participate in the Graduate Social Work Student Association (GSWSA) and other university student associations. 

Student Stipends
The Facundo Valdez School of Social Work, in partnership with the Children, Youth, and Families Department (CYFD), offers stipends to students who wish to pursue a career in child welfare under the Title IV-E stipend program. All graduate level students are eligible to apply for the stipends. Students must conduct their field practicum with a CYFD office for one academic year.

Stipend recipients are required to take the SOWK 5000 Children’s Services course. The average stipend amount awarded to students is $12,000 per academic year. The amount is prorated for part-time students. Amount of stipend award is subject to change.

Upon completion of the MSW program, stipend recipients must work for CYFD for a period of 18 months for each academic year a stipend is received. Stipend application information is provided to all students at the time of admission notification. For more information about the Title IV-E Stipend program, please contact, Sharen Maldonado, Senior Administrative Assistant, at 505.426.2058, or email skmaldonando@nmhu.edu. 

Request for Change of Concentration
Students admitted into the advanced standing program cannot request a change of concentration once admitted into the program. Full-time and part-time students are strongly encouraged to remain in the area of concentration to which they are admitted. However, under special circumstances, a student may request a change of concentration. A change of major concentration form must be submitted to the dean of the Facundo Valdez School of Social Work prior to the completion of first year of study.

Advisement
A faculty adviser is assigned to students at the time they enroll in the program. Students must develop a program of study with the assistance of their advisor. 

Academic and Behavioral Expectations
All social work students are provided with a copy of the school’s conduct policy at the commencement of the academic year. The policy outlines expectations regarding students’ professional behavior and academic performance, sets forth grounds for suspension and expulsion from the social work program, and describes the procedures for disciplinary action. As more specifically detailed in the policy, students must demonstrate suitability for the profession of social work via appropriate and adequate classroom and field performance, ability to appropriately relate to colleagues and compliance with all other provisions of the academic/behavioral policy. All aspects of the School of Social Work’s conduct policy apply to all students enrolled in social work classes across all sites. The School’s policy concerning grade appeals is included in each course syllabi as part of the School of Social Work’s policies.

Code of Ethics
All students in social work are required to have knowledge of and adhere to the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics. 

Field Practicum/Internship
MSW students are required to complete a total of 928 hours of field practicum during the two years of the program either in concurrent or block placement. A total of 12 credit units are required during the two years of the program. The field practicum provides the opportunity to apply classroom knowledge in working with individuals, families, groups and communities within an agency setting. All practicum placements require the approval of the field education director/coordinator.

Concurrent field practicum is offered during the fall-spring or spring-summer terms. Students enrolled in a concurrent field practicum are placed with the same community agency for two days (16 hours per week) for two semesters. In addition, during the first semester, first year MSW students are required to take a field seminar course, designed to provide students with an opportunity to integrate classroom knowledge with their field practicum.

Block field practicum is only offered during the summer term. Students must complete all social work courses required for the concentration prior to beginning block placement. Students enrolled in block field practicum placement are placed with a community agency for five days, (40 hours per week) for approximately 12 weeks. First year MSW students must register for two field practicum courses and one seminar. Second-year MSW students must enroll in two field practicum courses. Field seminar is not required for second-year MSW students.

In the first-year field practicum, students are placed in a social service agency where they learn generalist practice methods working with individuals, groups, families, organizations, and communities. Students are required to develop specific learning objectives in consultation with their agency instructor and field consultant that incorporate and apply classroom knowledge to working with specific client groups or organizations. Part-time students begin their first-year practicum during the second year of study.

The second-year field practicum must be completed in the student’s chosen area of concentration.

Incomplete Grades
Incomplete grades in prerequisite courses must be completed prior to registering for the following semester. Students will not be permitted to continue until the incomplete (I) is removed from the official transcript. 

Grade Point Average
A student earning a grade of C in a semester is considered passing if the student earns a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale. 

Course Sequence Offerings
Courses are only offered once per academic year, fall and spring semesters. During the summer semester, students may take elective course requirements and/or register for summer block practicum with prior approval.

Master of Social Work Program (MSW)
During the first year of the program, students are required to take a total of 31 credit units of generalist social work practice courses. The first-year curriculum and courses provide students with an overview of the social work professions historical evolution, including an introduction to the body of social work knowledge, values, and ethical principles. In addition, the curriculum addresses the areas of research, policy, and practice knowledge and skills required of all practicing social workers. Working with a diverse, Hispanic and American Indian population has particular emphasis throughout the curriculum.

During the first year, students apply generalist social work knowledge in a field practicum setting under the supervision of a licensed MSW social work professional. Social work courses, combined with field practicum, afford students the opportunity to apply classroom knowledge in working with individuals, families, groups and communities within a specific agency setting. 

Concentration in Clinical Practice
The primary objective of the clinical practice concentration is to prepare students to work as direct service practitioners with individuals, families, groups and communities in New Mexico and the Southwest. The concentration permits students to develop effective practice skills through the integration of social work knowledge and theory. The curriculum builds upon the first-year foundation through courses in advanced practice methods. A multiple theoretical orientation is relied upon which recognizes the inter-relatedness of human problems, life situations and social conditions within multi-ethnic and multicultural populations of New Mexico and the Southwest.

The curriculum focuses on the analysis and synthesis of direct practice theories and interventions determined to be the most effective in improving the lives of ethnic minorities and other culturally diverse populations. Clinical practice services include intervening in crisis, identifying available community resources, short and long-term therapy and working as part of an inter-disciplinary team with other professionals. Students will be provided a broad awareness of social, cultural, and environmental conditions affecting clients. The skills developed in this concentration are clear communication, listening and interviewing skills, psychosocial assessment, formulation of treatment plans, and self-evaluation and research methods. The clinical practice concentration is offered at all program locations. 

Concentration in Bilingual/Bicultural Clinical Practice (Albuquerque campus)
The bilingual/bicultural concentration prepares students to be culturally and linguistically competent social workers to work directly with Spanish speaking populations of New Mexico and the Southwest. The curriculum immerses students in the Spanish language so they obtain necessary social work skills, values and ethical principles in order to serve monolingual Spanish speaking clients. The concentration prepares students for advanced practice through a unique bilingual/bicultural classroom setting and practicum placement whereby students are engaged in Spanish language application and interaction with peers, families and individuals. This concentration offers clinical skills and knowledge applicable to a wide variety of populations, with a special focus on serving Spanish speaking persons. Spoken Spanish is a focus; reading and writing is done in English. Certain classes are taught in Spanish-only. Conversational Spanish is required for this program. This concentration in only offered at the Albuquerque program location. All second-year concentration classes are offered in the evening. 

Substance Abuse Focus (Albuquerque campus)
The School offers students an opportunity to specialize in substance abuse assessment and treatment through the completion of the Substance Abuse Focus within the clinical concentration. This program is only offered at the Albuquerque location. The program focuses on preparing social work practitioners utilizing evidence-based substance abuse treatment modalities. The program is designed to address the shortage of licensed and credentialed substance abuse social workers in New Mexico.

Concentration in Leadership and Administration
The Leadership and Administration curriculum prepares students with the advanced skills and knowledge needed for effective, culturally competent practice with organizations and communities. This concentration provides advanced courses in needs assessment and program evaluation, in policy analysis and political advocacy, in economics, and in the development and administration of social services and the management of social service agencies. The coursework and field internships are designed to prepare students for research, grant writing, advocacy, community outreach, and organizational development and leadership to promote social welfare and social justice for the client systems and communities of New Mexico and the Southwest. 

MSW/MBA Dual Degree Program
The School of Social Work and the School of Business, Media, and Technology jointly offer students an opportunity to complete a master of social work (MSW) and a master of business administration (MBA) degree simultaneously. Students complete the MSW coursework for the Leadership and Administration concentration in two full-time academic years. Upon completion of the MSW, students may continue to complete the MBA degree in Human Resource Management by completing additional credit units of course work through the School of Business, Media and Technology. Students pursuing the Leadership and Administration concentration may additionally choose to apply to the MBA program at any time during their program of study. To be considered for the MBA program, they must submit an application and are encouraged to get started on the MBA program pre-requisites prior to the completion of their MSW degree. 

Admission Requirements:
Students interested in pursuing the dual degree program MUST meet the admission requirements for both professional schools. Students MUST complete business course pre-requisites before commencing with MBA core classes. 

Social Work
Master of Social Work

First-Year Required Courses

First Year: Foundation Curriculum

Students must complete all required 5000-level courses before proceeding to take second year 6000 level courses. The first-year required courses must be completed before proceeding into the area of concentration/second year course requirements.

Required courses: 31 credit hours

Courses must be completed within the first year of the program.

SOWK 5300 Evaluative Research (3)

SOWK 5320 Field Practicum 1 (3)

SOWK 5330 Law & Ethics in Social Work Practice (3)

SOWK 5340 Field Practicum 2 (3)

SOWK 5410 Social Policy & Services 1 (3)

SOWK 5460 Understanding Difference (3)

SOWK 5510 Field Seminar 1 (1)

SOWK 5650 Social Work Practice 1 (3)

SOWK 5660 Social Work Practice 2 (3)

SOWK 5850 Human Behavior & Social Environment 1 (3)

SOWK 5860 Human Behavior & Social Environment 2 (3)

Core Total: 31 credit hours

Second Year Required Courses for Concentrations

Second Year: Areas of Concentration

Concentration in Clinical Practice

Required courses: 24 credits

SOWK 6010 DSM for Clinicians (3)

SOWK 6330 Advanced Clinical Research (3)

SOWK 6320 Field Practicum 3 (3)

SOWK 6340 Field Practicum 4 (3)

SOWK 6440 Group Work (3)

SOWK 6520 Clinical Supervision (3)

SOWK 6650 Advanced Multicultural Practice 1 (3)

SOWK 6660 Advanced Multicultural Practice 2 (3)

Electives: 8 credit hours

Students are required to take 8 credit units of electives, which afford them the opportunity to enhance their area of clinical knowledge and skills. At least 4 credits of electives must be at 6000-level. The remaining 4 credits can be at the 5000 or 6000-level.

Second-Year Concentration Total: 32 credit hours

First Year Core Total: 31 credit hours

Program Total (Two Year Program): 63 credit hours

Substance Abuse Focus (Graduate: Albuquerque campus only)
Students must be admitted to and complete the requirements for the Masters of Social Work clinical concentration.

Required courses: 15 credit hours

SOWK 5280 Intro to Substance Abuse (2)

SOWK 6010 DSM for Clinicians (3)

SOWK 6200 Substance Use & Abuse (3)

SOWK 6320 Field Practicum 3 (3)

SOWK 6330 Adv. Clinical Research (3)

SOWK 6340 Field Practicum 4 (3)

SOWK 6350 Motivational Interviewing (1)

SOWK 6440 Group Work (3)

SOWK 6520 Clinical Supervision

SOWK 6590 Co-occurring Substance & Mental Disorders (3)

SOWK 6650 Adv. Multicultural Practice I (3)

SOWK 6660 Adv. Multicultural Practice II (3)

Focus Total: 15 credit hours

Concentration in Bilingual/Bicultural Clinical Practice

Required Courses: 32 credit hours

SOWK 6310 Advanced Qualitative Research (3)

SOWK 6020 DSM (Bilingual Practice) (3)*

SOWK 5120 Immigrant Rights (2)

SOWK 6320 Bilingual/Bicultural Practicum 3 (3)*

SOWK 6670 Advanced Bilingual Practice 1 (3)*

SOWK 6440 Group Work (3)

SOWK 6520 Clinical Supervision (3)

SOWK 6540 The Latino Family (2)

SOWK 6680 Advanced Bilingual Practice 2 (3)*

SOWK 6340 Bilingual/Bicultural Practicum 4 (3)*

Electives: 4 credit hours

Students are required to take four credit hours of electives, which afford them the opportunity to enhance their area of clinical knowledge and skills. Two (2) of these credits must be at 6000-level.

*Conversational Spanish is required.

Second Year Concentration Total: 32 credit hours

First Year Core Total: 31 credit hours

Program Total (Two Year Program): 63 credit hours

Concentration in Leadership & Administration

Required Courses: 32 credit hours

SOWK 6090 Political Economy (3)

SOWK 6250 Non-Profit Management (3)

SOWK 6300 Advanced Agency Research (3)

SOWK 6320 Field Practicum 3 (3)

SOWK 6340 Field Practicum 4 (3)

SOWK 6420 Advanced Social Policy (3)

SOWK 6510 Leadership & Supervision (3)

SOWK 6640 Organizational Theory (3)

Elective Courses: 8 credit units

Students are required to take eight credit units of social work elective courses offered during the fall and spring semesters of the second year. At least 4 credits of electives must be at 6000-level. The remaining 4 credits can be at the 5000 or 6000-level.

Second Year Concentration Total: 32 credit hours

First Year Core Total: 31 credit hours

Program Total: 63 credit hours

MSW/MBA Dual Degree Program

Required Social Work Courses:

SOWK 6250 Non-Profit Management (3)

SOWK 6090 Political Economy (3)

SOWK 6300 Advanced Agency Research (3)*

SOWK 6320 Field Practicum 3 (3)

SOWK 6340 Field Practicum 4 (3)

SOWK 6420 Advanced Social Policy (3)

SOWK 6510 Leadership & Supervision (3)

SOWK 6640 Organizational Theory (3)*

Elective Courses: 8 credit units

Total SOWK courses: 32 credit hours

MBA Courses
Contact School of Business, Media Arts and Technology for more information. Note that SOWK 6300 and 6640, along with SOWK 5330 Law and Ethics waive 3 courses/9 credits of MBA program requirements. (Similarly, BUSA 5000, as noted above, waives 3 credits of MSW program elective requirements, for a total of 12 credits counting towards both programs). Additional credits must be taken within the School of Business, Media Arts and Technology to complete requirements for the MBA.

Course Descriptions

Courses in Accounting (ACCT)

ACCT 5100. Accounting Technology (3); Fa
A study of computerized financial accounting technology using integrated accounting systems. Previous NMHU ACCT 510.

ACCT 5810. Accounting Systems (3) Fa
This course examines the formal accounting information system with emphasis on the application of general theory of information to the problem of efficient economic operations.  Previous NMHU ACCT 581.

ACCT 5890. Governmental Accounting (3); Sp
Principles and procedures in governmental and institutional units and fiduciaries. Previous NMHU ACCT 589.

ACCT 5920. Auditing (3); Sp
This course covers techniques of auditing procedures, with a focus on analyzing and successfully completing auditing cases. Previous NMHU ACCT 592.

ACCT 6050. Financial Accounting (3); Fa, Sp, Su
The organization and analysis of financial accounting information. Previous NMHU ACCT 605.

ACCT 6060. Managerial Accounting (3)
This course explores the use of cost information in evaluating past performance and planning future operations.

ACCT 6850. Financial Statement Analysis (3); Sp
The core objective of this course is to teach students how to read and interpret a firm’s 10-K filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). A firm’s 10-K filing is the most comprehensive, publicly available, and audited report of a firm’s financial and operating87 activities. Previous NMHU ACCT 685.

ACCT 6870. Advanced Accounting Topics (3); Sp
Advanced topics in accounting with emphasis on consolidated financial statements and partnerships. Previous NMHU ACCT 687.

Courses in Anthropology (ANTH) 

ANTH 5100. Method and Theory in Archaeology (3); Var
The purpose, techniques, methods and theory of archaeology in the study of the human past and in the context of modern science. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Previous NMHU ANTH 510.

ANTH 5110. People and Plants in Prehistory (3); Var
The question of subsistence is central to every archaeological inquiry. The specialized field of paleoethnobotany allows us to infer dietary habits from charred plant remains recovered during archaeological excavations. The purpose of this course, therefore, is to familiarize students with field methods employed in the recovery of botanical remains (samplings, flotation, capture, and drying) and lab methods used to identify and interpret them. Special emphasis will be placed on identifying wild and domestic plants used by prehistoric peoples of northeastern New Mexico. Previous NMHU ANTH 511.

ANTH 5120. Lithic Technology and Analysis (3); Var
The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the study of stone tools in archaeological contexts. We wish to learn from which materials these tools were made, the techniques that were employed to make them, and how they came to be discarded to become part of the archaeological record. We also wish to know from where the materials came and what properties caused them to be selected for the purpose of purposes for which they were chosen. Accordingly, the course is broken into four general areas: geology, technology, analysis, and interpretation. Previous NMHU ANTH 512.

ANTH 5130. Archaeology of the Southwest (3); 2, 2 Var
Study of prehistoric cultures (before 1500) of the American Southwest. Prerequisite: One course in introductory sociology or anthropology. Previous NMHU ANTH 513.

ANTH 5140. Field Methods in Archaeology (2 – 6 VC); Su
Instruction in Archaeology field and laboratory techniques and methods. Prerequisite: ANTH 1215 or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU ANTH 514.

ANTH 5150. Development and Socio-Cultural Change (3); Var
This course concerns the nature and consequences of development and culture change. The focus is on contemporary issues and many ways in which anthropology is used outside its purely academic context: how anthropology is applied to contemporary human issues, how it benefits society, and how it advances theoretical knowledge. Prerequisite: ANTH 1215 Intro to Phy Anth & Archaeology or permission of the instructor. Cross-listed as SOC 5150. Previous NMHU ANTH 515.

ANTH 5160. Ceramic Analysis (3); Var
The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with pottery-making in prehistoric contexts, the geology and petrography involved, stylistic and iconographic themes, and how to analyze a prehistoric ceramic assemblage. Accordingly, the course is divided into several general areas: geology and the mineralogical and chemical makeup of clays; history of ceramic manufacture and trade; technological production of pottery including clay sources, vessel properties, shape, form, function and design; and the uses of style in questions of social ties and affiliations. Prerequisites: ANTH 1140 and ANGH 1215.

ANTH 5180. Beliefs and Practices Among Southwest Native Americans (3); Var
This course provides an overview of Southwest Native Americans beliefs and practice. It will focus on the sacred ecology, mythology, world view, ritual and dance complex of a number of diverse tribes within the American Southwest. Southwest Native American and practices will be placed within the larger historical and contemporary social, political, and cultural contexts. Previous NMHU ANTH 518.

ANTH 5200. Anthropology Goes to the Movies (3); Var
The course will feature ethnographic films that explore cross-cultural themes about identities (race-ethnicity, nationality, political organization, religion, gender, class, sexuality, and so on) primarily through film and secondarily through ethnographic texts. Course readings, films, class lectures and discussions will examine the themes of cinematic (visual and auditory) manipulation of audience perceptions and interpretations, research and ethics and accountabilities, and the politics of ethnographic representation. You will learn about film in anthropology by viewing and discussing films that reflect various anthropological principles. Thinking about anthropology films will require talking and writing about the subject. Previous NMHU ANTH 520.

ANTH 5220. Magic, Witchcraft and Healing (3); Var
The origins, elements, forms, and symbolism of religion including a comparative survey of religious beliefs, myths, practices, and symbolism. Course focuses on religion in the context of culture with an emphasis on appreciating religious differences. Prerequisite: One course in introductory sociology or anthropology. Cross-listed as SOC 5220. Previous NMHU ANTH 522.

ANTH 5240. Violence and Society (3); Var
In this course, violence will be studied as a social phenomenon. The course includes general descriptions and theories of violence as well as considerations to reduce lethal and non-lethal violence in society. Pre-requisites: SOCI 1110 and ANTH 1140.

ANTH 5260. Gender, Food, and Culture (3); Var
This class takes interdisciplinary gendered perspectives to explore the ways that food behaviors and beliefs surrounding the production, distribution, and consumption of food, influence constructions of identity, femininity/masculinity, culture, sexuality, and reinforce and contest gender hierarchies. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110.

ANTH 5280. Comp Systems of Social Control (3); Fa
This course is a sociological and anthropological analysis of social control and law in a variety of social cultural, and global contexts. Previous NMHU ANTH 528.

ANTH 5290. Gender, Culture, and Society (3); Var
This course provides a foundation for understanding gender as expressed within and influenced by society. Cross culturally men and women are perceived as different, often as opposites. This perception can affect the quality of life, both on a structural level (in terms of wages earned, jobs held) and on an interpersonal level (in terms of expression of self/autonomy). Various theoretical perspectives are explored in order to understand why this perception of difference exists, how it translates into inequality and how it is learned. Previous NMHU ANTH 529.

ANTH 5350. Selected Topics in Anthropology (1 – 4 VC); Var
Course in a topic or topics in anthropology: may be repeated with a change of content. Previous NMHU ANTH 535.

ANTH 5420. Forensic Anthropology and Osteology (4); 3, 2 Var
Presentation and application of biological anthropology techniques in the identification of humans from skeletal remains. Previous NMHU ANTH 542.

ANTH 5540. Women and Globalization (3); Var
This course examines how women’s lives are shaped by globalization through the feminization of labor and migration, environmental degradation, Diaspora, sexuality, cultural displacement, and militarization. It explores the ways women have confronted these conditions as well as the possibilities and challenges of cross-border feminist coalitions. Previous NMHU ANTH 554.

ANTH 5560. U.S.-Mexico Immigration: Border Issues (3); Var
Socially and culturally, economically and demographically no international process has affected everyday life in the United States more than Mexican immigration. The course will examine the evolution, expansion and maintenance of processes and structures that have come to institutionalize the unspoken immigration “agreements” between these two nations. Previous NMHU ANTH 556.

ANTH 5610. Communication and Culture (3); Fa
Anthropological linguistics, focusing on investigations of the relationships between language and culture. Previous NMHU ANTH 561.

ANTH 5740. Contemporary Indian Issues (3); Var
An examination of emerging social and cultural issues in American Indian society today. Previous NMHU ANTH 574.

ANTH 5760. Indians of the American Southwest (3); Var
A survey of the Native American cultures in the Southwest since 1500, including both Pueblo and non-Pueblo cultures. Prerequisite: One course in introductory sociology or anthropology. Previous NMHU ANTH 576.

ANTH 5770. The Hispanic Southwest (3); Var
The ethno-historical and socio-anthropological examination of Spanish-speaking people in the Southwest from their establishment to contemporary times. Previous NMHU ANTH 577.

ANTH 5800. Issues in Applied Anthropology (3); Var
Course will focus on what applied anthropology is, how it is done, how it benefits society, and how it advances anthropology’s theoretical knowledge of culture and society. It is also a course for students who are interested in learning about the various ways in which anthropology is used outside the classroom. Previous NMHU ANTH 580.

ANTH 5810. Cultural Resource Management (3); Var
This course will provide the students with the foundations for conducting cultural resource management (CRM). It addresses laws, regulations, agencies, and techniques needed for conducting CRM work and practical experience. Prerequisite: One culture area course. Previous NMHU ANTH 581.

ANTH 6500. Seminar in Anthropology (1 – 4 VC); Var
Seminar course in a topic or topics in anthropology: may be repeated with change in content. Previous NMHU ANTH 650.

ANTH 6510. Seminar: Concepts of Human Culture (3); Var
This course will help acquaint students with the world of human cultures and to arrive at a means of understanding “culture” as well as theoretical constructs developed to examine the central concepts of anthropology. The place of anthropology in the western tradition; issues examined by anthropologists from an array of theoretical perspectives; examples from ethnographic studies; application to public issues and policies, are means through which theory will be brought to bear on praxis. Previous NMHU ANTH 651.

ANTH 6520. Seminar: Thesis Writing (1); Var
Instruct and facilitate students in empirical, historical, and theoretical research and in design, preparation, and completion of a thesis in anthropology. Previous NMHU ANTH 652.

ANTH 6900. Independent Study (1 – 4 VC); Var
Individual, directed study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU ANTH 690.

ANTH 6920. Independent Research (1 – 4 VC); Var
Independent research arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU ANTH 692.

ANTH 6940. Professional Paper (1 – 3 VC); Var
The professional Paper provides a unique opportunity for each student to bring together all of the course-work for the MA in Southwest studies – Anthropology Concentration into a practical application of socio-cultural phenomenon. Previous NMHU ANTH 694.

ANTH 6960. Ethnographic Research Methods (3); Var
The course addresses methods of data collection, coding, and analysis for ethnographic field work in Anthropology. Techniques include naturalistic and participant observation, structured and unstructured interviewing, field note taking and management, and other related qualitative data gathering approaches, some of which may be used in the development of quantitative instruments and analysis. Of continuing concern is the interplay between theoretical perspectives and the influence of selected data collection methodologies. Previous NMHU ANTH 696.

ANTH 6990. Thesis (1 – 6 VC); Var
Individual research and writing in preparation of a graduate thesis. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU ANTH 699. 

­­­­­­­­­­­­­Courses in Art (ARTS)

ARTS 5110. Mixed Media (3); Var
Acquisition of a wide variety of skills related to the processes of mixed media production.  A wide variety of media will be utilized and combined in a range of methods.

ARTS 5210. Painting 5 (3); 2, 4 Fa, Sp
This intermediate to advanced level course emphasizes personal imagery and the exploration of the language of paint. Previous NMHU ART 521.

ARTS 5220. Painting 6 (3); 2, 4 Fa, Sp
Continuation of ART 5210 with emphasis placed on an individual topic decided upon by both student and instructor resulting in a series of paintings and a research paper. May be repeated for additional credit. Prerequisite: ART 5210 or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU ART 522.

ARTS 5310. Ceramics 5 (3); 2, 4 Fa, Sp
Form building including kiln firing and glaze calculation. Course may be repeated for credit. Previous NMHU ART 531.

ARTS 5340. Practicum (1-4 VC); Fa, Sp, Su
Experience in an on-campus or work placement. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU ART 534.

ARTS 5350. Selected Topics in Art (1 – 4 VC); Var
Course in a topic or topics of art studio. May be repeated with a change of content. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU ART 535.

ARTS 5410. Sculpture 5 (3); 2, 4 Fa, Sp
A continuation of ARTS 3410, and an introduction to bronze casting. Prerequisite: ARTS 3410 or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU ART 541.

ART 5420. Sculpture 6 (3); 2, 4 Fa, Sp
Development of a personal aesthetic in sculpture. Course may be repeated for credit. Previous NMHU ART 542.

ART 5500. Seminar in Art (1–4 VC); Var
Seminar course in a topic or topics of art. Course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU ART 550.

ARTS 5610. Jewelry and Metalsmithing 5 (3); 2, 4 Fa, Sp
A continuation of ARTS 3610.

ARTS 5620. Jewelry and Metalsmithing 6 (3); 2, 4 Fa, Sp
A continuation of ART 5610. Prerequisite: ARTS 5610 or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU ART 562.

ARTS 5710. Printmaking 5 (3); 2, 4 Fa, Sp, Su
A continuation of ART 371 with emphasis placed on innovative technologies in intaglio, the art of the monotype, and advanced practices in lithography including color. Attention will be placed highly on individual imagery and outside research. Prerequisite: ARTS 3710 or permission of instructor.

ARTS 5720. Printmaking 6 (3); 2, 4 Fa, Sp, Su
Continuation of ART 5710 with emphasis placed on an individual topic decided upon by both student and instructor resulting in a suite or series of images in print, and a research paper. May be repeated for additional credit. Prerequisite: ART 5710 or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU ART 572.

ARTS 5850. Art Foundry 5 (3); 2, 4 Su
An emphasis on refining aesthetic knowledge and technical skills. Course may be repeated for credit.

ARTS 5860. Art Foundry 6 (3); 2, 4 Su
Continuation of ART 5850. Course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ARTS 3850 or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU ART 586.

ARTS 5900. Independent Study: Art Studio (1–4 VC); Fa, Sp
Individual research in a selected area of art history or criticism arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: The appropriate 3000-level course and permission of instructor. Previous NMHU ART 590.

ARTS 5930. Directed Study in Art Studio (1–4 VC); Fa, Sp
Advanced independent work arranged with a faculty member to expand upon knowledge and techniques gained in lower division studio courses in the student’s field of emphasis. Prerequisite: The appropriate 3000- or 4000-level course and permission of instructor. Previous NMHU ART 593.

ARTS 5950. Exhibit (1); Fa
This course parallels Senior Colloquium and is taken during the fall semester of the post-baccalaureate program. Students will complete a portfolio packet that will allow them to apply to M.F.A. programs and/or a professional career. Previous NMHU ART 595.

ARTS 5960. Exhibit Design (3); Sp
Students will participate in mounting a multimedia exhibit on a topic in Fine Arts. Previous NMHU ART 596.

Courses in Art History (ARTH) 

ARTH 5400. Modern Art (3); Sp
A survey of European and American art from the late eighteenth century until the present. Major artists and trends in painting, sculpture, photography and architecture will be discussed with particular emphasis on personality and innovation. Prerequisite: ARTS 411 or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU AH 540.

ARTH 5500. Seminar in Art History (1 – 4 VC); Sp
Seminar course in a topic or topics of art history. May be repeated with a change of content. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU AH 550.

ARTH 5800. Art History: The Americas (3); Fa
A survey of the arts of the Americas, covering the pre-Columbian indigenous cultures, Hispanic colonial presence, and contemporary Native American and Hispanic arts. Previous NMHU AH 580. 

Courses in Biology (BIOL) 

BIOL 5050. Bacterial Physiology (4); 3, 1 Var
This course covers aspects of the physiology and molecular biology of bacteria. The genetics, molecular structure and functional aspects of prokaryotic cells will be discussed. Bacterial metabolism will be studied, including energy production and use by aerobic and anaerobic microorganism. Concepts of cellular growth, biosynthesis and molecular genetics will also be addressed. Previous NMHU BIOL 505.

BIOL 5150. Biotechnology (4); 2, 4 Var
Introduces students to latest techniques in biotechnology with hands-on laboratories in recombinant DNA technology, bioinformatics, and molecular biology techniques used in genetic engineering, industrial microbiology, and agricultural biotechnology. A special fee is charged. Previous NMHU BIOL 515.

BIOL 5220. Plant Physiology (4); 3, 1 Var
The physiology of germination, growth, flowering, fruiting, and senescence in plants. Students interested in this course must be classified as a graduate student or permission of the instructor.

BIOL 5230. Molecular & Cell Biology (4); Sp
This course is a detailed exploration of basic cellular chemistry, macromolecules, cell structure and functions, and mechanisms and regulation of gene expression. The laboratory will explore eukaryotic cell biology using molecular biology techniques. Topics include DNA and protein structure and functions. Previous NMHU BIOL 523.

BIOL 5240. Molecular & Cell Biology Laboratory (1); Sp
This is the laboratory course to accompany BIOL 4230/5230. This lab is required of students that have satisfied the Molecular & Cellular lecture requirement but have not taken the laboratory portion. Previous NMHU BIOL 524.

BIOL 5250. Marine Biology (4); 3, 2 Fa, 3-yr cycle
Major groups of marine invertebrates and algae are observed and studied in their natural habitats. Students participate in a 10-day field trip during the spring break, with a transportation and room charge to be determined at the time of the class. Enrollment limited to 16. Previous NMHU BIOL 525.

BIOL 5270. Immunology (3); 3,0 Alt Fa even
This course studies diseases of vertebrates with emphasis on host-parasite interactions. The course includes principles of isolation, characterization, and control of pathogenic organisms as well as principles of vertebrate response to infection, antigen-antibody interaction, hypersensitivity, and auto-immune diseases. Previous NMHU BIOL 527.

BIOL 5320. Vertebrate Physiology (4) 3, 2 Var
Fundamental life processes in the vertebrates are covered in this course. Previous NMHU BIOL 532.

BIOL 5350 – 6350. Selected Topics in Life Science (1 – 4 VC); Var
Specialized course in exploring topic(s) in life science. May be repeated with change of content. Previous NMHU BIOL 535 – 635.

BIOL 5400. Conservation Biology (3); Alt, Sp, Odd
This course intends to familiarize the student with the major conservation issues of our time and encourage them to think critically about the different problems facing the planet as it moves into the future. This course analyzes the interrelationship between human activities and the environmental crisis and studies alternatives for the preservation of biodiversity. Through the use of case studies and primary literature, students will get a deeper understanding of the complexities associated with the conservation of biodiversity. Previous NMHU BIOL 540.

BIOL 5550. Wildlife Diseases (3); Var
An introduction to viral bacterial, and fungal diseases found in wildlife species. The diagnosis and management of the disease are explored. Previous NMHU BIOL 555.

BIOL 5570. Advanced Wildlife Management (3); Sp, 3-yr cycle
This course presents advanced wildlife management concepts and is intended for senior and master-level students that have already taken, or are currently enrolled, in ecology or wildlife management courses. This course addresses the different goals of wildlife management: control of exotic species, restoration of endangered ones and harvesting species via game hunting or commercial use. Students will be expected to master concepts of population control, community ecology, and methods used to analytically calculate population parameters. Previous NMHU BIOL 557.

BIOL 5590. Fundamental Principles of Laboratory Safety (1); Fa
This is an introduction to the principles of laboratory safety including the proper use of emergency safety equipment and personal protective equipment, instructions for the safe handling, labeling, storage and disposal of chemicals, and safety in the biology and physics labs. Emphasis will be placed on preparing science educators in safety procedures. Previous NMHU BIOL 559.

BIOL 5630. Nutrition (3); Var
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of animal nutrition and appreciation of the importance of nutrition in health and economics. Subjects to be covered will include digestive anatomy, physiology, and nutrition of various animal species. Previous NMHU BIOL 563. 

BIOL 5700. Comparative Animal Behavior (4); 3/2 Fa, 3-yr cycle
This course presents the basics of animal behavior and is intended for senior and graduate students that have already taken, or are taking, classes in evolution and ecology. The course spans from basic genetics of behavior to the learning and environmental-based issues within a comparative and evolutionary context. Students must understand the mechanisms and evolution of animal behavior. The topics we will explore include the history of the scientific study of behavior; tools and approaches used to study behavior; and the interrelationship with its ecological and evolutionary aspects. Previous NMHU BIOL 570.

BIOL 5720. Human Evolutionary Behavior (3); Sp, 3-yr cycle
This course intends to familiarize students with evolutionary forces that shape human behavior. This emergent field deals with evolutionary interpretation of human behavior including, group living, mating preference, kin and sexual conflicts, and habitat preference. Students are expected to understand and incorporate principles of evolutionary thinking in designing scientific questions and testable hypothesis about human behavior. This course is also called Evolutionary Psychology in other universities. Previous NMHU BIOL 572.

BIOL 5740. Tropical Ecology (3); Spa, 3-yr cycle
This course presents the basics of tropical ecology and is intended for senior or graduate students that have already taken, or are taking, classes in evolution and ecology. The course spans from basic definitions of tropics geographically, how basic ecological processes work under the particular conditions in the tropics. The course emphasizes the aspect related to the high diversity in the tropics in a comparative approach drawing from the students’ experiences in temperate systems. Previous NMHU BIOL 574.

BIOL 5750. Field Tropical Ecology (1-4 VC); Su, 3-yr cycle
This course presents the basics of tropical ecology and is intended for senior or graduate students that have already taken an upper level class of tropical ecology. This is a hands-on course where students are expected to learn the natural history of representative organisms of the system they study. The practical exam will involve knowledge of taxonomy of plants and animals as well as their ecology and role in the ecosystem. Students are expected to keep a field notebook with carefully noted observations of the ecosystem as well as notes of their field project. Previous NMHU BIOL 575.

BIOL 5760. Evolution (3); 3 Alt, Fa, Even
Evolution is studied in terms of molecular, Mendelian, and population genetics. Previous NMHU BIOL 576.

BIOL 5770. Macroevolution (3); Fa, 3-yr cycle
Macroevolution is the study of patterns and processes driving the diversity of species on earth. In this course, students will learn how patterns of phylogenetic diversity are distributed geographically, and through time, particularly in relation to conservation challenges in the 21st century. Students will analyze data to learn how processes of evolution influence diversity at and above the species level. Topics include: speciation, hybridization, diversity, coevolution, the extinction crisis, phylogenetics, phytogeography, biogeography, contemporary evolution and humans, and related topics. Previous NMHU BIOL 577.

BIOL 5810. Developmental Biology (4); 3, 2 Fa, 3-yr cycle
This course investigates cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate animal development. Topics include fertilization cleavage, gastrulation axis specification, organogenesis, morphogenesis, and stem cells. Laboratory sessions focus on experimental manipulations of early invertebrate and vertebrate embryos and emphasize student-designed research projects. Previous NMHU BIOL 581.

BIOL 5850. Endocrinology (4); 3, 2 Alt, Spa, Even
This course reviews the embryological origin, histological structure, and function of the endocrine glands. Individual organs, the hormones that it produces, and how its function may be integrated at the systemic and cellular level will be examined. Endocrine topics are presented with “real world” examples and in a comparative manner among species. Prerequisites: BIOL 5320 or equivalent or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU BIOL 585.

BIOL 5870. Histology (4); 2, 4 Alt, Sp, Odd
This course covers microanatomy and functional organization of basic tissues: epithelium, connective tissue, cartilage, bone, muscle, and nerve. The course covers the histology of the blood and lymph vascular systems, glands, and secretion, especially in humans. Prerequisite: BIOL 5320 or equivalent or permission of instructor. A special fee is charged. Previous NMHU BIOL 587.

BIOL 5880. Soil Ecology (4) 3, 2 Var
Soil as a habitat, including chemical and physical properties of soil, classification of soils, soil organisms (emphasis on soil fungi and bacteria), and nutrient cycling. Prerequisite: Graduate status or permission of the instructor. 

BIOL 5890. Molecular Evolution and Ecology (4); 3/2, Sp, 3-yr cycle
Molecular ecology explores the application of molecular techniques to attain a deeper understanding of ecological systems. Themes of evolutionary and ecological theory, behavioral ecology, genetics, phytogeography, and conservation genetics will be covered. Application-based content will include molecular identification techniques for individuals and species, landscape and population genetics, hybridization, genomic methods for ecology, and measuring adaptive variation. Technical applications will include data analysis using current software in the field. Previous NMHU BIOL 589.

BIOL 5930. Field Botany (2); 1, 2 Var
Qualitative and quantitative techniques of community analysis, including floral sampling techniques for estimating population demographic patterns are covered in this course. The taxonomy and natural history of representative groups of land plants are studied in the field. Previous NMHU BIOL 593.

BIOL 5940. Field Zoology (3); 0, 6 Alt, Fa, Odd
This course covers the qualitative and quantitative techniques of community analysis, including faunal sampling techniques for estimating population demographic patterns. The taxonomy and natural history of representative groups of land animals will be studied in a field setting. Previous NMHU BIOL 594.

BIOL 5980. Applied Biological Research (1-4 VC); Fa, Sp
In this capstone course students participate in a research project where they have the opportunity to apply the results of their college preparation. Each class will conduct research toward a biological hypothesis or question chosen by the instructor. Each student will investigate a specific aspect of the broader question culminating with the preparation of a poster, presentation, and/or paper. Students will participate in an applied hands-on research project generating original data that they will compile, analyze, and communicate their results. Previous NMHU BIOL 598.

BIOL 6000. Research Methods in Life Science (3); 3 Fa
This is an introduction to research methods in life science. Topics covered include libraries as research tools, introduction to statistical inference. Previous NMHU BIOL 600.

BIOL 6100. Environmental Physiology (3); Sp
An advanced physiology course that integrates functional adaptations of organisms to aquatic and terrestrial environments. Physiological responses of organisms to environmental extremes and contamination will be discussed. Previous NMHU BIOL 610.

BIOL 6200. Advanced Topic in Biology (2); 2 Fa, Sp
This course is in-depth consideration of a specific topic of interest to faculty and the graduate student population. Subject matter will vary from semester to semester, and the course may be repeated for credit. Previous NMHU BIOL 620.

BIOL 6300. Advanced Microbiology (3); 3, 0 Var
Advanced concepts of the physiology and molecular biology of microorganisms are covered. The genetics, molecular structure and functional aspects of prokaryotic cells will be discussed. Emphasis will be given to energy and biosynthetic metabolism in aerobic and anaerobic microbes. The role of prokaryotic organisms in global elemental cycles and how they sense and respond to their environment will also be covered. Previous NMHU BIOL 630.

BIOL 6400. Advanced Molecular and Cell Biology (3); 3 Sp
This course covers advanced concepts of molecular and cellular biology. The genetics, molecular structure, and functional aspects of eukaryotic cells, both in isolation and as part of multicellular systems, will be discussed. Prerequisite: BIOL 5320 or equivalent or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU BIOL 640.

BIOL 6500. Graduate Seminar in Life Science (1); Fa, Sp
Seminar presentations on current topics in life science. May be repeated for credit. Previous NMHU BIOL 650.

BIOL 6890. Advanced Ecology (3); Fa
This course is an integrative one that connects knowledge students are expected to have in different fields. This course provides students with a comprehensive theoretical tool kit–tools needed to better understand ecological process and to make predictions about future changes and their ecological consequences. Students will write a review paper about a topic of their choosing. Previous NMHU BIOL 689.

BIOL 6900. Independent Study (1 – 4 VC); Fa, Sp, Su
Independent study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU BIOL 690.

BIOL 6920. Independent Research (1 – 4 VC); Fa, Sp, Su
Independent research arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU BIOL 692.

BIOL 6990. Thesis (1 – 7 VC); Fa, Sp, Su
Individual research and writing in preparation of a graduate thesis. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU BIOL 699.

Courses in General Business (BUSA)

BUSA 5000. Principles of Business Administration (3); Fa, Sp, Su
This is a proficiency course for new MBA students who have a bachelor’s degree in a field other than business. Students must take BUS 500 in their first semester. The course covers the Common Professional Components (CPC) of an undergraduate bachelor of business degree and includes the fundamentals of accounting, business ethics, business integration, strategies managements, finance, business leadership, global dimensions of business, legal environment of business, macroeconomics, microeconomics, marketing, quantitative research techniques and statistics. Previous NMHU BUS 500. 

Courses in Business Law (BLAW) 

BLAW 6390. Law and Ethics in Business (3); Fa, Sp, Su
A study of legal and ethical concepts that influence and guide business activity in the United States. Previous NMHU BLAW 639.

Courses in Chemistry (CHEM) 

CHEM 5190. Chemistry Laboratory 7 (3); 0, 6 Alt, Sp
Chemical instrumentation laboratory uses modern separation, purification, and instrumental analysis techniques including such techniques as NMR, GC-MS, FT-IR, fluorescence, HPLC, capillary electrophoresis (CE), X-ray diffraction (powder and single crystal XRD) and electrochemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 3210 or 3220 are required; CHEM 3170 and CHEM 3720 are recommended. Previous NMHU CHEM 519.

CHEM 5350 – 6350. Selected Topic in Chemistry (3); Var
Course in topic or topics in chemistry. May be repeated with change of content. Previous NMHU CHEM 535 – 635.

CHEM 5410. Reaction Mechanisms (3); Var
This course covers theoretical organic chemistry including molecular orbital theory, photochemistry, orbital symmetry, and reaction mechanisms. Previous NMHU CHEM 541.

CHEM 5420. Synthetic Chemistry (3); Var
This course is an advanced treatment of synthetic organic and in- organic chemistry and reaction mechanisms. Previous NMHU CHEM 542.

CHEM 5500-6500. Seminar in Chemistry (1 – 3 VC); Fa, Sp
Seminar course in a topic or topics in chemistry. Previous NMHU CHEM 550 – 650.

CHEM 5550. Chemistry Research Seminar (1); Fa, Sp
Graduate students participating in a chemical research project will make one or two 30- minute presentations on their project to faculty members and other graduate and undergraduate students registered in the course. In addition, the students will participate in the discussion evolving from other students’ presentations. Previous NMHU CHEM 555.

CHEM 5590. Fundamental Principles of Laboratory Safety (1); Fa
This course is an introduction to the principles of laboratory safety including the proper use of emergency safety equipment and personal protective equipment, instructions for the safe handling, labeling, storage and disposal of chemicals, and safety in the biology and physics labs. Emphasis will be placed on preparing science educators in safety procedures. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU CHEM 559.

CHEM 5610. Inorganic Chemistry 1 (3); Alt, Fa
This course covers quantum mechanical approach to chemical bonding, crystal and ligand field theory, acid/base theories, and transition metal chemistry. Previous NMHU CHEM 561.

CHEM 5620. Inorganic Chemistry 2 (3); Alt, Sp
This course is a continuation of CHEM 561. Topics include metal, transition metal, and non-metal inorganic topics and symmetry as related to spectroscopy and reaction mechanisms. Prerequisite: CHEM 5610. Previous NMHU CHEM 562.

CHEM 5730. Chemical Kinetics (3); Var
This course is an in-depth study of chemical reaction kinetics. Previous NMHU CHEM 573.

CHEM 5810. Biochemistry 1 (3); Fa
An introduction to the chemistry of biologically important molecules, including proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids; physical properties, mechanisms of action, and enzyme kinetics. Prerequisites or corequisites: CHEM 3420. Previous NMHU CHEM 581.

CHEM 5820. Biochemistry 2 (3); Sp
This course is a continuation of CHEM 5810. Prerequisite: CHEM 5810. Previous NMHU CHEM 582.

CHEM 6210. Advanced Analytical Chemistry (3); Var
This course is an in-depth treatment of chemical equilibria involving topics in acid/base, solubility, electro-chemistry, complexion reactions, and the theory of separations. Previous NMHU CHEM 621.

CHEM 6710. Chemical Thermodynamics (3); Alt, Fa
This course is an in-depth study of chemical thermodynamics. Previous NMHU CHEM 671.

CHEM 6720. Quantum Chemistry (3); Alt, Sp
This course is an in-depth study of spectroscopy and quantum mechanics. Previous NMHU CHEM 672.

CHEM 6900. Independent Study in Chemistry (1-4 VC); Fa, Sp, Su
Independent study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU CHEM 690.

CHEM 6910. Chemistry Colloquium (1); Fa, Sp
Students and faculty discuss current research problems. May be repeated for credit. Course must be taken twice to fulfill program requirement. Previous NMHU CHEM 691.

CHEM 6920. Independent Research in Chemistry (1-4 VC); Fa, Sp, Su
Independent research arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU CHEM 692.

CHEM 6990. Thesis (1 – 8 VC); Fa, Sp, Su
Individual research and writing in preparation of a graduate thesis. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU CHEM 699. 

Courses in Computer Science (CS)

CS 5110. Computer Programming for Educators (3); Fa, Sp
This is an in-depth study of the BASIC and LOGO programming languages, two of the most popular computer programming languages for use in the educational environment. This course will have a strong pedagogic component, and all students will develop lesson plans for teaching computer programming in the secondary school. Previous NMHU CS 511.

CS 5120. Scripting Languages (3); 2, 2 Fa, Sp
This course is an introduction to high-level scripting languages. This course uses script programming to teach the basic ideas of programming and to introduce the object-oriented paradigm. It does not, however, teach the complexities of a standard third-generation language. It is meant as an introduction for students who wish to understand programming principles without learning the details. Previous NMHU CS 512.

CS 5140. The C++ Programming Language (3); 2, 3 Fa, Sp
This course is an in-depth study of the C++ programming language. The significant features of the language will be discussed with special emphasis on those that relate to object-oriented programming. Previous NMHU CS 514.

CS 5150. JAVA Programming (3); 2, 2 Fa
This course is an introduction to object-oriented programming language. Numerous programs will be written to exercise the material covered. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU CS 515.

CS 5160. Advanced Computer Programming with Data Structures (3); 2, 3 Sp
This course explores the principles of software engineering, including debugging and testing, string processing, internal searching and sorting, simple data structures, recursion, and object-oriented programming. In addition, students explore how to best teach the material. Prerequisite: CS 5140 with a C or better or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU CS 516.

CS 5180. Multimedia Programming (3); 2, 2 Fa, Sp
This course is an introduction to programming multimedia applications. Numerous programs will be written to exercise the material covered. Prerequisite: Programming experience and permission of instructor. Previous NMHU CS 518.

CS 5210. Advanced Data Structures and Algorithm Development (3); Fa, Sp
This course is an investigation of computer data structures with an emphasis on the design and development of efficient algorithms for solving a wide variety of common computing problems. The course also covers the analysis and measurement of the performance of algorithms. Prerequisite: Grades of at least C in CS 3450, CS 3500, and MATH 3170. Previous NMHU CS 521.

CS 5250. Computer Hardware Installation and Maintenance (1); 0, 2 Fa, Sp
This course is a practical investigation of the processes involved in the installation and debugging of complex computer hardware systems including disk controllers, sounds and graphic boards, communication hardware, and various peripherals. Students will work on their own and in teams to build computer systems. Previous NMHU CS 525.

CS 5260. Computer Software Installation and Maintenance (1); 0, 2 Fa, Sp
This course is a practical investigation of the processes involved in the installation of complex computer software, including operating systems, communication packages, and Windows®-based programs. Students will work on their own and in teams to both prepare computers for installation and actually install a wide range of computer software. Prerequisite: CS 5250 or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU CS 525.

CS 5270. UNIX and Systems Administration (1); 0, 2 Fa, Sp
This course is a hands-on introduction to the UNIX operating system with an emphasis on system administration and networking. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and knowledge of at least one other operating system. Previous NMHU CS 527.

CS 5280. C and UNIX (3); 3, 0 Fa, Sp
This course explores C programming language and system programming on UNIX and LINUX™ operating systems. Prerequisite: CS 5270 or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU CS 528.

CS 5310. Database Management (3); 3, 0 Fa, Sp
This course explores the development of the major types of database systems, providing the framework for some experience with at least one database model. Assignments will include accessing, updating, and organizing a database. The use of a relational model will be emphasized along with various database inquiry systems, including natural language-like systems. Prerequisite: CS 5160 with a minimum grade of C or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU CS 531.

CS 5320. Advanced Database Management (3); Fa, Sp
This course is an investigation into advanced topics in information management and retrieval. The focus of the course may change from year to year. Some example topics that may be taught include multimedia databases, building digital libraries, relational or object-oriented implementation, building database-driven websites, text and image information retrieval, and data mining. Students will be expected to read and report on research literature related to the course topic. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU CS 532.

CS 5350. Selected Topics in Computer Science (1 – 4 VC); Fa, Sp
Course in a topic or topics in computer science. May be repeated with change of content. Previous NMHU CS 535.

CS 5360. Human-Computer Interaction (3); 3, 0 Fa, Sp
This course investigates theory and practice in human-computer interaction. Students will study the impact of human perception and cognition on user interface design and learn to use tools for building graphical user interface (GUIs) and speech interfaces. In addition, each student will design and implement a user interface. Prerequisite: CS 5160 with a minimum grade of C or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU CS 536.

CS 5420. Computer Systems Architecture (3); 3, 0 Fa, Sp
This course acquaints the student with the way a computer works internally. Topics to be covered include basic logic design, data coding, parity generation and detection, number representation and arithmetic, and computer architecture. Prerequisites: CS 3410 and CS 5160 with a minimum grade of C or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU CS 542.

CS 5430. Operating Systems (3); Fa, Sp
This course is a study of the concepts associated with the modern operating system. Topics will include supervisors, command processors, device drivers, interrupt handlers, queue managers, resource managers, memory allocation schemes, process activation and control, and timesharing or multitask control. Prerequisite: CS 3410. Previous NMHU CS 543.

CS 5510. Software Engineering (3); Fa, Sp
This course is a study of the concepts and techniques of software engineering. Emphasis will be object-oriented design principles, the integration of systems analysis methodologies into software engineering, and topics such as formal specifications and proof of program correctness. Prerequisite: CS 3500.  Previous NMHU CS 551.

CS 5550. Computer Graphics (3); Fa, Sp
This course provides an introduction to the applications and basic techniques involved in the general field of computer graphics. The course will be a combination of surveying the different hardware and software used in graphic systems and of implementing some basic graphic algorithms. Students will have access to SGI hardware and software. Prerequisite: CS 5160 or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU CS 555.

CS 5560. Internet Services (3); 2, 2 Fa, Sp
This course is an introduction to telecommunications and the Internet. This course introduces the use of Internet for both research and problem solving. Students will be expected to develop tools for enhancing and accessing the Internet. Previous NMHU CS 556.

CS 5570. Computer Networks (3); Fa, Sp
This course is a study of the major concepts of computer networks and data communications. Topics discussed will include data communication networking, computer communications architectures and protocols as well as applications including local area networks (LAN) and wide area networks (WAN). Cross-listed as: MIS 5200. Previous NMHU CS 557.

CS 5580. Network Management (3); Fa, Sp
This course explores the application of networking concepts related to the management of LANs. Includes topics related to repair, setup, management and maintenance of LANs. Prerequisite: CS 5570, MIS 5200 or experience with computer networks, with permission of instructor. Previous NMHU CS 558.

CS 5590. Network Security (3); Fa, Sp
This course addresses security issues for TCP/IP-based and NT networks, access control and communications security. Prerequisite: CS 5570, MIS 5200, or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU CS 559.

CS 5610. Programming Languages (3); Fa, Sp
This course is a comparative study of programming languages and their features. The course develops an understanding of the organization of programming languages, especially the run-time behavior of programs. Students will gain experience with a variety of languages. Prerequisite: CS 2450 and one other programming language course. Previous NMHU CS 561.

CS 5620. Compiler Design (3); Fa, Sp
This course is a formal treatment of programming language interpreter, translator, and compiler design concepts. Topics include lexical analysis, parsing, code generation, and code optimization. Emphasis will be on the theoretical aspects of parsing context-free languages, translation specifications, and machine-independent code improvement. Programming projects that demonstrate various concepts will be assigned. Prerequisite: CS 5610. Previous NMHU CS 562.

CS 5630. Web Programming (3); 2, 2 Fa, Sp
This course is an introduction to programming on the Internet. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU CS 563.

CS 5640. Network Programming (3); Fa, Sp
This course extends the students’ knowledge and practice in analysis, design, and programming of computer networks. Prerequisites: CS 2450 and CS 5280. Previous NMHU CS 564.

CS 5710. Artificial Intelligence (3); Fa, Sp
This course is a general introduction to the theories and problems involved in the development of computer-based intelligence systems with specific emphasis on knowledge representation and search. The focus will be on artificial intelligence research that provides information for the understanding of human intelligence and on application research in areas such as expert systems, natural language systems, and intelligent computer-aided instruction. Previous NMHU CS 571.

CS 5720. Cognitive Science (3); Fa, Sp
This course is an interdisciplinary investigation of the foundations of human knowledge representation and understanding, the functioning of the human mind, and how these impact on recent computer technologies. Cross-listed as: PSY 5720 and Phil 5720. Previous NMHU CS 572.

CS 5730. Artificial Neural Networks (3); Fa, Sp
This course examines basic neurobiology, neural networks, single neuron models, single-layer perceptrons, multi-layer perceptrons, radial basis function networks; committee machines; Kohonen networks, and applications of neural networks. Prerequisites: Previous NMHU CS 573.

CS 5740. Machine Learning Algorithms (3); Fa, Sp
This course studies different machine learning techniques/paradigms, including decision trees, neural networks, genetic algorithms, Bayesian leaning, rule learning, and reinforcement learning. The applications of these techniques to problems in data analysis, knowledge discovery and data mining are discussed. Previous NMHU CS 574.

CS 5750. Image Processing (3); Fa, Sp
The course provides mathematical foundations and practical techniques for digital manipulation of images such as preprocessing, segmentation, Fourier domain processing, and compression. Previous NMHU CS 575.

CS 5760. Animation and Visualization (3); Fa, Sp
Computer-based graphical representations, or visualizations, or scientific processes and phenomena have become commonplace in scientific communities. For example, geologists like to visualize plate tectonics; meteorologists like to visualize weather systems; and computer scientists like to visualize algorithms. After briefly surveying the use of visualization in scientific communities, this course pursues an in-depth investigation of its theoretical underpinnings, from the three diverse perspectives: the cognitive perspective, the social perspective, and the cultural perspective. Prerequisites: CS 2450, MATH 3200. Previous NMHU CS 576.

CS 5770. Parallel and Distributed Programming (3); Fa, Sp
This course introduces algorithms and techniques for programming highly parallel computers. Topics covered include trends in parallel and distributed computing; shared address space and message passing architectures; design issues for parallel algorithms; converting sequential algorithms into equivalent parallel algorithms; synchronization and data sharing; improving performance of parallel algorithms; interconnection network topologies, routing, and flow control; and latency limits on speedup of algorithms by parallel implementations. Design, coding, performance analysis, debugging and other aspects of parallel algorithm development will be covered. Previous NMHU CS 577.

CS 5900. Independent Study (1 – 4 VC); Fa, Sp
Independent study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU CS 590.

CS 5920. Independent Research (1 – 4 VC); Fa, Sp
Independent research arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU CS 592.

CS 6000. Principles of Media Arts and Computer Science (3); Fa
This course is an interdisciplinary investigation of the terminology, roots, assumptions and principles that underlie the merging disciplines of computer science, mass communications, and design studies. Cross-listed as: MART 6000. Previous NMHU CS 600.

CS 6100. Synthesis of Media Arts and Computer Science (3); Sp
This course is an interdisciplinary synthesis of the principles that underlie the merging disciplines of computer science, mass communications, and design studies. Cross-listed as: MART 6100. Previous NMHU CS 610.

CS 6200. Multimedia Project Development (3); Fa
This course is a study of the processes, techniques, and tools used in the development of sophisticated multimedia-based projects. The course focuses on both the theoretical and practical aspects of multimedia design and programming. A key component of the course is the completion of a project that combines the various tools and techniques discussed in the course. The course will also involve student presentations on the research related to their thesis or project. Prerequisites: CS or MART 6000 or 6100. Previous NMHU CS 620.

CS 6350. Selected Topics in Computer Science (3); Fa, Sp
Course in a topic or topics in computer science. May be repeated with change of content. Prerequisite: CS 5350 in the same topic area. Previous NMHU CS 635.

CS 6500. Seminar: Project Development (1); Fa, Sp
This course is a seminar that focuses on the process of writing a thesis or project with specific emphasis on literature search. Students will propose a topic and develop an annotated bibliography using as many different search modalities as possible.

CS 6510. Seminar: Literature Review and Methodology (1); Fa, Sp
This course is a seminar that focuses on the process of developing a formal thesis/project proposal as well as writing the first and second chapters of a thesis or project. Prerequisite: CS 6500. Cross-listed as: MART 6510. Previous NMHU CS 651.

CS 6520. Seminar: Interdisciplinary Reports (1); Fa, Sp
This course is the presentations by students of their process on their thesis or project. The focus will be on interdisciplinary presentations that allow students from one discipline to understand a subject from another discipline and on the development of collaborative efforts. Prerequisite: CS 6510. Cross-listed as: MART 6520. Previous NMHU CS 652.

CS 6970. Field Project (1 –6 VC); Fa, Sp
Individual field research and writing in preparation of a graduate field project (equivalent to a thesis). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU CS 697.

CS 6990. Thesis (1 –6 VC); Fa, Sp
Individual research and writing in preparation of a graduate thesis. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU CS 699.

Courses in Criminal Justice Studies (CJUS)

CJUS 5160. Organized Crime (3); Var
This course is an in-depth examination of organized crime. Emphasis is placed on the theories of organized crime, the social, political, and historical evolution of organized crime, the principal forms of organized criminal activity, and efforts to investigate, control and prosecute organized crime. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110.

CJUS 5180. Reproductive Justice (3); Var
This class examines the reproductive justice theoretical framework, its history, origins, and conceptualization to explore its practical applications for transformative feminist activism and theorizing. Reproductive justice developed as a multi-layered theoretical paradigm and model for theorists/activists concerned about issues surrounding reproductive dignity. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110.

CJUS 5240. Violence and Society (3); Var
In this course, violence will be studied as a social phenomenon. The course includes general descriptions and theories of violence as well as considerations to reduce lethal and non-lethal violence in society. Prerequisites: SOCI 1110 and ANTH 1140.   

Courses in Counseling and Guidance (COUN)

COUN 5350 – 6350. ST: Selected Topic in Counseling and Guidance (1 – 4 VC); Var
Course in topic or topics in counseling and guidance. May be repeated with change of content. Previous NMHU COUN 535-635.

COUN 6000. Theories and Practice of Counseling (3); Fa, Sp
This course provides an overview of the history, such as legislation, government policy and philosophy of the counseling profession and its specialty areas. The roles, setting, delivery modalities and functions of all professional counselors, certification and responsibilities, public policy, standards and their relationships with human service and integrated behavioral health care systems are addressed. Legal and ethical aspects of professional counseling including ethical decision-making models will be addressed. Additional topics include benefits of membership in professional counseling organizations; current labor market trends in relation to credentialing bodies; the impact of technology on the profession; advocacy; strategies for personal and professional self-evaluation; implications for practice; and, the importance of self-care strategies for the counselor.  Previous NMHU COUN 600.

COUN 6010. Professional Counseling Orientation and Ethical Practice (3); Fa, Sp
This course covers ethical standards and an overview of the history of counseling, such as legislation, government policy and philosophy of the counseling profession and its specialty areas. The professional roles, setting, delivery modalities and functions of counselors including those in specialty areas are discussed. The role of certification and licensure and related responsibilities, public policy, standards and their relationships with human service and integrated behavioral health care systems are addressed. Additional topics addressed include benefits of membership in professional counseling organizations, current labor market trends in relation to credentialing bodies, the impact of technology on the profession, strategies for personal and professional self-evaluation and implications for practice and the importance of self-care strategies for the counselor. Previous NMHU COUN 601.

COUN 6020. Counseling Children and Adolescents (3); Sp, Su
This course provides knowledge and skills necessary to provide developmentally appropriate therapeutic interventions for children, adolescents and their families. Topics include characteristics, risk factors, and warning signs of students at risk for mental health and behavioral disorders; common medications that affect learning, behavior, and mood in children and adolescents; and, signs and symptoms of substance abuse in children and adolescents as well as the signs and symptoms of living in a home where substance use occurs. Interventions to promote academic development and techniques of personal/social counseling along with ethical and legal considerations regarding minors and families will be examined throughout the course. Prerequisites: COUN 6000 and COUN 6010. Previous NMHU COUN 632.

COUN 6030. Career Development (3); Fa, Sp
This course reviews theories and models of career development, counseling and decision-making. Students will learn approaches for conceptualizing the relationships among and between work, mental wellbeing, relationships, and other life roles and factors. They will develop processes for identifying and using career, avocational, educational, occupational and labor market information resources, technology, and information systems. Students will develop strategies for assessing abilities, interests, values, personality and other factors that contribute to career development; career development program planning, organization; advocating for diverse clients’ career and educational development and employment opportunities in a global economy; and facilitating client skill development for career, educational, and life-work planning and management.  Previous NMHU COUN 603.

COUN 6050. Essential Interviewing and Process in Counseling.  (3); Fa, Sp
This course serves as the student’s first formal exposure to essential interviewing, counseling and case conceptualization skills to aid students in developing a personal model of counseling. As such, it will introduce the student, within a safe and controlled setting, to the dynamics and process of the counselor’s role, including core counseling skills, structure of the interviewing, and counselor characteristics. Prerequisites: COUN 6000 and COUN 6010. Previous NMHU COUN 605.

COUN 6070. Group Counseling Theory and Practice (3); Fa, Sp
This course introduces students to theory and principles of group dynamics as well as developmental stages of groups. In addition, group members’ roles and behaviors and therapeutic factors of group work will be discussed. Students will have the opportunity to apply these principles through role-playing, participating as group members in an experiential component of this course as well as designing, planning, leading, and co-leading group sessions for diverse client populations. Prerequisites: COUN 6000 and COUN 6010. Previous NMHU COUN 607.

COUN 6080. Assessment and Testing (3): Fa, SP
This course includes the history and effective methods of conducting ethical and culturally sensitive assessments and testing in the field of counseling for individuals and groups relevant to career, educational, personal, and social development. It will include assessments of suicidal risk, harm to self and others, trauma and abuse, and mandatory reporting. Students will explore statistical concepts, including reliability, validity, scales of measurement, measures of central tendency, indices of variability, shapes and types of distributions, and correlations. Norm-referenced and criterion-referenced standardized data information gathering methods will be explored. A variety of assessment measures such as environmental assessments, behavioral observation checklist, personality, and psychological testing will be discussed to assist in diagnosis developmental, behavioral, and mental disorders. Previous NMHU COUN 608.

COUN 6090. Voc Assessment/Trans Assessment (3); Fa, Sp
This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the theories of learning, normal and abnormal personality development, and individual and family development from conception to late adulthood. The focus is on the biological, neurological, and physiological factors that affect human development and behavior, including the theories and etiology of addiction and co-occurring disorders. Systemic and environmental factors that affect human development, functioning, and behavior will also be addressed as well as the effects of crisis, disasters, and trauma on diverse individuals across the lifespan. In addition, classifications of pharmacological drugs will be discussed with an emphasis on appropriate medical referral and consultation with mental health providers. The course provides a general framework for understanding differing abilities and strategies for differentiated interventions. Emphasis will be placed on ethical and culturally relevant strategies for promoting resilience and optimum development and wellness across the lifespan. Previous NMHU COUN 609.

COUN 6100. Assessment and Treatment Planning (3); Sp, Su
This course explores the way counselors frame and diagnosis difficult and problematic human behavior and characteristics. It begins with an exploration of the historical, philosophical, and scientific foundations of the field’s primary diagnostic framework, the DSM. It discusses the strengths and limitations of that framework and the reasons it is important for counselors to understand and master that framework. The course then explores the ways counselors use the DSM framework to provide diagnoses of clients and prepare treatment plans based on those diagnoses. The discussion of treatment plans also provides an overview of how various psychopharmacological treatments are used to treat various DSM diagnoses and the strengths and limitations of such treatments. Learning tools include reading, discussion, simulated client presentations and explorations of how those presentations might be diagnosed using the DSM framework. Previous NMHU COUN 610.

COUN 6110. Cultural Diversity and Social Justice (3); Fa, Sp
This course is designed to provide a basic foundation of knowledge, awareness, and skills needed for providing more effective counseling services in a multicultural society. The course will cover theories, research, and practices associated with multicultural competence, social justice and advocacy with emphases on pluralistic characteristics within and among diverse groups nationally and internationally and the intersections of race, ethnicity, gender, religion, sexual orientation, country of origin, disability, and socioeconomic status. Students will be introduced to topics including oppression and privilege, racism, discrimination, sexism, power, and ageism. Previous NMHU COUN 611.

COUN 6120. Mental Health Ethics, Law and Practice (3); Fa, Su
This course will introduce students to professional, ethical and legal issues that affect the practice of counseling. Ethical decision-making, understanding and applying ethical codes and laws, and opportunities to develop critical thinking skills will be emphasized and practiced throughout the course. Course will include lecture, experiential activities, discussion, role-plays, and group work. Previous NMHU COUN 612.

COUN 6140. Existential Counseling (3); Su
This course is designed to give the student an in-depth understanding of the principles and techniques of existential counseling. Existential counseling is defined as both a theoretical orientation and a practical approach to working with individuals and their problems with everyday living. Attention is given to the application of existential principles to culturally diverse populations. It is also seen how existential counseling responds to current needs for more brief forms of counseling. The overall approach includes the development of understanding through personal reflection. Previous NMHU COUN 614.

COUN 6150. Family and Couples Counseling (3); Fa, Su
This course will provide an introduction to the basic concepts and principles of family and couple therapy. The emphasis is on understanding family and other systems theories, the structure and function of marriage/domestic partnerships, and models of family and systemic interventions. Considerations from a historical perspective are presented along with current developments within marriage/domestic partnership and family systemic models. Issues include evaluation of families, diagnosis in a family context, interviewing strategies, redefining problems in a family systems context, and treatment principles. Prerequisites: COUN 6000 and COUN 6010. Previous NMHU COUN 615.

COUN 6160. An Overview of Art Therapy and the Creative Process (3); Var
This course will extend over two weekends and will be an experiential journey into the unconscious. It will provide an opportunity through exercises using art, movement, music and imagery to experience ourselves more deeply and learn to apply the creative process in our work with clients. We will learn the origin of Dynamically Oriented Art Therapy, use Gestalt Art Therapy to explore our sub-personalities, discover archetypes and enact a fairy tale using Jungian Art Therapy and investigate our expanded consciousness through the Human Potential Movement and contact with our High Self. By doing our own inner work we will discover directly and profoundly the impact the creative process has on our own unconscious and how to hold and honor the psyche of the other. No experience in art or movement is necessary. Previous NMHU COUN 616.

COUN 6170. Art/Play Therapy/Sandtray Counseling (3); Var
In this class, we will explore the power of sandtray therapy with adults and children as well as art and play therapy for children. We will discover how these modalities can help to uncover the client’s therapeutic issues, learn about the materials needed and establishing a safe environment, explore the appropriate responses to make and questions to ask and the use of directive and non-directive approaches. Additionally, we will use sandtray experientially to deepen awareness of our own issues, contact our inner child through play therapy and experiment with fundamental techniques using art therapy to enhance our ability to connect with our clients in child therapy. Previous NMHU COUN 617.

COUN 6190. Issues in Clinical Mental Health Counseling (3); Sp, Su
This course is a study of the foundations, contextual dimensions and practice of clinical mental health counseling.  It will cover the history and development of clinical mental health counseling, and theories and models specific to CMHC.  Contextual dimensions in CMHC including roles and settings, etiology, nomenclature, treatment, referral, and prevention of mental and emotional disorders will be examined.  Mental health service delivery modalities within the continuum of care, such as inpatient, outpatient, partial treatment and aftercare and the mental health counseling services networks will be reviewed.  Students will examine legislation and government policy relevant to clinical mental health counseling.  They will learn about record keeping, third party reimbursement, and other practice and management issues in clinical mental health counseling.  In addition, students will explore strategies related to interfacing with legal systems and behavioral health care professionals while advocating for persons with mental health issues. Previous NMHU COUN 619.

COUN 6200. School Counseling P-12 (3); Sp, Su
This course provides knowledge and skills necessary for school counselors to implement a developmentally appropriate, comprehensive school counseling program.  Students learn school counselor roles as counselors, educators, leaders, advocates, members of multidisciplinary teams, and systems change agents in P-12 schools.  They will explore models of school counseling programs with a special emphasis on developing a RAMP (Recognized ASCA Model Program). They will explore core curriculum design, lesson plan development, classroom management strategies, and differentiated instructional strategies.  Students will learn interventions to promote academic development, techniques of personal/social counseling in school settings, and to discuss assessments specific to P-12 education.  Other topics include school-based collaboration and consultation. Previous NMHU COUN 620.

COUN 6210. Grief, Loss and Expressive Arts Therapy (3); Var
In this class, we will explore in a supportive environment our grief and how the experience of the Expressive Arts can allow the grieving process and healing to unfold. We will explore the stages of grief and the use of creativity for moving through these stages. We will experience our own issues of loss and how, through the power of art, movement and journaling, we can access our inner allies and begin to heal our own wounds. We will enact an ancient myth, discover our own ancestral work that may still need completing, discuss complicated grief, and learn to apply the Expressive Arts in working with our clients. As we move through our healing and contact our fullness we will be better able to assist our clients in their ability to touch their fullness as they move through their recovery. Previous NMHU COUN 621.

COUN 6220. Play Therapy (3); Var
This course focuses on training to be a therapeutic agent in the lives of children through the utilization of play therapy. Alt Su, even. Previous NMHU COUN 622.

COUN 6230. Foundations of Addiction: Alcohol Abuse (3); Sp
Foundation of Addictions – Alcohol Abuse is one of four courses focusing on Substance Abuse and Alcohol Abuse. These courses are in alliance with the requirement for licensure in New Mexico to obtain a license as the Licensed Alcohol and Drug Abuse Counselor (LADAC). The Foundation of Addictions – Alcohol Abuse covers: a) overview of alcohol abuse addictions, b) etiology models of alcohol abuse addictions, c) different populations effected by alcohol abuse addictions, and d) implications of alcohol abuse addictions. Previous NMHU COUN 623.

COUN 6240. Foundations of Addiction: Drug Abuse (3); Su
Foundation of Addictions – Drug Abuse is one of four courses focusing on Drug Abuse and Alcohol Abuse. These courses are in alliance with the requirement for licensure in New Mexico to obtain a license as the Licensed Alcohol and Drug Abuse Counselor (LADAC). The Foundation of Addictions – Drug Abuse covers: a) overview of drug abuse addictions, b) etiology models of drug abuse addictions, c) different populations effected by drug abuse addictions, and d) implications of drug abuse addictions. Previous NMHU COUN 624.

COUN 6260. Treating Individuals with Alcohol Abuse (3); Su
Treating Individuals with Alcohol Abuse Addictions is one of four courses focusing on Substance Abuse and Alcohol Abuse. These courses are in alliance with the requirement for licensure in New Mexico to obtain a license as the Licensed Alcohol and Drug Abuse Counselor (LADAC). Treating Individuals with Alcohol Abuse Addictions covers: a) overview of alcohol abuse treatments, b) DSM and ICD diagnoses of alcohol abuse verses alcohol dependence, c) responding to the needs of different populations of alcohol abusers, and d) implications for addictions counselors in regards to their treatment of individuals with alcohol abuse addictions. Previous NMHU COUN 626.

COUN 6270. Treating Individuals with Drug Abuse (3); Fa
Treating Individuals with Drug Abuse Addictions is one of four courses focusing on Drug Abuse and Alcohol Abuse. These courses are in alliance with the requirement for licensure in New Mexico to obtain a license as the Licensed Alcohol and Drug Abuse Counselor (LADAC). Treating Individuals with Drug Abuse Addictions covers: a) overview of drug abuse treatments, b) DSM and ICD diagnoses of drug abuse verses drug dependence, c) responding to the needs of different populations of drug abusers, and d) implications for addictions counselors in regards to their treatment of individuals with drug abuse addictions. Previous NMHU COUN 627.

COUN 6290. Trauma and Crisis Intervention (3); Fa, Su
This course explores the nature and experience of trauma and related crises and natural disasters. Multiple theories are explored regarding the effects of traumatic impact on the individual psyche. Theoretical constructs are analyzed, from a bioecological perspective, for their potential application in the area of trauma, crisis, and disaster; various examples of interventions and therapeutic techniques are examined for their usefulness in working with survivors of trauma. Previous NMHU COUN 629.

COUN 6310. Addiction Counseling Theory and Practice (3); Fa, Sp, Su
This course focuses on an overview of substance addictions and process addictions: a) history, b) etiology models of addictions, c) types of addictions, d) different populations and settings effected by addictions, e) treatment, f) evaluation, g) ethics, and h) policies related to addiction. Additional emphasis is placed on the unique needs and characteristics of person with disabilities as they interact with addiction and dependency. Previous NMHU COUN 631.

 

COUN 6330. College and Career Planning P-12 (3); Fa, Su
This course is intended to prepare students to design and implement a data-driven comprehensive college and career counseling program for students in the P-12 academic setting. To prepare students to become effective school counselors who will assume a primary role in helping their students become college and career ready, specialized information about college and career search resources, college admission and selection practices, and the financial aid process will be presented. Additionally, the role of the school counselor in facilitating school and postsecondary transitions, methods to improve promotion and graduation rates, and strategies to promote equity in student achievement and college access will be emphasized throughout the course. Previous NMHU COUN 633.

COUN 6340. Practicum in Counseling (3); Fa, Sp, Su
This course provides students their first supervised field experience. Students must complete 100 clock hours of supervised counseling practice of which 40 hours must be direct service to clients. Students must also receive 1 hour a week of individual or triadic supervision with their site supervisors and 1.5 hours a week of group supervision. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Pre-arrangement and permission of instructor.  COUN 6000, COUN 6010, COUN 6050. Previous NMHU COUN 634.

COUN 6350. Selected Topic in Counseling and Guidance (1 – 4 VC); Var
Course in topic or topics in counseling and guidance. May be repeated with change of content. Previous NMHU COUN 635.

COUN 6360. Restorative Justice and Conflict Resolution (3); Fa, Su
Conflict resolution skills can prove helpful where a lack of academic, social, and/or behavioral skills may lead to significant consequences for students in conflict, such as social isolation or academic decline. Conversely, students who exhibit competency in conflict resolution skills may be better able to adhere to the various academic and social demands as well as the peer norms. This course looks at school-based prevention models focused on conflict resolution, peer mediation, and other options for decreasing or resolving the incidence of peer conflicts. A particular emphasis is placed on examining the origins of interpersonal conflict and the most methods of communication used in effectively dealing with differences and managing conflict in the future. Previous NMHU COUN 636. 

COUN 6400. Foundations, Case Management, and Job Placement in Rehabilitation (3); Sp, Su
Foundations, case management, and job placement in rehabilitation acquaints the student with the legislative, historical, and philosophical roots of rehabilitation counseling in America. This course will present an introduction to the case management process and procedures used in counseling and human service settings. In addition, this course aims to enhance the ability of rehabilitation counseling students to develop and implement successful job placement strategies for people with disabilities. Topics covered include federal and local mandates for rehabilitation of individuals with disability, organizational structures to assist individuals with disability, screening, intake, orientation, assessment, treatment planning, counseling, case management, crisis intervention, job development, client education, referral, record keeping and consultation, as well as ethics and confidentiality. Current legislation and practice emphasizes participation, capabilities, adapting environments and building community for people with disabilities. Previous NMHU COUN 640.

COUN 6420. Case Management and Job Placement in Rehabilitation (3); Fa
The goal of Vocational Rehabilitation is most often to assist people with disabilities in job placement, i.e., preparing for employment, and obtaining and maintaining appropriate employment. This course is designed to provide the Rehabilitation Counseling student an overview of the job placement and case management functions of rehabilitation counseling, and to enhance the ability of rehabilitation counseling students to develop and implement successful job placement strategies for people with disabilities. Case Management is the process through which the rehabilitation counselor helps a single client enter and move through the vocational rehabilitation process, concluding with appropriate employment. The course addresses case management practiced in industry, public, and private settings, and provides knowledge of the managed care system. Practical experiences using a case development model will be provided. Previous NMHU COUN 642.

COUN 6460. Vocational Evaluation, Assistive Technology, and Transition Planning (3); Fa, Su
In this course students will learn about vocational evaluation, assistive technology and transition planning.  Students will learn how vocational evaluation is utilized in identifying and appraising an individual’s level of functioning in relation to vocational preparation and employment decision making and serves as an educational process in which an individual gains greater self and work knowledge through participation in work activities designed to evaluate vocational skills, interests, and abilities. Through this process individuals learn about the functional impact of their disability in relation to their career options. Vocational assessment is essential to school to career transition planning. Students will learn how transition plans built upon accurate, current, and relevant information are most likely to result in positive outcomes. Assistive technology will be addressed from high to low tech in addition to the impact of relevant legislation and regulations. Previous NMHU COUN 646.

COUN 6480. Advanced Vocational Evaluation (3); Var
The focus of this course is on advanced techniques in vocational evaluation including the use and development of work samples, portfolio development, functional vocational evaluation in transition, and the evaluation/use of assistive technology. Course work will cover current state and federal regulations affecting vocational evaluation and work adjustment practice. Previous NMHU COUN 648.

COUN 6490. Psychiatric Rehabilitation and Co-Occurring Disorders (3); Sp, Su
In this course students will learn about psychiatric rehabilitation concepts and principles, techniques, history, treatment settings and modalities; emphasizing issues central to mental health consumers such as empowerment, the consumer movement, family intervention, cross-cultural issues, recovery and reintegration within the community and the prevalence and impact of co-occurring disorders. Students will be introduced to the philosophical and empirical bases of psychiatric rehabilitation, including an overview of programming models, service-system issues, current research in psychological co-occurring disorders, and their treatment. Previous NMHU COUN 649.

COUN 6520. Death, Dying and Bereavement in Counseling (3); Var
Every counselor will inevitably be faced with clients who bring issues of death, dying or bereavement (DDB). These issues are likely to raise powerful emotions because they are issues that every counselor must eventually face in their own lives. This class combines experiential and didactic learning to help students understand how DDB issues may affect their clients, and how their own emotions about death and dying might affect their response to their clients. Prerequisites: COUN 6000, COUN 6010. Previous NMHU COUN 652.

COUN 6540. Sexuality in Counseling (3); Var
This course explores issues of human sexuality that counselors can expect their clients to bring in the counseling relationship and how counselors’ personal sexual attitudes and beliefs can affect the counseling relationship. These issues include, but are not limited to, sexual physiology, dominant culture sexual attitude, non-dominant culture sexual practice, gender and sexual identity, sexual abuse, sexuality across the lifespan, sexual issues in couples counseling, difficulties of sexual desire and functioning, sexual transference and countertransference. Prerequisites: COUN 6000, COUN 6010 or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU COUN 654.

COUN 6730/SPED 6730. Medical Aspects of Disability (3); Sp, Su
This course is an overview of human disability and medical terminology. It provides a review of human body systems, major disabling conditions and their implications for rehabilitation counseling. Previous NMHU COUN 673/SPED 673.

COUN 6740/SPED 6740. Psychocultural/Psychosocial Aspects of Disability (3); Sp, Su
This course provides an overview of psychosocial aspects of disability emphasizing emotional issues influencing the adjustment process of persons with disabilities. Previous NMHU COUN 674/SPED 674.

COUN 6900. Independent Study (1–4 VC); Var
Independent study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU COUN 690.

COUN 6920. Independent Research (1–4 VC); Var
Independent research arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU COUN 692.

COUN 6960. Professional Paper (1); Var
This course is designed to be a one semester hour course for those students who are finished with all their coursework but still need to do their Professional Paper. This will allow the students to be enrolled in the university as they complete their Professional Paper. A course like this is mandated by the university so that students can be enrolled when all other coursework has been completed. This is not a mandatory course unless the student needs to continue to be enrolled in the university but has no courses remaining to be taken. Previous NMHU COUN 696.

COUN 6970. Field Project (1–6 VC); Var
Individual field research and writing in preparation of a graduate field project (equivalent to a thesis). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU COUN 697.

COUN 6980. Internship in Counseling (1); Fa, Sp, Su
After successful completion of the practicum, students complete 600 clock hours of supervised counseling internship in roles and settings with clients relevant to their specialty area. Internship students complete at least 240 clock hours of direct service.  The internship is the final and most comprehensive professional experience in the counseling program. In order to ensure that the students’ individualized career goals are met in the internship experience, arrangements for the internship are negotiated between the student, the on-site supervisor and the student’s supervising professor at New Mexico Highlands University.  Minimum of 6 credits. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Pre-arrangement and permission of instructor.  COUN 6000, COUN 6010, COUN 6050, COUN 6070, COUN 6340. Previous NMHU COUN 698.

COUN 6981. Internship: Clinical Mental Health (3-6 VC); Fa, Sp, Su
The Clinical Mental Health Counseling internship is the final and most comprehensive professional experience in the counseling program. The intent of the internship is to provide the student with closely supervised training at a clinical mental health counseling site outside of the university environment. In order to ensure that the student’s individualized career goals are met in the internship experience, arrangements for the internship are negotiated between the student, the on-site supervisor and the student’s supervising professor at New Mexico Highland University.  Minimum of 6 credits. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Pre-arrangement and permission of instructor.  COUN 6000, COUN 6010, COUN 6050, COUN 6070, COUN 6340. Previous NMHU COUN 698.

COUN 6982. Internship: Clinical Rehabilitation (3-6 VC); Fa, Sp, Su
The Clinical Rehabilitation Counseling Internship is the final and most comprehensive professional experience in the counseling program. The intent of the internship is to provide the student with closely supervised training at a clinical and rehabilitation counseling site outside of the university environment. In order to ensure that the student’s individualized career goals are met in the internship experience, arrangements for the internship are negotiated between the student, the on-site supervisor and the student’s supervising professor at New Mexico Highlands University.  Minimum of 6 credits. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Pre-arrangement and permission of instructor.  COUN 6000, COUN 6010, COUN 6050, COUN 6070, COUN 6340. Previous NMHU COUN 698.

COUN 6983. Internship: Rehabilitation Counseling (3-6 VC); Fa, Sp, Su
The Rehabilitation Counseling Internship is the final and most comprehensive professional experience in the counseling program. The intent of the internship is to provide the student with closely supervised training at a rehabilitation counseling site outside of the university environment. In order to ensure that the student’s individualized career goals are met in the internship experience, arrangements for the internship are negotiated between the student, the on-site supervisor and the student’s supervising professor at New Mexico Highlands University.  Minimum of 6 credits. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Pre-arrangement and permission of instructor.  COUN 6000, COUN 6010, COUN 6050, COUN 6070, COUN 6340. Previous NMHU COUN 698.

COUN 6984. Internship: School Counseling (3-6 VC); Fa, Sp, Su
The School Counseling Internship is the final and most comprehensive professional experience in the counseling program. The intent of the internship is to provide the student with closely supervised training at a school counseling site outside of the university environment. In order to ensure that the student’s individualized career goals are met in the internship experience, arrangements for the internship are negotiated between the student, the on-site supervisor and the student’s supervising professor at New Mexico Highlands University.  Minimum of 6 credits. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Pre-arrangement and permission of instructor.  COUN 6000, COUN 6010, COUN 6050, COUN 6070, COUN 6340. Previous NMHU COUN 698.

COUN 6990. Thesis (1–6 VC); Var
Individual research and writing in preparation of a graduate thesis. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU COUN 699.

Courses in Early Childhood Multicultural Education (ECED)

ECED 5150. Principles of Early Childhood Multicultural Education (3); Fa
An in-depth study of the historical, theoretical, and philosophical development of early childhood education and its implications on current issues and problems. Previous NMHU ECME 515.

ECED 5240. Curriculum in Early Childhood Multicultural Education Programs (3); Sp
An in-depth study of various early childhood education curricula and the development and design of a curriculum guide. Previous NMHU ECME 524.

ECED 5280. Organizational Designs of Early Childhood Multicultural Education Prog. (2); Fa
Planning early childhood education programs for teachers, supervisors, administrators, and social workers. Previous NMHU ECME 528.

ECED 5290. Teaching the Perceptual Skills (2); Sp
The rationale, the techniques, and the sequence of teaching auditory, oral, visual, and psycho-motor skills prior to reading, writing, and arithmetic. Previous ECME 529.

ECED 5340. Practicum in Early Childhood Multicultural Education (1–4 VC); Var
Campus work placement with specific responsibilities over a sustained period of time. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU ECME 534.

ECED 5350. ST: Selected Topic in Early Childhood Multicultural Education (1–4 VC); Var
Course in topic or topics in early childhood education. May be repeated with change of content. Previous NMHU ECME 535.

ECED 5820. Early Childhood/Special Education (3); Su
Developing an awareness in educators concerning an understanding of children with or without special needs. Cross-listed as: SPED 5820. Previous NMHU ECME 582.

ECED 5920-6920. Independent Research (1–4 VC); Var
Individual, directed research arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU ECME 592-692.

Courses in Economics (ECON)

ECON 6080. Managerial Economics (3); Fa, Sp, Su
The course emphasizes the application of micro-economic theory to business management and strategy. Key course concepts include marginal analysis, prices and the allocation of resources, cost analysis, market structures, and information. Previous NMHU ECON 608.

ECON 6090. Political Economy (3); Var
Public economics is the study of government’s effect on the economy. The primary focus of this course is on the provision and financing of government services. Key concepts covered in the class include the cost of providing government services, pricing government services, cost-benefit analysis, intergovernmental finance, and tax theory and practice. Previous NMHU ECON 609.

Courses in Education (EDUC)

EDUC 5100. The Art and Science of Teaching in Secondary Schools (3); 3, 2 Fa
Designed to provide an overview of curriculum and organization in the secondary school and to offer actual teaching experience in a “micro-teaching” situation, applying basic teaching strategies and techniques for the purpose of developing teacher competency. A special fee is charged. Previous GNED 510.

EDUC 5120. Theories and Principles of Bilingual Education (3); Sp
Fundamental theories and principles of bilingual education, preparing the prospective teacher to address the issues and concerns intelligently in the classroom.  Previous GNED 512.

EDUC 5170. English as a Second Language (3); Fa, Sp
A study of English as a second language, conveying methods and procedures of teaching English to children and adults for whom English is not the native tongue. Students will be introduced to second language acquisition theories and basic elements of the sound system. It is highly recommended that RDED 4110 be taken prior to or concurrently with this class. Previous GNED 517.

EDUC 5200. Sheltered English for Content Area Instruction (3); Fa
This course provides pre-service and in-service teachers a set of linguistic, instructional, assessment and classroom-management practices that allows English language learners (ELLs) from the advanced-beginner level on to develop content-area knowledge, operational skills and increased language proficiency. Previous GNED 520.

EDUC 5220. Licensure Test Prep Language Arts & Writing (1); Fa, Sp
This course is designed to help students preparing to take the New Mexico Teacher Licensure test focusing on the Essential Academic Skills Assessment of reading and writing.  Previous GNED 522.

EDUC 5240. Licensure Test Prep Teacher Competency (1); Fa, Sp
This course is designed to help students preparing to take the New Mexico Teacher Licensure test focusing on the Professional Knowledge. Previous GNED 524.

EDUC 5260. Licensure Test Prep Math (1); Fa, Sp
This course focuses on the Essential Academic Skills Assessment and the Assessment of Math to help students preparing to take the teacher licensure test. This course is designed to be a review of the Pre-Algebra and Algebra I content covered on the Math section of the New Mexico Teacher Licensure test. Previous GNED 526.

EDUC 5350-6350. Selected Topic in Elementary Education (1 – 4 VC); Var
Course in topic or topics in elementary education. May be repeated with change of content. Previous ELEM 535-635.

EDUC 5360. Parent and Community Involvement (3); Fa
Development in prospective teachers and experienced educators of necessary attitudes and strategies related to involving parents and other community members in the educational process. Students will review the research which demonstrates the positive results from involving parents as partners in the child’s learning process. Previous GNED 536.

EDUC 5370. Instructional Methodologies for Use in Spanish/English Bilingual Classrooms (3); Fa
Demonstrate knowledge of and use theories, approaches, methods and techniques for teaching literacy, bi-literacy and other academic skills in English and the native language. Spanish is the language of instruction and student participation/presentations. Previous GNED 537.

EDUC 5400. Orientation to the Profession (2); Fa, Sp
This course provides an overview of teaching as a profession. Students will explore the requirements and responsibilities of becoming a culturally responsive professional educator. In addition, students will develop an understanding of working with diverse student populations including English Language Learners and Exceptional Learners. A variety of perspectives on education including historical, philosophical, legal, and ethical issues in a diverse society are also examined. Previous GNED 540.

EDUC 5410. Teaching Elementary School Science and Social Studies (3); Fa
Development of teaching strategies appropriate to recent innovations in science and social science teaching for multicultural classrooms. Laboratories will be offered in both English and Spanish, when possible, to provide opportunities for Spanish/English bilingual majors and other interested students to develop skills for teaching science and social science in Spanish. Previous ELEM 542.

EDUC 5420. Effective Teaching I (3); Fa, Sp
This course provides an in-depth overview of current educational learning theories and evidence-based classroom practices.  In this course, students will examine evidence-based practices that promote language development and foster student learning.  Student will also explore planning basics, engagement and motivation strategies, basics of classroom management, and understanding learners, family & community contexts in a diverse society.  Co-requisite EDUC 5400 Orientation to the Teaching Profession, and EDUC 5500 Seminar/Internship. Previous GNED 542.

EDUC 5430. Effective Teaching II
Effective Teaching II provides an overview of culturally responsive effective teaching and learning methods used to support learners in a diverse society.  In this course students will develop a teaching framework-grounded in theory, sound instructional practices, action research, and philosophical perspectives.  Students will apply culturally responsive instructional and differentiation strategies to support and address the needs of all learners including English Language Learners and exceptional learners.  Students will explore the use of educational technologies to support teaching and learning in the classroom.  Effective classroom management techniques that focus on and facilitate learning will also be explored.

EDUC 5440. Technology in Education (3); Fa, Sp
Provides teachers a working knowledge of the microcomputer and its specific applications in education. A special fee is charged. Previous GNED 544.

EDUC 5450. Knowledge of the Profession (3); Fa, Sp
Legal, ethical, career, and organizational issues related to education. Students will be given experiences to assist them in communicating effectively with different individuals involved in the educational process. Prerequisite: Complete all required coursework (major and minor) and admission to student teaching. Corequisite: Appropriate major Field-Based III experience. Previous GNED 545.

EDUC 5460. Curriculum Planning, Assessment and Evaluation I (3); Fa, Sp
This course provides an overview of instructional planning and the methods used to assess and evaluate diverse learners. In this course students will examine the methods used for planning, designing, developing, implementing and evaluating standards-based instruction. Students will identify and analyze the various forms of assessment used in schools to evaluate learner achievement.  Students will also explore the principles of classroom assessment, discuss achievement targets, and create assessment methods that are aligned with achievement targets. Effective methods for providing learner feedback are also discussed. An emphasis is placed on using culturally responsive, non-biased assessments to improve student outcomes. Previous GNED 546.

EDUC 5470. Essential Processes in Special Education (3); Fa, Sp
This course provides an overview of teaching and learning methods for exceptional learners in inclusive settings.  In this course students will explore special education law and its impact on educational practice. Students will discuss the characteristics and needs of exceptional learners.  Students will also explore effective methods for planning and implementing standards-based instruction, engaging and assessing learners, and using effective classroom management techniques in inclusive settings. An emphasis is placed in identifying ways to modify assessments, curriculum, and instruction for learners with IEP’s. Previous GNED 547.

EDUC 5480. Content Methods for Secondary; Fa, Sp
Content Methods for Secondary provides an overview of effective teaching and learning methods used to support secondary learners in a diverse society.  In this course, students will analyze the relationship between content knowledge and pedagogy.  Students will also explore effective methods for planning and implementing standards-based instruction, engaging and assessing learners, and using effective classroom management techniques.  Student will also develop interdisciplinary units for secondary learners.  An emphasis is placed on implementing culturally responsive instruction to address the needs of diverse student populations including English Language Learners (ELL’s) and exceptional learners. Previous GNED 548.

EDUC 5500. Internship I-IV (1); Fa, Sp
This internship seminar provides candidates with the opportunity for students to apply theory to practice. It is designed to prompt candidates to reflect on self, practice and what they have learned in the program. The internship seminar supports student via University Field Supervisors via frequent observations and review of suggested means to improve candidates in the development of their teaching practices. Candidates are evaluated via dispositional assessment and formal classroom dispositional assessment formal classroom observation and are able to engage in self – and peer evaluations. Candidates revisit work and finalize their statement in the final seminar. This includes a teacher reflection discussions per 8-week session. Previous GNED 550.

EDUC 5550. Classroom Management (3); Fa, Sp
Introduces the student to a variety of techniques for managing behavior in the classroom. Major areas and specific techniques within each will be presented and practiced both in the class and in the student’s own teaching situation. Prerequisite: Admission to student teaching and permission of instructor. Previous GNED 555.

EDUC 5610. Assessment and Evaluation of Students (3); Fa, Sp
Problems in the construction and use of teacher made and standardized tests. The course also emphasizes the gathering and interpreting of data, reporting or test information, and development of a district-wide testing program. Previous GNED 561.

EDUC 5900-6900. Independent Study (1–4 VC); Var
Individual, directed study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU GNED 590-690.

EDUC 5900-6900. Independent Study in Elementary Education (1–4 VC); Var
Individual, directed study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous ELEM 590-690.

EDUC 5920-6920. Independent Research (1–4 VC); Var
Individual, directed research arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU GNED 592-692.

EDUC 6190. Mathematics in the Elementary School (3); Fa
A detailed consideration of problems of elementary mathematics–what to teach, the grade placement of content, and the methods and materials of teaching. Previous ELEM 619.

EDUC 6210. Evaluation of Classroom Performance in Elementary School Mathematics (2); Fa
The use of teacher-made and standardized instruments to assess performance in elementary mathematics, diagnose areas of difficulty, and prescribe remediation. Previous ELEM 621.

EDUC 6220. Theory and Practice of Teaching Elementary School Mathematics (3): Sp
Current classroom practices in elementary mathematics related to the various theories of learning. Emphasis will be placed on current developments. Previous ELEM 622.

EDUC 6240. Advanced Techniques of Teaching Social Studies in the Elementary School (3); Sp
Exploration of the modern social studies curriculum with emphasis on research and curriculum development. Previous ELEM 624.

EUDC 6250. Science Education in the Elementary Grades (3); Fa
History of science education and methodology in the elementary school, with emphasis on current trends. Previous ELEM 625.

EDUC 6920. Independent Research in Elementary Education (1 – 4 VC); Var
Independent research arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous ELEM 692.

Courses in Educational Leadership (EDLD)

EDLD 5350 – 6350. ST: Selected Topic in Educational Leadership (1 – 4 VC); Var
Courses in educational leadership. May be repeated with change of content. Previous EDLD 535-635.

EDLD 6000. Instructional Leadership & Organizational Change (3); Fa, Sp
The purpose of the course is to assist school leaders with understanding the dynamics of organizations and how these dynamics affect organizational and student performance results. Focus will be given to understanding components of creating high performing environments, to include organizational theory application and the effects of organizational structure and design, human relations and behavior, culture and climate and the politics of the change process. Critical internal and external factors that affect organizational performance will be examined. Theory and leadership practices will be surveyed in the context of connecting leadership to organization change. Course objectives will address investigation into how organizational decision-making, management systems, change processes, technology, culture and behavior all play critical roles in addressing school improvement and student achievement. Previous EDLD 600.

EDLD 6110. Action Research in Education (3); Sp, Su
Action Research is a graduate level class addressing both educational research and school improvement. The aims of Action Research include a) development of the school leader’s knowledge and skills in applied research techniques and developing action research for implementation in classrooms and schools, and b) preparing school leaders for informed analysis and evaluation of research. Prerequisite: EDUC 610.  Previous EDLD 611.

EDLD 6150. School Finance and Resource Allocation (3); Fa, Sp, Su
Engaging school leaders in an intensive process that focuses on school financing in New Mexico is the purpose of this course. The content will include school-based budgeting, budget planning and development, budget management, financial adequacy and equity, sources of revenue and their intent, operations management, facility planning, food services, auxiliary services and the connection of resource allocation and accountability to school-level decisions. The effects of resource allocation with respect to instructional program and staffing needs will also be addressed. Previous EDLD 615.

EDLD 6200. Legal Issues for School Leaders (3); Fa, Sp, Su
The legal basis of public education will be the focus of this course. Constitutional, federal, state, tribal, local and tort law will be explored in terms of the application of ethical policies and procedures and the rights and responsibilities of school personnel and students, including special populations. State statutes, the public-school code and state regulations as they affect public education will also be studied with application to the daily operations of the school work environment and its delivery of services. Legal issues, which the school principals would encounter in hiring personnel, evaluating personnel, facilitating staff development for instructional personnel and dismissing personnel, will also be explored. Previous EDLD 620.

EDLD 6250. Educational Leadership and the Principalship (3); Sp, Fa
This course is a study of the nature, processes, and functions of leadership, developing skills in leadership, communication, improving instruction for student learning, and group development. This course focuses on the role of the principal as administrator in the public-school environment. It is designed to develop a broad understanding of the complex and ever-changing elements and responsibilities of leadership in today’s schools. Course content will cover strategies that will help the student in the development of a shared vision, the process of organizational change, creating professional learning communities, and generating a school culture of learning for all students. The needs of diverse school populations will be a focus of our study. Previous EDLD 625.

EDLD 6300. School Community Relations (3); Fa, Sp, Su
The course focuses on the relationships that are needed to build strong school and community partnerships. Students will be able to combine theory and practice (praxis) in improving their knowledge and skills related to connecting the schools with a larger community. Previous EDLD 630.

EDLD 6350. Selected Topics in Educational Leadership (3); Sp, Fa
Course in topic or topics in educational leadership. May be repeated with change of content. Previous EDLD 635. 

EDLD 6400. Instructional, Leadership, Supervision, and Evaluation (3); Fa, Sp
The course is designed to provide a knowledge of the roles and responsibilities of the school leader within the charge of supervision and evaluation. Students will reflectively examine their knowledge and sensitivity to the issues and relationships between effective leadership skills and the ability to develop the capacity of schools as culturally responsive learning communities for continual renewal. An emphasis on instructional leadership and the practical and human dimensions or supervision is studied in conjunction with current issues facing school leaders and schools. Course content will cover the strategies necessary to utilize staff supervision and evaluation as a process for professional growth. Supervision will be viewed in terms of capacity building, e.g., staff and career development, professional growth, coaching, mentoring, studying one’s own teaching and creating organizations in which learning, rather than power and control is the focus. Previous EDLD 640.

EDLD 6600. Data-Informed Instructional Leadership (3); Su, Fa
This leadership course is for graduate students who are contemplating pursuit of a career in K-12 educational leadership. The course is designed to enable school leaders to obtain, evaluate, and interpret data for informing school improvement. The course focuses on the ability to use an understand research and data systems in ways that contribute to school achievement and school productivity. Knowledge of educational leadership necessary for leading school improvement in diverse school setting in integrated throughout the course. Data-informed decision-making processes and communication of results, progress and involvement strategies to engage all stakeholders in the school involvement strategies to engage all stakeholders in the school improvement process are also addressed. This course is core requirement for the MA 1 or NM Licensure in Education Leadership. Previous EDLD 660.

EDLD 6800. Reflective Leadership (3); Sp, Su
In this capstone course, students will apply and combine knowledge, skills, and experiences obtained throughout the Educational Leadership sequence to define and develop their practice as responsive, reflective leaders in New Mexico schools. Each of three critical components––reading, reflection, and discussion––will be utilized to engage the student in identifying and clarifying her or his leader persona. Additional readings will be used to explicate application of standards and accountability measures toward leadership practice. Through the amalgam of analysis, interpretation, application, and synthesis of knowledge stemming from readings, class activities, and in particular autobiographic journaling, students will develop leadership portraitures. These multimedia constructs will offer deep and precise reflections of students’ perception of their leader-selves. Previous EDLD 680.

EDLD 6900. Independent Study (1–4 VC); Fa, Sp, Su
Independent study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous EDLD 690.

EDLD 6970. Field Project (1–6 VC); Fa, Sp, Su
Individual field research and writing in preparation of a graduate field project (equivalent to a thesis). Prerequisite: GNED 610 and permission of instructor. Previous EDLD 697.

EDLD 6980. Internship (1–6 VC); Fa, Sp, Su
This internship is a required two semester sequence (I & II, each 3-credit hours) for Education Leadership candidates in the Ma (for K-12 educators), or in the licensure-only option (for K-12 candidates currently holding a master’s degree). This lecture/lab course meets during each internship semester 5 times for 3 hours in a lecture format; additionally, each candidate completes 6 contact-hours of weekly supervised internship (lab) at his/her work location under the direction of a University supervisor and a qualified administrative mentor. Prerequisite for EDLD 698 is completion of a minimum of 12 credit-hours of required course work for the MA, or 6 credit-hours toward the licensure-only option. Prerequisite: completion of a minimum of 12 credit hours of required course work for the MA, or 6 credit hours toward the licensure only option. Previous EDLD 698.

EDLD 6990. Thesis (1–6 VC); Fa, Sp, Su
Individual research and writing in preparation of a graduate thesis. Prerequisite: GNED 610 and permission of instructor. Previous EDLD 699.

Courses in English (ENGL) 

ENGL 5000. Creative Writing: Experimental Fiction (3); Alt, Sp, Odd
This course examines advanced fiction writing with an emphasis on experimental techniques, styles, and approaches, including stream-of-consciousness and fictive autobiography. The reading component of this course will include theoretical and creative texts. Repeatable with a change of content. Previous NMHU ENGL 500.

ENGL 5010. Creative Writing: Advanced Poetry (3); Alt, Fa, Even
A writing workshop for experienced poets. Students will write original poems and read twentieth century poetry and poetics from the United States and around the world. Repeatable with a change of content. Previous NMHU ENGL 501.

ENGL 5020. Literary Theory (3); Sp
Intensive study of theories of literature from Plato to the present, with an emphasis on contemporary literary theory. Application of these theories to various works, ancient and modern. Previous NMHU ENGL 502.

ENGL 5050. Gender and the Politics of Literacy (3); Var
Exploration of the historical connections between literacy and reason/emotion, focusing on how each has been historically gendered. It begins with a history of style and how metaphors of gender have been used to describe writing. It includes a study of how cultural beliefs about literacy shape our conceptions of “individuality,” “citizenships,” “aesthetics,” “rationality,” and “originality,” and how those categories apply differently to men and women. Previous NMHU ENGL 505. 

ENGL 5100. Creative Writing: Creative Nonfiction (3); Alt, Fa, Odd
This course is a writing workshop that provides the background, theories, and methods for students to produce original creative nonfiction writing. The course emphasizes forms and practices of various sub-genres of creative nonfiction including the personal essay, the memoir, literary reportage, and the nonfiction novel. Repeatable with a change of content. Previous NMHU ENGL 510.

ENGL 5110. Major American Writers (3); Sp
In-depth study of a major author or authors, school, genre, and tradition in American literature. Possible topics include literature of the American West, American Modernism, and American poetry. May be repeated with change of content. Previous NMHU ENGL 511.

ENGL 5120. Major British Writers (3); Sp
In-depth study of a major author or authors, school, genre, or tradition of British literature. Possible topics: are Byron and the “Satanic School, “and The British Moderns (Lawrence, Woolf, Joyce). May be repeated with change of content. Previous NMHU ENGL 512.

ENGL 5140. Literary Realism (3); Var
Covers the international development of the theory and practice of the realist novel. Previous NMHU ENGL 514.

ENGL 5150. Methods of Tutoring and Teaching Writing (3); Fa
This course will prepare students to tutor and teach readers and writers at the college-level. Students will study composition theory and develop a course syllabus and materials for teaching a writing class. Students will also tutor college writers as part of their coursework. Previous NMHU ENGL 515.

ENGL 5210. Chaucer (3); Var
Intensive study of The Canterbury Tales and selected minor works. Previous NMHU ENGL 521.

ENGL 5220. Shakespeare (3); Fa
Intensive study of a group of Shakespeare’s plays, such as comedies, tragedies, Greek plays, English history plays, or late romances. May be repeated with a change of content. Previous NMHU ENGL 522.

ENGL 5230. Milton (3); Var
Intensive study of Paradise Lost and selected minor works. Previous NMHU ENGL 523.

ENGL 5340 – 6340. Practicum (1 – 4 VC); Fa, Sp
Students gain practical knowledge through internships in such areas as tutoring, editing, public relations, and feature writing. Previous NMHU ENGL 534 – 634. 

ENGL 5350. Selected Topic in English (1 – 4 VC); Var
Course in a topic or topics in English. May be repeated with change in content. Previous NMHU ENGL 535.

ENGL 5410. History of the English Language (3); Sp
Investigation of the origin of modern English, with a study of the evolution of English sounds, inflections, vocabulary, and syntax, from earliest times to the present. Previous NMHU ENGL 541.

ENGL 5420. Contemporary English Linguistics (3); Var
An examination of the structures, processes, and functions of elements of the English language, with particular attention to their description in the theories of cognitive grammar. Previous NMHU ENGL 542.

ENGL 5430. Sociolinguistics (3); Alt, Sp, Odd
A study of dialects, bilingualism, multilingualism, speech communities, and regional and social variations as they relate to linguistic variables. Course includes methodological concern and relationships between sociolinguistics and related disciplines. Previous NMHU ENGL 543.

ENGL 5500 – 6500. Seminar in English (1 – 4 VC); Var
Seminar course in a topic or topics in English. Previous NMHU ENGL 550 – 650.

ENGL 5650. Non-Fiction Prose (3); Alt, Sp, Even
An introduction to the reading, analysis, and writing of nonfiction works, such as biography, political prose, propaganda, history, and the essay. Emphasis on critical reading and thinking, interpretative skills, and writing nonfiction forms. The reading component of this course will include theoretical and creative texts. Previous NMHU ENGL 565.

ENGL 5820. Literature of the Southwest (3); Var
An examination of the tri-cultural literary heritage of the southwestern United States. Readings include journals and diaries of the Territorial Period, as well as imaginative works by novelists of the Southwest. Emphasis is placed on cultural traditions that shaped the literature. Previous NMHU ENGL 582.

ENGL 5850. Stylistics (3); Var
An examination of linguistic principles, specifically as they apply to the analysis of written texts. Students will learn to make the kind of textual observations needed to reveal stylistic traits and tendencies in the language of literature. Previous NMHU ENGL 585.

ENGL 5900 – 6900. Independent Study (1 – 4 VC); Var
Independent study of selected author(s) or topic(s) arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU ENGL 590 – 690. 

ENGL 5910. Arthurian Literature (3); Var
Literature generated by the legends of King Arthur and his court, studied in a variety of European texts from the Middles Ages. Previous NMHU ENGL 591.

ENGL 5920. Independent Research (1 – 4 VC); Var
Independent research project arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU ENGL 592.

ENGL 6010. Research Methods in English (3); Fa
Methods, sources, and tools of research for linguistics, composition, and literature. Previous NMHU ENGL 601.

ENGL 6020. Theories in Writing (3); Var
A comprehensive background of the development of writing programs, theory, and research in American education. Attention to the writing process, as well as genres of both academic and non-academic settings. Previous NMHU ENGL 602.

ENGL 6030. Contemporary Literary Theories (3); Var
An in-depth study of a topic or combination of related topics involving current trends in literary theory. Varying subtitles for the course might include literary canon formation, deconstructionism, feminist theory, new historicism, psychoanalytic theory, Marxist theory, reader-response criticism, and comparative literature. May be repeated with a change of topic. Previous NMHU ENGL 603.

ENGL 6100. Major American Poets (3); Var
Intensive reading and study of four important American poets of the twentieth century. Different poets will be featured each time the course is offered. Class discussion of the poets and their work will be the focus of the course. Previous NMHU ENGL 610.

ENGL 6360. Varieties of Romanticism (3); Var
A consideration of the varieties of Romanticism across time and cultures, contextualization of the British Romantic experience against the background of developments in Germany and France, and an examination of the heritage of Romanticism in all its postmodern vitality. Previous NMHU ENGL 636.

ENGL 6410. The History of Popular Literature (3); Var
A survey of the development of popular literature, from the “street literature” that emerged in the decades immediately following the invention of movable type, to the genre fiction of today. Readings will include popular literary works in a variety of genres, such as romance, horror, and thrillers. Previous NMHU ENGL 641. 

ENGL 6510. Images and Words: Semiotics (3); Var
A semiotic approach to the study of meaning. Various sign systems, as expressed in the visual and verbal representations of cultural practice, myth, and literature will be examined. Previous NMHU ENGL 651.

ENGL 6610. Literacy and Orality (3); Var
A survey of the development of alphabetic writing in the West. Issues covered include writing and cognitive development, conflicting definitions of literacy, politics of literacy, and literacy education. Previous NMHU ENGL 6610.

ENGL 6710. Creative Writing Workshop (3); Alt, Sp, Even
This course is an advanced workshop in the writing of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction. Students will read works in and theories of the genre and produce a portfolio of original works. The reading component of this course will include theoretical and creative texts. Previous NMHU ENGL 671.

ENGL 6960. Publishable Papers (1 – 3 VC); Fa, Sp
Individual research, writing, and rewriting in preparation of the graduate portfolio. Cannot be taken for elective credit. Only 3 credit hours count towards the degree, but students will register for extra credit hour ENGL 6960 in the semester in which they graduate. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Previous NMHU ENGL 696.

ENGL 6990. Thesis (1 – 6 VC); Fa, Sp
Individual research and writing in preparation of the graduate thesis. After enrolling for thesis, students must continue to enroll for at least one credit hour of thesis each semester until the thesis is completed. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU ENGL 699. 

Courses in Exercise Science (EXSC)

EXSC 5050. Body Composition (3); 2, 2 Fa
Theory and practice of body composition assessment and right management programs will be presented. Laboratories will include skinfolds, bio-impedance, and hydrostatic weighing techniques. Previous NMHU HPS 505.

EXSC 5080. Principles, Ethics, and Problems of Athletic Coaching (3); Fa
Seminar approach to non-technical, “off-field” aspects of athletic coaching, including education implications, equipment, financing, liability, and coach-athlete rapport. Prerequisite: Human performance major/minor, coaching minor, athletic training minor, or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU HPS 508.

EXSC 5090. Economics and Finance of Sport (3); 3, 0 Su
This course will explore the principles of financial management and economics of the sport industry. Budgeting practices, fundraising methods, economic impact analyses, methods of financing, and computer applications in financial management will be analyzed in the context of sport. Previous NMHU HPS 509.

EXSC 5120. Public Relations in Sport (3); 3, 0 Su
This course will provide both theoretical and practical applications of public relations with regard to the sport industry. Specific managerial functions relating to effective communication with various publics will be analyzed, including employee relations, community relations, media relations, customer relations, and image enhancement. Previous NMHU HPS 512.

EXSC 5150. Women in Sport (3); Sp
This course discusses the past, present, and future of women in sport. Information includes the historical and cultural foundation of women’s sport from ancient to modern times, biomedical considerations specific to women, and the psychosocial dimensions of women’s sport. Previous NMHU HPS 515.

EXSC 5160. Aquatic Management (3); Fa
This course is designed to provide guidelines for safe operation and efficient management of swimming pools and other related aquatic facilities. Students will take the Certified Pool Operator certification examination the end of the course. A score of 75% or above certifies the student as a Certified Pool Operator for five years. Previous NMHU HPS 516.

EXSC 5210. Designs for Fitness (3); 3, 0 Sp
This course teaches the comprehensive approaches to writing exercise prescriptions for cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness, and weight management programs. Additionally, graduate students must analyze current exercise prescription research. Previous NMHU HPS 521.

EXSC 5240. Sport Psychology (3); Var
The overall objective of this course is to identify and understand important psychological concepts related to sport and exercise psychology and application of these concepts to teaching, coaching, and consulting situations.  This class focuses on the application of psychological principles of behavior to individuals and groups involved in physical activity. This course examines the questions of how variables influence individuals’ psychological development and how they affect their participation and performance in physical activity. Various mental skills (e.g., imagery, goal setting) will be introduced through discussion of pertinent theory and research. This class is specifically designed to help students begin formulating practical strategies for teaching various psychological skills. The application of knowledge grounded in theory and research will be stressed.

EXSC 5280. Nutrition and Supplements for Sports (3); Sp
Various sports supplements used as ergogenic aids will be discussed, as to their use, safety, and validity. Previous NMHU HPS 528.

EXSC 5300. ACSM Health Fitness Instructor Review (3); Fa
This course will help prepare students for the certification in Health/Fitness Instructor by the American College of Sports Medicine. Previous NMHU HPS 530.

EXSC 5320. NSCA Strength Coach Review (3); Sp
A course designed to help students prepare for the National Strength and Conditioning Association’s Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) exam. The course will focus on NSCA terminology and training philosophy, helping to integrate the student’s knowledge of personal training, exercise physiology, and kinesiology. Previous NMHU HPS 532.

EXSC 5340 – 6340. Practicum in Human Performance and Sport (1 – 4 VC); Fa, Sp, Su
Field experience work placement with specific responsibility over a sustained period of time. Includes on-campus seminars with supervisor. Credit hours for each experience are approved separately by program area. May be repeated for a maximum of four credit hours. Practicum areas may be offered in aquatics, adapted physical education, athletic coaching, athletic training, health education, and physical education. Prerequisite: Pre-approval by petition and permission of instructor. Previous NMHU HPS 534 – 634.

EXSC 5350 – 6350. Selected Topics in Human Performance and Sport (1 – 4 VC); Var
Course in topic or topics in human performance and sport. May be repeated with change of content. Previous NMHU HPS 535 -635.

EXSC 5350. Selected Topic in Health (3); Var
Course in topic or topics in health. May be repeated with change of content. Previous NMHU HLTH 535.

EXSC 5360. Pediatric Exercise Physiology (3); Su
The physiological aspects of exercise in children will be discussed. Differences between the physiology of adults and children will be compared to enhance the understanding of this special population. Previous NMHU HPS 536.

EXSC 5380. Physical Activity and Aging (3); Su
The Biological aspects of aging and their relationship to physical fitness and assessment are discussed. Previous NMHU HPS 538.

EXSC 5400. Experiential Activities (3); Var
Developing a repertoire of activities to promote self-esteem, improve communication skills, promote group cohesion and trust among individuals, and to expand problem-solving skills. Previous NMHU HPS 540.

EXSC 5500. Seminar in Human Performance and Sport (1 – 4 VC); Var
Seminar investigations in physical education and/or the related areas of health education, recreation, and athletics. Previous NMHU HPS 550.

EXSC 5610. Sport Marketing and Promotion (3); 3, 0 Fa
Course will cover elements and salient issues in management of sport marketing and promotion including segmentation and targeting, marketing mix, research, and analysis. Previous NMHU HPS 561.

EXSC 5650. Planning Areas and Facilities (3); Fa
Planning, financing, and managing physical education and athletic grounds and facilities, health and fitness centers, private and commercial facilities, and campsites–course is designed for professional personnel. Previous NMHU HPS 565.

EXSC 5680. Physical Education for Special Populations (3); Sp
Investigations of the historical aspects and current issues of providing adapted/special physical education programs for special populations. The course covers implications of federal legislation, practice in preparing Individual Education Programs (IEPs), and program assessment, planning, and evaluation. Previous NMHU HPS 568.

EXSC 5720. Biomechanics of Sport (3); Sp
An examination of the musculoskeletal system and how it related to human movement. This will include analysis of human movement and sport techniques, using principles of biomechanics. Previous NMHU HPS 572.

EXSC 5760. Stress Testing (3); 2, 2 Fa
Theory and practice of graded exercise testing for analysis of safe functional capacity and for prescription of exercise training programs. Students will learn to read EKG’s and monitor blood pressure during testing. Prerequisites: HLED 3700 and HLED 3760. Special lab fee. Previous NMHU HPS 576.

EXSC 5780. Psychology of Coaching (3); Sp
This course is a practical survey of sport psychology that is grounded in science. Attitudes, feelings, and behaviors that affect athletic performance and coaching effectiveness are dealt with from the standpoint of description, explanation, and prediction. Students develop the ability to interpret research results. Major topical areas include review of psychological needs of athletes and coaches, and development of mental skills and control with applied techniques. Previous NMHU HPS 578.

EXSC 5900. Independent Study (1 – 4 VC); Fa, Sp, Su
Individual, directed study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU HLTH 590.

EXSC 5900 – 6900. Independent Study (1 – 4 VC); Fa
Individual, directed study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU HPS 590 – 690.

EXSC 5980 – 6980. Internship (1 – 9 VC); As needed
External work placement with substantial responsibilities. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Pre-arrangement and permission of instructor. Previous NMHU HPS 598 – 698.

EXSC 6040. Curriculum Design (3); Su
A critical evaluation of curricula patterns in exercise and sport sciences (past and present). Topics include: National and State Standards for your ESS area of interest, development of a sports handbook or curriculum guide for your ESS area of interest, and development of an advocacy plan for your ESS area on interest. Previous NMHU HPS 604. 

EXSC 6120. Sport in Society (3); Su
An investigation of the influence sports have had in American society, including Little League, interscholastic, intercollegiate, and professional sports. The course will include a critical analysis of such trends as violence in sports. Previous NMHU HPS 612.

EXSC 6130. Physical Education, Athletics, and the Law (3); Sp
A study of the areas of negligence, supervision, and administrative issues related to school settings. Previous NMHU HPS 613.

EXSC 6200. Research Methods in Human Performance, Leisure, and Sport (3); Fa
Topics include descriptive methods, experimental design, and historical research; formal writing procedures; measurements; the research process; and library techniques. The composition of a manuscript is a major part of the course. Previous NMHU HPS 620.

EXSC 6410. Issues in Human Performance, Leisure, and Sport (3); Sp
A seminar on issues in the human performance, leisure, sport fields studied, analyzed, written formally, and presented orally. The composition of a manuscript comprises a prominent portion of the course. Previous NMHU HPS 641.

EXSC 6500. Seminar in Human Performance and Sport (1); As needed
The development and exchange of scholarly information and/or secondary research in physical education. The exchange of ideas may involve written papers and critiques as well as oral presentations. Previous NMHU HPS 650.

EXSC 6510. The Administration of Athletics (3); Fa
The relationship of interscholastic and intercollegiate athletics to education; implementation of athletic programs for men and women; eligibility; finance; trends, development in management; and public relations. Previous NMHU HPS 651. 

EXSC 6600. History and Philosophy of Physical Education and Sport (3); Fa
A seminar approach to the historical and contemporary foundations, philosophies, future of physical education, and sport. Previous NMHU HPS 660.

EXSC 6700. Assessment and Evaluation in Human Performance, Leisure, and Sport (3); Sp
An interpretation of practical statistical data utilized in the assessment and evaluation of athletic and physical education performance. Previous NMHU HPS 670.

EXSC 6820. Physiological Basis of Sport Performance and Conditioning Programs (3); Var
Review of current scientific literature on the functioning of body systems during training and competition, with specific emphasis on the development of strength, power, flexibility, cardiovascular endurance, agility, and speed. Factors affecting performance such as nutrition, altitude, and thermal stress will also be covered. Previous NMHU HPS 682.

EXSC 6920. Independent Research (1 – 4 VC); Var
Independent research arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU HPS 692.

EXSC 6970. Field Project (1 – 6 VC); Fa, Sp, Su
Individual field research and writing in preparation of a graduate field project (equivalent to a thesis). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU HPS 697.

EXSC 6980. Internship (1 – 9); Var
External work placement with substantial responsibilities. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Pre-arrangement and permission of instructor. Previous NMHU HPS 698.

EXSC 6990. Thesis (1 – 6 VC); Fa, Sp, Su
Individual research and writing in preparation of a graduate thesis. Prerequisites: HPS 620, HPS 670 and permission of instructor. Previous NMHU HPS 699.

Courses in Finance (BFIN)

BFIN 5050. Financial Markets and Institutions (3); Fa
This course focuses on the use of financial markets by the private and public sectors and the facilitating role played by intermediary agents. The course relies on the basic tools of micro- and macroeconomics theory in the study of private and public financial behavior and the problems posed for public policy. Previous NMHU FIN 505.

BFIN 5750. International Financial Management (3); Sp
An overview of the workings of trade and finance in an international setting. Particular attention is given to handling problems associated with exchange rate movements, sources of funds for overseas operations and investments, and criteria to judge foreign investment opportunities. Previous NMHU FIN 575.

BFIN 6070. Financial Management (3); Fa, Sp
A study of the tools and techniques used in financial management. Analysis of financial needs, acquisition of financial resources, and allocation of funds are covered in readings, case problems, and class discussions. Prerequisite: ACCT 6050. Previous NMHU FIN 607.

BFIN 6090. Investments (3); Sp
Provides an understanding of investment history, practices and the various types of securities traded in financial markets. It focuses on investment strategies, portfolio construction and management. Prerequisite: BFIN 6070. Previous NMHU FIN 609. 

Courses in Forestry (FORS) 

FORS 5000. Surface Hydrology (3); Alt, Sp, Even
This is a course designed for graduate students in earth sciences and natural resources management. The course combines a qualitative conceptual understanding of hydrologic process, an introduction to the quantitative representation of those processes, and an understanding of approaches to hydrological measurements and the uncertainties involved in those measurements. Previous NMHU FOR 500.

FORS 5020. Silviculture (3); Sp
Silviculture is the set of practices to grow and manage trees. The course focuses on the factors affecting tree growth, tree stand dynamics and health, and the impact of management on ecosystem values. The ecological practices to sustainably produce forest products are emphasized. Previous NMHU FOR 502.

FORS 5050. Wildland Fire Management (3); Var
This is a course on the behavior of wildfires in forest and range ecosystems. The course reviews methods for fuel load assessment, fire weather prediction, fire suppression, and prescribed fire. Contrasts will be made between the costs and benefits of fires on ecosystem and humans. Previous NMHU FOR 505.

FORS 5080. Limnology (4); 3, 2; Alt, Fa, Even
This course is a study of the interrelationships among plants, animals, and environmental factors in aquatic ecosystems. The course is field oriented and concentrates on the development of sampling techniques and the analysis of biotic and abiotic components of nearby lakes and streams. Previous NMHU FOR 508.

FORS 5100. Forest Management (3); Fa
This course focuses on the economic and scientific decisions for large tracts of land and multiple types of forest stands. The elements of planning management activities to create the least costs and greatest benefits to a landowner are explored. Previous NMHU FOR 510.

FORS 5110. Mensuration and Biometrics (4); Fa
Mensuration is the practice of measuring lengths and angles. Biometrics is the set of techniques for measurement and analysis of biological phenomena. Together, these topics provide a comprehensive overview of measurement and analysis techniques used in forestry and natural sciences. Previous NMHU FOR 511.

FORS 5120. Surveying and Geographic Information Systems (4); 3, 2 Fa, Sp
Surveying is the determination of boundaries and positions on the earth’s surface. Geographic information systems are geospatially referenced databases that relate positions of objects to associated data and properties. The course explores the application of these technologies to forestry and geology problems. Previous NMHU FOR 512.

FORS 5130. Ecological & Environmental Monitoring (3); Var
Monitoring is the observation of treatment effects on the conditions of natural and human systems over time. Many systems are monitored for pollutants and regulatory compliance, adverse outcomes of environmental management practices, and to determine trends in animal and plant populations. The course explores roles of monitoring in environmental management and ecology, considerations in designing monitoring programs, sampling methodologies for soil conditions, water quality, animal and plant populations, and responses to treatments, and uses of monitoring results. Previous NMHU FOR 513.

FORS 5150. Dendrology (3); 2, 2 Fa
Dendrology is the study of trees and woody vegetation. The course will first look at tree and shrub identification with associated botanical nomenclature. The second portion of the course examines the structure and function of trees and woody vegetation. A collection of local trees and shrubs is a requirement of the course. Previous NMHU FOR 515.

FORS 5160. Soil Science (4); Fa
This course provides students with basic soil science concepts. The physical, chemical, and ecological properties of soils are applied to soil classification, genesis, fertility, productivity, irrigation, and erosion. Previous NMHU FOR 516.

FORS 5170. Watershed Management (4); 3, 2 Alt, Fa, Even
This course emphasizes the interdisciplinary characteristics of watershed management and the need to incorporate physical, chemical, biological and socioeconomic factors when planning and implementing natural resource programs to achieve sustainable, environmentally sound natural resource development. Previous NMHU FOR 517.

FORS 5200. Wildlife Habitat Management (3); Sp
This course explores principles and practice of wildlife management; with emphasis on habitat, distribution, abundance and legal considerations. Previous NMHU FOR 520.

FORS 5220. Forest Pathology (3); Var
This course is a survey of the beneficial and pathogenic microorganisms found in forests. Particular focus will be on pathogens that reduce commodity value and stand productivity, and microorganisms that have beneficial effects in forested ecosystems. Methods of detection and response to pathogen infestations will be examined. Previous NMHU FOR 522.

FORS 5250. Field Safety Practices (1); Fa
This course provides training to graduate students in the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s heavy equipment and field operations regulations, safe practices for field workers, and risk management and liability issues surrounding field work by various types of personnel. Field Safety Practices is required for natural resources management graduate students. Graduate students will prepare a field risk-management plan for their thesis work. Previous NMHU FOR 525.

FORS 5280. Forest Entomology (3); Var
This course is an introduction to the study of arthropods and insects. Particular focus will be on arthropods that reduce commodity value, threaten human and animal health, or have beneficial effects. Methods to manipulate arthropod population to achieve management objects are discussed. Previous NMHU FOR 528.

FORS 5310. Terrestrial Ecology (4); Var
The ecology of natural and artificial groups of terrestrial organisms used in the production of goods and services is the focus of this course. Course topics include biological productivity, vegetation dynamics, biodiversity, range ecosystems, forest ecosystems, and pest populations. Previous NMHU FOR 531.

FORS 5350-6350. ST: Selected Topic in Natural Resources Management (1-4 VC); Var
Course in topic(s) in natural resources management. May be repeated with change of content. Previous NMHU FOR 535-635.

FORS 5400. Integrated Natural Resources Management (3); Var
This course is an introductory course to the broad field of natural resources management for graduate students who do not have a resource management background. The course will cover the ecological and biological underpinnings of agriculture, forestry, range management, watershed management, and ancillary fields, as well as the decision-making processes that are utilized. Natural resources management will be placed in the context of broader societal mandates and concerns about natural, environmental, and cultural resources. Previous NMHU FOR 540.

FORS 5530. Toxicology in Life Science (4); 3, 2 Var
Toxicology studies the effects of chemical substances on the health of organisms and ecosystems. Toxic substances from industrial activities have wide ranging effects on natural systems at long distances from sources. Moreover, toxic substances are utilized in health care, agriculture, forestry, wildlife management, and fisheries to manipulate populations of pests. This course explores the basic principles of toxicology, and application of toxicology to life science and environmental problems. Previous NMHU FOR 553.

FORS 5610. Atmospheric Science (3); Var
Atmospheric science embeds the disciplines of meteorology, climatology, and air pollution regulation and management. The structure and dynamics of the atmosphere will be explored with an emphasis on air pollutant dispersion. The linkage of atmospheric dynamics to biotic, geologic, aquatic and marine systems phenomena will be highlighted. Previous NMHU FOR 561.

FORS 5890. Applied Ecology and Environmental Restoration (3); Alt, Fa, Even
This course explores ecological principles applied to solving environmental problems including pest and biological resource management, conservation biology, environmental planning, impact assessment, remediation, reclamation and ecological restoration. Previous NMHU FOR 589.

FORS 6020. Environmental Assessment (NEPA) (2); Var
This course explores principles and practice of the science and art of assessing environmental impacts of various stress agents in the environment. It includes consideration of the legal framework (e.g., National Environmental Policy Act), various approaches to prediction and assessment of environmental impacts, and factors entering environmental decision making. Previous NMHU FOR 602.

FORS 6200 Advanced Topics in Natural Resource Management (2); Var
This course is an in-depth consideration of a specific topic of interest to faculty and graduate students. Subject matter will vary from semester to semester, and, the course may be repeated for credit. Previous NMHU FOR 620.

FORS 6250 Advanced Quantitative Methods in Natural Resource Management (3); Fa
The course provides hands-on experience with the analysis and design of experiments and observational studies. Parametric and nonparametric techniques commonly utilized in the analysis of ecological, biological, and environmental data sets will be explored. Students will gain familiarity with the use of spreadsheets and statistical software programs for data analysis. Previous NMHU FOR 625.

FORS 6300 Vegetation Analysis and Management (3); Var
Vegetation analysis entails the methods to measure and characterize plant communities and associations. These techniques are useful in habitat typing and the recognition of sensitive systems. The other aspect of the course are the techniques that are commonly utilized to manage vegetation, both desirable and undesirable. Economic and social considerations in vegetation management are also discussed. Previous NMHU FOR 630.

FORS 6400 Recreational Resource Management (2); Var
This course explores the fundamentals of managing recreation on or near public lands to minimize disruption of natural ecosystems and cultural artifacts. Recreation is currently the greatest social and monetary use of public lands in the United States. Natural resource managers are often involved with teams to analyze and mitigate adverse impacts from pack stock in wilderness areas, off-road vehicles, heavy pedestrian traffic, campgrounds, trails, and unwanted vegetation and animals. People with a background in recreational resource management are involved in local, state, and federal parks and monuments, and public lands with recreational uses. Previous NMHU FOR 640.

FORS 6900. Independent Study (1-4 VC); Fa, Sp, Su
Independent study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU FOR 690.

FORS 6920. Independent Research (1-4 VC); Fa, Sp, Su
Independent research arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU FOR 692.

FORS 6990. Thesis (1-7 VC); Fa, Sp, Su
Individual research and writing in preparation of a graduate thesis. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU FOR 699. 

Courses in Women’s Studies (GNDR) 

GNDR 5180. Reproductive Justice (3); Fa, Sp
This class examines the reproductive justice theoretical framework, its history, origins, and conceptualization to explore its practical applications for transformative feminist activism and theorizing. Reproductive justice developed as a multi-layered theoretical paradigm and model for theorists/activists concerned about issues surrounding reproductive dignity. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110. 

GNDR 5260. Gender, Food, and Culture (3); Var
This class takes interdisciplinary gendered perspectives to explore the ways that food behaviors and beliefs surrounding the production, distribution, and consumption of food, influence constructions of identity, femininity/masculinity, culture, sexuality, and reinforce and contest gender hierarchies. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110.

Courses in Geology (GEOL)

GEOL 5120. Geologic Resources, Laws, and Environmental Policies (3); Alt, Sp, Even
This course is designed to raise students’ awareness about rock and mineral resource occurrences and the policies in place to protect public and private lands from hard rock mining impacts. The course briefly covers the nature and origin of the Earth’s rock and mineral resources, methods of resource extraction, and impacts on the environment. The course thoroughly covers the major types of regional and federal environmental policies, discusses the roles of the major players in the public policy process, and considers how to use science to inform the debate and remediate or lessen mining impacts. The class will study the 1872 Mining Law, which grants free and open occupation, exploration, and purchase of public lands to U.S. citizens as well as the 1993 New Mexico Mining Act that improved regulation of mining at the state level. Selected New Mexico hard rock mining cases and issues relevant to the Southwest will also be reviewed. Previous NMHU GEOL 512.

GEOL 5150. Remote Sensing and Analysis (4); 3, 2 Fa
Remote sensing is a technique used to collect data about the Earth without taking a physical sample of the Earth’s surface. A sensor is used to measure the energy reflected from the earth. This information can be displayed as a digital image or as a photograph. This class provides students with an understanding of remote sensing theory, applications, and case studies, conceptual and working knowledge of airborne and satellite remote sensing and image processing. Students will be able to acquire data, process the images, create appropriate data, analyze the accuracy of the results, and utilize the data for specific applications. Previous NMHU GEOL 515.

GEOL 5180. Advanced Geographic Information Systems (4); 3, 2 Sp
A geographic information system (GIS) is a scheme of hardware, software, and procedures designed to support the capture, management, manipulation, analysis, modeling and display of spatially referenced data for solving complex planning and management problems. GIS applications are both spatial information (maps) and databases to perform analytical studies. The course will build upon knowledge and experience in GIS gained in the introductory course to provide students with an understanding of cartographic and geodetic concepts impacting GIS analysis, field data-collection techniques with global positioning systems and handheld computer mapping software, effective map design, and modeling topographic and statistical surfaces. Prerequisites: FORS 5120 with at least a C or better, or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU GEOL 518.

GEOL 5210. Environmental Ground Water Hydrology (4); Alt, Sp, Even
This course is a study of the origin, movement, method of entrapment, and removal of subsurface waters. Course includes extensive discussion of problems associated with ground water pollution and remediation. Previous NMHU GEOL 521.

GEOL 5220. Genesis and Environmental Impact of the Earth’s Resources (3); Var
This course is a study of the distribution, mineralogy, classification, modes of occurrence, and economic implications to industry and world affairs of mineral deposits. Previous NMHU GEOL 522.

GEOL 5240. Environmental Geophysics (4); Alt, Fa, Even
How do we know about structures in the subsurface without digging of drilling? Is water present? How deep is bedrock? Where are those buried drums of hazardous waste? Is there anything buried here of prehistoric value? There is only one way to find these things out: geophysics. Lectures and class discussions will develop the basic principles of each method (gravity, magnetic, paleo-magnetic, seismic, resistivity, and electromagnetic techniques). Group cooperation on weekly assigned exercises and field reports is encouraged, and an individual or small group research project on a topic (or topics) of interest is required. Previous NMHU GEOL 524.

GEOL 5250. Geomorphology (4); 3, 2 Alt, Sp, Odd
Geomorphology is the study of landforms. The emphasis in this class is on the physical, chemical, and biological processes, which create and modify landforms. Nonetheless, an understanding of the history of landforms, and the climatic and tectonic conditions that influence landform evolution, are also essential to understanding the form of the Earth’s surface. Previous NMHU GEOL 525.

GEOL 5320. Environmental Geochemistry (4); 3, 2 Alt, Sp, Even
Environmental Geochemistry is a study of the chemistry of the Earth, including mineral mobility, cosmo-chemistry, chemical weathering, diagenesis, igneous and metamorphic chemistry, stable isotopes, pollution, and the thermodynamics and kinetics associated with these systems. Previous NMHU GEOL 532.

GEOL 5350. Selected Topic in Geology (1 – 4 VC); Var
Course in topic or topics in geology. May be repeated with change of content. Previous NMHU GEOL 535.

GEOL 5920. Independent Research (1 – 4 VC); Fa, Sp, Su
Individual, directed research arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU GEOL 592.

GEOL 5940. GIS Capstone Seminar (3); Fa, Sp
Individual, directed research study arranged with an instructor. Students will conduct an independent research project involving GIS and/or remote sensing analysis applied to a subject of study associated with their discipline. Each student will present a written report and applied GIS project to his or her mentor. All students will be responsible for demonstrating how GIS technology has enabled them to more effectively address a spatial problem. Prerequisites: FORS 5120 or GEOL 5150 Remote Sensing and Analysis, and GEOL 5180 Advanced GIS. Previous NMHU GEOL 590.

GEOL 6000. Environmental Mineralogy (3); Var
This course explores an emerging topic that combines the studies of mineralogy and environmental science. Topics cover the physical and chemical properties of minerals and how scientists are applying mineralogy to serious environmental problems caused by human activity. Numerous environmental case studies will be explored. Previous NMHU GEOL 600.

GEOL 6200. Clay Mineralogy (4); 3, 2 Var
This is a lecture and laboratory course. The lecture provides an in-depth survey of the structures, classification, genesis, weathering, and importance of clay minerals in controlling nutrient uptake, influencing the plastic properties of earth materials and retarding the mobility’s of contaminants in the environment. Weekly laboratory time will be dedicated to providing X-ray safety training, covering principles of X-ray diffraction, and utilizing a powder X-ray diffractometer for qualitative and quantitative clay analysis. Previous NMHU GEOL 620.

GEOL 6220. Advanced Topics in Geology (2); Var
This course is an in-depth consideration of a specific geology topic of interest to faculty and graduate students.  Subject matter will vary from semester to semester, and the course may be repeated for credit.

GEOL 6500. Seminar (1); Var
Seminar course in a topic or topics in Geology. May be repeated with change of topic. Previous NMHU GEOL 650.

GEOL 6900. Independent Study (1-4 VC); Fa, Sp, Su
Independent study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU GEOL 690.

GEOL 6920. Independent Research (1-4 VC); Fa, Sp, Su
Individual, directed research arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.  Note: this course currently exists as GEOL 5920. Previous NMHU GEOL 692.

GEOL 6990. Thesis (1-7 VC); Fa, Sp, Su
Individual research and writing in preparation of a graduate thesis. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU GEOL 699. 

Courses in General Education (GNED)

GNED 5900-6900. Independent Study (1-4 VC); Var
Individual, directed study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous GNED 590-690.

GNED 6050. Statistics for Educators (3); Fa, Sp, Su
Basic statistics essential to the collection, summarization, and interpretation of statistical data that the educator frequently encounters. Previous GNED 605.

GNED 6100. Educational Research Interpretation (3); Fa, Sp, Su
Prepares the potential research consumer to analyze and evaluate research critically, to understand fundamental research principles and techniques, and to design research stratagems for problem areas in education. Prerequisite: GNED 6050. Previous GNED 610.

GNED 6110. Action Research in Education (3); Sp
Action Research is a graduate level class addressing both educational research and school improvement. The aims of Action Research include: a) development of the school leader’s knowledge and skills in applied research techniques and developing action research for implementation in classrooms and schools, and b) preparing school leaders for informed analysis and evaluation of research. Previous GNED 611.

GNED 6150. Instructional Strategy and Mentoring (3); Fa
Investigation and development of lessons based on a variety of teaching strategies that are appropriate for different grade levels and subject areas. Peer mentoring skills will be developed through coaching activities while practicing various teaching strategies. Previous GNED 615.

GNED 6300. Advanced Placement Institute (3); Su
A summer institute and two day follow up designed to prepare teachers to teach Advanced Placement and Pre AP courses. Previous GNED 630. 

GNED 5350–6350. Selected Topic in General Education (1–4 VC); Var
Course in topic or topics in general education. May be repeated with change of content. Previous GNED 535-635. 

GNED 6400. Curriculum Design & Management for Advanced Placement (3); Su
This course will provide an in-depth discussion of academic content and methods for delivering instruction in Advanced Placement classrooms. Previous GNED 640.

GNED 6410. Advanced Educational Psychology (3); Sp
Application of recent learning research to instructional, curricular, and administrative problems. Previous GNED 641.

GNED 6450. Socio-Cultural Factors Affecting Education (3); Sp
Studies of the social and cultural factors influencing educational practice with emphasis on Hispanic and Native American cultures of the Southwest and identification of local factors of a social/cultural nature that influence educational practice. Previous GNED 645.

GNED 6520. Topics in Advanced Placement (3); Su
This course is designed to deal with topics related to Advanced Placement. Students become familiar with the College Boards’ mission, course description, standards and skills in AP English Literature and Language, and the Vertical Teams approach. Previous GNED 652.

GNED 6630. Principles of Curriculum Construction (3); Var
A study of the social, cultural, psychological, and philosophical bases related to the principles and technical problems of curriculum development. The course assists in the identification of local educational needs through assessment. Previous GNED 663.

GNED 6970. Field Project (1–6 VC); Var
Individual field research and writing in preparation of a graduate field project (equivalent to a thesis). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous GNED 697.

GNED 6990. Thesis (1–6 VC); Var
Individual research and writing in preparation of a graduate thesis. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous GNED 699. 

Courses in Health Education (HLED)

HLED 5150. Health, Culture & Diversity (3); Fa
This course examines what is meant by culture, the ways in which culture intersects with health issues, how public health efforts can benefit by understanding and working with cultural processes, and an overview of conceptual tools and research methods that are useful in identifying relationships between culture and health. Previous NMHU HLTH 515.

HLED 5210. Epidemiology (3); Sp
Epidemiology, the study of “all around,” is the science behind public health statistics. Epidemiological concepts and skills involving interpretation and use of health-related data in populations or groups are studied. The course enables the understanding of causes and transmission of disease, tracking community health problems, and identifying trends related to public health problems. Critical judgment in assessing health related data is developed. Prerequisite: HLED 3210 or the equivalent. Previous NMHU HLTH 521.

HLED 5690. Public Health and Wellness (3); Sp
This course includes advanced public health concepts and development of critical thinking about the role of public health in the community. With interactive discussions, the course reviews community health promotion objectives and epidemiologically derived statistical information. Comprehensive focus is on three major areas: community health promotion, environmental health protection, and health resources and services. Prerequisite: HLED 3210 or the equivalent. Previous NMHU HLTH 569.

HLED 5740. Stress Management (3); Sp
This course includes an overview of the body of literature available on the topic of stress and the techniques required to manage stress effectively. With interactive discussions, the course reviews health promotion objectives as they relate to stress. Course modules include; a) the nature of stress; b) the mind and soul; c) coping strategies; d) relaxation techniques. Comprehensive focus is on strategies designed to help one cope with the stressors of life. Previous NMHU HLTH 574.

HLED 5890. Fitness/Wellness Program Leadership (3); Sp
Practical field experience and supportive lecture in the fitness and wellness program management aspects of health promotion. Leadership skills include administration, health education, nutrition strategy, and applied exercise science/technology. Students assist in the operation of the New Mexico Highlands University Wellness (HU-Wellness) Program. Students may want to choose another work site to gain valuable field experience upon approval from the professor. Previous NMHU HLTH 589.

Courses in History (HIST)

HIST 5010. The Chicano Experience (3); Var
This course explores the major trends in the historical experience and development of Chicanos in American society. Previous NMHU HIST 501.

HIST 5030. Chicano Leadership (3); Var
This course studies the significant leaders among the Hispanic population in the Southwest during the Mexican territorial and early statehood periods. Previous NMHU HIST 503.

HIST 5060. North American Frontiers (3); Var
Patterns of settlement in North America, with emphasis on frontier experience in the United States, are examined in the course. Previous NMHU HIST 506.

HIST 5110. Women in the United States (3); Var
This course is a survey of the role of women in the history of the United States, including methodological and conceptual developments. Previous NMHU HIST 511.

HIST 5120. The Civil War and Reconstruction (3); Var
The Old South, secession, civil conflict, Radical Reconstruction are covered in this course. Previous NMHU HIST 512.

HIST 5130. The United States Since World War II (3); Var
This course covers American society and foreign policy from Pearl Harbor to the present. Previous NMHU HIST 513.

HIST 5140. The American Presidency (3) Var
The history, institution, and powers of the chief executive of the United States are examined in this course. Previous NMHU HIST 514.

HIST 5350 – 6350. Selected Topic in History (1 – 4 VC); Var
Course in a topic or topics in history: may be repeated with change of content. Previous NMHU HIST 535 – 635.

HIST 5500 – 6500. Seminar in History (1 – 4 VC); Var
Seminar course in a topic or topics in history. Previous NMHU HIST 550 – 650.

HIST 5520. Seminar: New Mexico History (3); Var
Seminar course in a topic or topics in New Mexico history. Previous NMHU HIST 552.

HIST 5530. History of the Southwest (3); Var
This course is an analysis of historic and contemporary issues confronting peoples of the Southwest. Previous NMHU HIST 553.

HIST 5540. Seminar: History Through Film (3); Var
Movies are a tremendously powerful means of conveying ideas, including those having to do with the past. This seminar examines the relationship between film and history in a particular historical context. Previous NMHU HIST 554.

HIST 5900 – 6900. Independent Study (1 – 4 VC); Var
Independent, directed study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU HIST 590 -690.

HIST 6150. Seminar: Contemporary Historical Thought (3); Var
This course reviews the development of the concept of history in the western world, with an emphasis on recent interpretations of historical theory. Previous NMHU HIST 615.

HIST 6180. Seminar: The Southwest (3); Var
This course covers analysis and writing in Chicano, Anglo, and Indian history. Previous NMHU HIST 618.

HIST 6190. Seminar: New Mexico Since Statehood (3); Var
This course consists of research and writing on topics in New Mexico since 1912. Previous NMHU HIST 619.

HIST 6200. Research Methods in History and Political Science (3); Fa
This course covers historical methods, including sources, criticism, tools, organization, form, and problems. Cross-listed as POLS 6200. Previous NMHU HIST 620.

HIST 6400. Seminar: Modern Mexico (3); Var
This course consists of research and writing on Mexican topics. Previous NMHU HIST 640.

HIST 6920. Independent Research (1 – 4 VC); Var
Independent, directed study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU HIST 692.

HIST 6960. Professional Paper (3); Var
The Professional Paper provides an opportunity for students to apply graduate level research and writing skills to a historical topic chosen in consultation with their adviser. Students who have chosen the Professional Paper option will generally enroll in History 6960 during the last semester of graduate study during which time they will complete their paper and schedule an oral defense with their selected committee members. Previous NMHU HIST 696.

HIST 6990. Thesis (1 – 8 VC); Var
Individual research and writing in preparation for a graduate thesis. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU HIST 699.

Interdepartmental courses (INDP) 

  1. Research Ethics and Integrity (1); 1; FA
    In this seminar course we will discuss contemporary issues in research ethics and integrity.  We will examine relevant case material, and use this to outline the value conflicts inherent in research.  We will spend a lot of time discussing grey areas of the field, where it is unclear whether or how the research should progress.  Finally, we will try to develop a clear understanding how the federal guidelines apply to the decisions made by Institutional Review Boards. Previous NMHU INDP 692.

Courses in International Business (INTB)

INTB 5800. Doing Business in the Spanish-Speaking World (3); Var
The goal of this course is to expose students to how business is conducted in different Spanish-speaking countries. The course requires students and their professor to visit numerous businesses as well as major cultural destinations in the country. The course exposes students to various kinds of business, but focuses on those involved in international commerce. Students are required to observe, describe and analyze major factors affecting business in the country and propose courses of action that business should consider to effectively compete in international markets. Previous NMHU INTB 580.

INTB 6400. International Business (3); Fa
This course introduces MBA students to key elements of international business, including factors influencing management decision making in an international setting. It explores managerial response to the economics, political, cultural, and social factors shaping business and contrasts the success potential and operations of internationally focused companies to those that are solely focused on the domestic market. Previous NMHU INTB 640. 

Courses in Management (MGMT) 

MGMT 5310. Entrepreneurial Forum (3); Fa, Sp
Ownership and operation of one’s own business is an overwhelming drive for many people. This course explores starting a business, including understanding the right questions to ask about all aspects of business operations, such as financing, buying, sales and marketing, cost considerations, cash conversion concepts, product and service delivery, customer service, personnel issues, pricing policies, accounting and financial record keeping, and reporting for start-up purposes and for planning for future success. Previous NMHU MGMT 531.

MGMT 5510. Entrepreneurship (3); Fa, Sp
An advanced study of entrepreneurship, new business ventures, and professional resources available for aspiring entrepreneurs. Particular attention is given to the development of the business concept and its implementation through the development of a business plan.

MGMT 5530. Organizational Leadership (3); Fa, Sp
This course is designed to address the fundamental aspects of leading and motivating people. It includes understanding and working with people individually, as well as in groups. Students study high performance organizations and challenges of leading change in organizations and identify their own leadership traits. Previous NMHU MGMT 553.

MGMT 6010. Quantitative Methods (3); Fa, Sp, Su
This course introduces graduate students to quantitative and qualitative analytical techniques used in contemporary business research. Previous NMHU MGMT 601.

MGMT 6040. Business Research Methods (3); Fa, Sp, Su
This course applies quantitative and qualitative techniques used in business and economics research. Students conceptualize, plan, and implement a formal research project using standard research methodology, Students analyze and discuss results in a formal technical report. Prerequisite: MGMT 6010. Previous NMHU MGMT 604.

MGMT 6210. Business and Society (3); Fa, Sp, Su
This course is an introduction to ethical decision making in business. Students examine moral principles and standards that are available to guide behavior in the world of business. Students use normative and descriptive ethical decision-making frameworks to analyze ethical issues that business managers confront. Previous NMHU MGMT 621.

MGMT 6640. Organizational Theory (3); Fa, Sp
Analysis of formal organizations and informal relationships among individuals and small groups. This course stresses the study of business organization as a system of authority and status, control and communication, decision-making centers, and leadership positions. Use is made of cases and research studies. Previous NMHU MGMT 664.

MGMT 6650. Personnel Practices and the Law (3); Sp
This course addresses the increasing role of the law in personnel functions by familiarizing students with the Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) and personnel law. Such topics as the Family Medical Leave Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act will be discussed as they relate to personnel practices. Previous NMHU MGMT 665.

MGMT 6870. Human Resources Management (3); Fa, Sp
The study of human resources management issues, including management theory, and labor law from the manager’s perspective. Previous NMHU MGMT 687.

MGMT 6890. Business Strategy (3); Fa, Sp, Su
This course exposes students to the theory and practice of strategic management as practiced by business firms and other organizations. The course requires students to analyze business case studies. Must be taken in the last semester for the program. Prerequisite: MGMT 6040, 6210, BFIN 6070 and MKTG 6840. Previous NMHU MGMT 689. 

Courses in Management Information Systems (BMIS)

BMIS 5800. Project Management (3); Fa, Sp
This course will cover project management methodologies and techniques used by industry leaders. Furthermore, students will participate in class discussions about ‘real-world’ work related situations that involve innovation, problem solving, and effective project management. BMIS 5800 will feature a series of case studies that will present students with various business scenarios related to course content. Previous NMHU MIS 580. 

Courses in Marketing (MKTG) 

MKTG 5150. Consumer Behavior (3); Sp
A seminar studying how individuals make buying decisions. It focuses on the psychological, sociological, behavioral, and cultural aspects of the buying decision and on how firms can use this information to sell more effectively in the marketplace. The course will emphasize current research in the field of consumer behavior. Previous NMHU MKTG 515.

MKTG 5460. Social Media (3), Sp
Social media represents one of the most significant changes in consumer media behavior hi history, resulting in fundamental shifts in the way marketers communicate and interact with consumers. This course provides the practical knowledge and insights required to establish objectives and strategies, properly select the social media platforms to engage consumers, and monitor and measure the results of these efforts. Previous NMHU MKTG 546.

MKTG 5730. Advertising (3); Fa, Sp
This course examines the role of advertising and promotion in a firm’s integrated marketing communications strategy. Traditional advertising functions and strategies are analyzed along with new forms of advertising and promotion driven by changing technology. Previous NMHU MKTG 573.

MKTG 5740. International Marketing (3); Sp
Objectives, problems, and challenges facing those who engage in marketing operations in foreign countries. Foreign marketing organizations, cultural dynamics, trade channels, the legal environment, and political considerations are examined. Previous NMHU MKTG 574.

MKTG 5890. Strategic Brand Marketing (3); Fa
This course will offer an overview of brands, branding, brand strategy, brand portfolios and brand management. Students will examine how to create and maintain strong brands and brand portfolios. Previous NMHU MKTG 589.

MKTG 6510. Managerial Approach to Internet Marketing Strategies (3); Fa, Sp
This course focuses on a managerial approach to internet marketing strategies. Students will be introduced to the most current managerial tactics and trends in the field of internet marketing. Students will gain an appreciation for consumer behavior in a digital world, communication via traditional and emerging media, business analytics, strategic planning, problem solving and decision making. Previous NMHU MKTG 651.

MKTG 6840. Marketing Management (3); Fa, Sp, Su
The approaches and problems of marketing decision making, considered from the standpoint of the marketing manager. Previous NMHU MKTG 684. 

Courses in Mathematics (MATH) 

MATH 5010. Discrete Chaos and Fractals (3); Fa, Sp
This course is an introduction to fractal geometry and discrete dynamics in one dimension. Topics include stability of one-dimensional maps, periodic points, bifurcations, period three orbis, Sharkovsky’s theorem, Schwarzian derivative, chaos in one, metric spaces, transitivity, conjugacy, fractals, fractal dimension, Julia and Mandelbrot sets. Previous NMHU MATH 501.

MATH 5020. Discrete Dynamical Systems and Chaos (3); Fa, Sp
This course is a continuation of MATH 401 in higher dimensions. Topics include discrete linear dynamical systems, orbits, stability, spectral decomposition theorem, affine systems, nonlinear dynamical systems, bounded invariance, global stability of fixed points, sinks, repellers and saddles, bifuraction, attractors, Li-Yorke chaos, hyperbolic Anosov toral automorphism, and more on fractal dimension. Prerequisite: MATH 5010 with a minimum grade of C. Previous NMHU MATH 5020.

MATH 5040. Intro to Numerical Analysis (3); Fa, Sp
This course is an introduction to numerical methods for determining the roots of nonlinear equations, numerical interpolation and integration, and numerical methods for approximating solutions to ordinary differential equations. Prerequisite: MATH 3200, and MATH 3250 and permission of instructor. Previous NMHU MATH 504.

MATH 5060. College Geometry (4); 3, 2 Fa, Sp
This course is a rigorous treatment of the elements of Euclidean geometry and hyperbolic geometry. Prerequisite: Previous NMHUMATH 506.

MATH 5070. Mathematical Models (3); Fa, Sp
This course is an overview of model construction with many different examples. The course includes differential equations, Markov chains, linear programming, zero sum games, graphs, and queues, with computer simulations of some of the above. Previous NMHU MATH 507.

MATH 5100. Optimization Techniques (3); Fa, Sp
This course is a study of unconstrained and constrained optimization computational algorithms. Previous NMHU MATH 510.

MATH 5150. Intro to Cryptography (3); Fa, Sp
This is an introductory course on the mathematics of cryptography. Topics include column transposition, monoalphabetic and polyalphabetic ciphers, the one-time pad, the Hill cipher, and cipher machines. Prerequisite: Previous NMHU MATH 515.

MATH 5170. Mathematical Statistics II (3); Fa, Sp
This course is a continuation of MATH 3450 covering the topics of contingency tables, multiple regression, analysis of variance, and other special topics in mathematical statistics including multivariate topics. Previous NMHU MATH 517.

MATH 5190. Modern Methods of Cryptography (3); Fa, Sp
This course is a study of modern methods of cryptography and their applications. Topics include the Data Encryption Standard, the RSA public-key cryptosystem, digital signatures, and quantum cryptography. Prerequisite: MATH 5150 with a grade of C or better. Previous NMHU MATH 519.

MATH 5250. Introduction to Real Analysis (3); Fa, Sp
This course gives students a solid background in theoretical graduate analysis, stressing the theory and deeper understanding of calculus. Students are introduced to proofs that motivate them toward clear thought and understanding of limits, continuity, differentiation, and series. This provides a rigorous training in mathematical thinking. Previous NMHU MATH 525.

MATH 5260. Intro to Complex Variable (3); Fa, Sp
This course is an introduction to the properties of analytic functions. Topics include mappings, limits, continuity, differentiation, Cauchy-Riemann equations, harmonic functions and branch points, definite integrals and the Cauchy-Goursat theorem, Cauchy integral formula, maximum modulus theorem, Liouville’s theorem, fundamental theorem of algebra, Taylor and Laurent series, residues and poles, analytic continuation and Poisson integral. Prerequisite: MATH 5250 with a minimum grade of C. Previous NMHU MATH 526.

MATH 5320. Abstract Algebra (3); Fa, Sp
Topics from groups, rings, and field theory. Previous NMHU MATH 532.

MATH 5350. Selected Topic in Mathematics (1 –4 VC); Fa, Sp
Course in a topic or topics in mathematics. May be repeated with change of content. Previous NMHU MATH 535.

MATH 5440. Matrix Theory with Applications (3); Fa, Sp
This course is a study of advanced topics in linear algebra and the theory of matrices with emphasis on computer-based applications. Topics include eigenvalues, eigenvectors, similarity, characteristic and minimal polynomials, diagonalizable matrices, and symmetric matrices, Jordan canonical form, vector and matrix norms, spectral radius, stable matrices, functions of matrices, nonnegative matrices and Perron-Frobenius theory, differential equations, stability, location of eigenvalues, Rayleigh quotient and Gersgorin’s theorem, matric polynomials, solvents and analytic matrix functions. Previous NMHU MATH 544.

MATH 5500. Seminar in Mathematics (1 –4 VC); Fa, Sp
Seminar course in a topic or topics in mathematics. Previous NMHU MATH 550.

MATH 5600. Applied Multivariate Statistics I (3); Fa, Sp
This course is an introductory matrix analysis for statistics, multivariate distributions, multiple regression, multiple analysis of variance and covariance, principal component analysis, and canonical correlations. Prerequisite: MATH 3200. A continuation of MATH 5500, including discriminant analysis, factor analysis, categorical techniques, distance concepts, and cluster analysis. Prerequisite: MATH 5500. Previous NMHU MATH 560.

MATH 5900. Independent Study (1 –4 VC); Fa, Sp
Independent study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU MATH 590.

MATH 5920. Independent Research (1 –4 VC); Fa, Sp
Individual, directed research arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.  Previous NMHU MATH 592. 

Courses in Media Arts (MART) 

MART 5050. Digital Painting (3); Fa
A course designed for students interested in learning how to use Corel Painter and the Wacom table tools to enhance their digital art skills. Painter is a digital studio application that aims to recreate the analog tools of an artist’s studio, painting, ink drawing, pastels, and other techniques. Previous NMHU MART 505.

MART 5110. Graphics and Meaning (3); Fa, Var
This course introduces a pictorial media design process of conveying messages through concept development and visual narrative problem solving. Students will explore semiotics and graphic forms within social and cultural contexts, and reinterpret meaning using images, icons and shapes. Prerequisite: MART 5730. Previous NMHU MART 511.

MART 5120.  History of Design (3) Var
Course covers the pivotal aesthetic, cultural, economic, political, religious, propaganda/ideologic and technological influences of visual communication throughout recorded human history. Material spans ancient pictograms through the present modern era of digital design and intends to provide an essential base of historical knowledge, surveying numerous important cultural zeitgeists, including: typography, color, layout, illustration, photography and motion graphics. Prerequisites:  6 credits of writing.

MART 5130. Non-Linear Digital Video Editing (3); Sp
The study of video editing techniques and systems which have emerged from the intersection of television and computer techniques. Previous NMHU MART 513.

MART 5150. Design Projects for the Community (3); Var
This course focuses on developing critical thinking skills for relating media content and for understanding how social and cultural issues impact public perceptions and behaviors. Through advocacy of a non-commercial cause, students will explore the many facets of an issue, identify key points to impact public appeal, develop a media promotional strategy, and employ visual communication skills to promote social change. Previous NMHU MART 515.

MART 5170. Publication Design (3); Sp
A comprehensive study covering the design process of page architecture and information hierarchy for the production of print and digital multi-page formats such as book, magazine, newspaper and scree-based publications. Previous NMHU MART 517.

MART 5180. Principles of Multimedia (3); Fa
Learning the basic principles and applications used to create interactive animated movies, games and websites. Previous NMHU MART 518.

MART 5220. HD Cinema Workshop (3); Sp
An advanced production course focusing on documentary and narrative video production as well as high-definition cinema production tools.

MART 5260. Multimedia Project Management (3); Alt, Sp, Odd
Through working on a creative team, you will learn how to interact with clients, manage exhibition and project content, information flow, budget, and production schedule, and master the art of problem solving and trouble-shooting. Previous NMHU MART 526.

MART 5270. Web Production Workshop (3); 2, 2 Fa
An introduction to producing websites, planning a website and using HTML, JavaScript, and dynamic HTML in the Dreamweaver authoring environment. Previous NMHU MART 527.

MART 5340. Practicum (3); Var
A course designed to let graduate students develop leadership on multimedia projects. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. Previous NMHU MART 534.

MART 5350. ST: Selected Topics in Media Arts (1 – 4 VC); Var
Course in a topic or topics in media arts. May be repeated with a change of content. Previous NMHU MART 535.

MART 5360. Experimental Video Production (3); Var
In this course students will explore approaches to and aspects of experimental storytelling using advanced high-definition video. Students will learn the basics of project proposal writing as well as how to secure funding and seek distribution for experimental projects.

MART 5380. Advanced Multimedia Project Management (3); Alt, Sp, Odd
The program for Interactive Cultural Technology is a full semester, 16-week, immersive academic and hands-on program designed to prepare students for careers as multimedia professionals in museums, cultural organization, & exhibition design businesses. PICT students help create a professional exhibition for an elite institution & participate in professional internships. Graduates receive a Certificate in Cultural Technology from NMHU & the NM Dept. of Cultural Affairs. Through readings, class discussions, field trips & guest presentations, you will gain a mastery of exhibition content, the principles of exhibition design, the design of physical spaces, static & interactive exhibit elements and how to combine design, construction & multimedia skills. Through readings, class discussions, field trips and guest presentations, you will gain a mastery of exhibition content, the principles of exhibition design, the design of physical spaces, static and interactive exhibit elements and how to combine design, construction and multimedia skills. Prerequisite: MART 3500 or 5180. Previous NMHU MART 538.

MART 5460. Screenwriting (3); Fa
The study of the format, the writing styles, and the creative and technical techniques useful in the development of the dramatics screenplay for television and film. Previous NMHU MART 546.

MART 5470. Digital Photography III (3); Sp
This class introduces students to skills that are imperative in professional photography: studio lighting, portraiture, product photography, and macro photography. The techniques learned in this class will be introduced through lectures about historical and contemporary photographers and photographic movements. Professional modes of presentation, such as matting, framing, shipping, and archival treatments for gallery and commercial settings, will be addressed as well. This course is structured with assumption that you will create a sound, professional portfolio of work that is presentation ready by the end of the semester.

MART 5490. Digital Photography 4: Photographic Installation (3); Var
This class explores the ever-evolving area of interactive photography. Starting with an introduction to 3D imagery through stereoscope and lenticular photography, the course will introduce students to new ways of thinking about photography as an interactive rather than an indexical tool. Students will research on contemporary photographic installation artists and will present their academic findings in the form of an oral presentation. The final class project will culminate in the creation of a photographic installation that uses at least one form of interactivity. Students will learn how to write professional artist’s statements to accompany their work and how to document their work. Prerequisite: 5740. Previous NMHU MART 549.

MART 5560. Physical Computing (3); 2, 2 Sp
This course focuses on physically interactive technology, enabling student’s work to sense and respond to its environment. This course is geared toward people interested in exploring new possibilities for screen-based and installation art, robotics, and “smart” architecture. The course begins with the basic theories of electronics and leads to fully functional interactive projects which react to physical interactions. Students build a series of working prototypes. Previous NMHU MART 556.

MART 5570. Surround and Installation Workshop (3); Var
The course prepares students to create multi-media, interactive audio installations. Works for gallery and public art installation are given special emphasis in this course. Prerequisite: MART 3660, 3260, or 3180.   Previous NMHU MART 557.

MART 5590. Advanced Interactive Multimedia (3); Fa
A course designed for students interested in advanced multimedia and web development. This course is designed to relate directly to current professional standards in multimedia, interaction and web production. Previous NMHU MART 559.

MART 5600. Alternative Photographic Techniques (3); Var
This course will focus on alternative processes and techniques: light box imagery, lazertran, imagery on silk, digital negatives, and cyanotypes. Students will also explore creative shooting options: hola cameras and lens babies. Throughout the semester students will examine and evaluate how alternative photographic techniques can be used to extend the meaning of a piece. Previous NMHU MART 560.

MART 5610. Advanced Design Practice (3); Fa
This class is an advanced design class and an advanced practice class. The course projects will focus on targeting audiences, in a cohesive manner, with print, web, and interactive materials. How to identify users and buyers will be presented. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU MART 561.

MART 5620. Video Effects (3); Var
The study of digital video, post-production techniques, such as chroma key production, image morphing, and video composing. Previous NMHU MART 562. 

MART 5630. Video Animation (3); 2, 2 Var
The study of 3D animation and modeling, using LightWave. Previous NMHU MART 563.

MART 5640. Advanced Digital Cinema (3); Var
A capstone course in video production that requires the student to write, produce and direct a professional quality video piece. Prerequisite: MART 5360 or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU MART 564.

MART 5660. Audio for Video (3); Var
The course prepares students to create multi-track audio for layered use in a variety of common video and multimedia programs. Digital audio tools are given special emphasis. Previous NMHU MART 566.

MART 5670. Character Animation (3); Var
This course focuses on character animation. Students will develop their skills in 2D and clay animation by learning the concepts of storyboarding, character movement, walk cycles, facial expression, audio syncing, and camera angles. Previous NMHU MART 567.

MART 5690. Advanced Video Animation (3); Var
The study of advanced techniques of LightWave animation, including the use of metanurbs, inverse kinematics, multiple-target morphine, and quasi-cel animation. Prerequisite: MART 3630 or MART 5630. Previous NMHU MART 569.

MART 5700. Advanced Design Practice 2 (3); Var

This class is an advanced design class, placing an advanced practice class-placing an emphasis on process as well as client relations. The curriculum will focus on accurately targeting audiences, for professional clients using print, web, and interactive materials. Students will learn how to most effectively position a unique brand in the market. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. Previous NMHU MART 570.

MART 5720. Distributed Network Production (3); Var
An advanced course in development and production for distributed networks, such as the internet, social networks, and other methods of networked communication and delivery. Prerequisite: MART 5270. Previous NMHU MART 572.

MART 5730. Typography (3); Var
A study to typographic form and usage. The course covers the design and appropriateness of letter form systems in the communication process. Previous NMHU MART 573.

MART 5750. Advanced Screenwriting Workshop (3); Fa
The goal of advanced screenwriting is to establish a workshop atmosphere where students can delve seriously and intently into the discussion of each other’s work. Students will be expected to complete a feature-length screenplay. Prerequisite: MART 5460. Previous NMHU MART 575.

MART 5770. Typography II (3); Fa
This course explores the area of kinetic typography, an industry standard media form commonly seen in broadcast television media and film. A basic understanding of typography should have already been explored, as students will use their knowledge of vector-based software as a springboard for effects software. Animation on track paths, light, and camera angles come into play. Conceptual studies of environment-specific design will also be assessed and studied. Prerequisite: MART 5730. Previous NMHU MART 577.

MART 5900. Independent Study (1 – 4 VC); Var
Individual study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU MART 590.

MART 5940. Cultural Technology Mentorship (1 – 4); Var
A course designed to help students develop leadership skills and complete the necessary training for an AmeriCorps placement. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. Previous NMHU MART 594.

MART 5950. Exhibition Design (3); Alt, Sp, Odd
The Program for Interactive Cultural Technology (PICT) is a full-semester, 16 week immersive academic & hands-on program designed to prepare students for careers as multimedia professionals in museums, cultural organizations, and exhibition design businesses. PICT students help create a professional exhibition for an elite institution & participate in professional internships. Through readings, class discussions, field trips & guest presentations, you will gain a mastery of exhibition content, the principles of exhibition design, the design of physical spaces, static & interactive exhibit elements and how to combined design, construction & multimedia skills. Prerequisite: MART 5150 or 5730. Previous NMHU MART 595.

MART 5960. Advanced Exhibition Design (3); Alt, Sp, Odd
This advanced course is for students who have already taken Exhibition Design. In this class students will expand their understanding of designing in a physical space, static and interactive elements, and combining design, construction and multimedia skills to produce a final exhibit for the public. Prerequisite: MART 5950 or Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU MART 596.

MART 6000. Principles of Media Arts and Computer Science (3); Fa
An interdisciplinary investigation of the terminology, roots, assumptions and principles that underlie the merging disciplines of media arts and computer science. Cross-listed as CS 6000. Previous NMHU MART 600.

MART 6100. Synthesis of Media Arts and Computer Science (3); Sp
An interdisciplinary synthesis of the principles that underlie the merging disciplines of computer science and media arts. Cross-listed as CS 6100. Previous NMHU MART 610.

MART 6180. History of Media Seminar (3); Fa
This course explores the basic concept of invention as it pertains to a creative digital environment, and the role that new technology plays in society. How have we evolved to use and interpret technology? Students will examine, research and write about important moments in computing and media history to query: How does the evolution of technology impact a culture-from banal moments of everyday life to global concerns on a much larger scale? Lectures, readings, and research, discussions and presentations will cover important artists, movements and works that have inspired, influenced and marked precedence for creators up until today. Current and former theoretical positions of art and media criticism will be exampled to assist students in forming their own approaches and opinions. Previous NMHU MART 618.

MART 6200. Multimedia Project Development (3); Fa
A study of the processes, techniques, and tools used in the development of sophisticated multimedia-based projects. The course focuses on both the theoretical and practical aspects of multimedia design and programming. A key component to the course is the completion of a project that combines the various tools and techniques discussed in the course. The course will also involve student presentations on the research related to their thesis or project. Cross-listed as CS 6200. Previous NMHU MART 620.

MART 6210. Studio I (3); Fa
This first studio class explores conceptual and procedural frameworks that guide the creative process in order to address our needs in relationship to the current demands of technology culture. The focus will be on contextualizing ideas in reaction or in relation to existing movements. Students will combine critical thinking with hands-on and experimental practice. This semester, students will be expected to embark on and begin exploring their MFA body of work. Previous MART 621.

MART 6220. Studio II (3); Sp
Following-up on initial creative and conceptual process, graduate students will take their initial direction and begin building a body of work. They will spend time articulating, contextualizing, and defending their ideas, develop a conceptual focus, and begin refining their MFA body of work. Prerequisites: MART 6210. Previous MART 622.

MART 6230. Studio III (3); Fa
This class follows the Studio II course.  Graduate students will hone, build, construct, critique and propose a body of work for their final show. They will continue to refine the articulation and craftsmanship of their work in context with the world around them. Aiming to defend their ideas as original and potentially groundbreaking in nature. At the conclusion of the course, each student’s proposal must be approved in order to advance in the program. Prerequisites: MART 6210 and 6220. Previous MART 623.

MART 6240. Studio IV (3-6 VC); Var
This studio class is the final studio course in the MFA path. Graduate students will prepare, round out, complete and document their final, resolved body of work with the intention of display in an approved format (public exhibition, online gallery and/or printed publication). Students will prepare and plan to practice orally defending and presenting their final project, and submit a written support document to their advisors. Prerequisites: MART 6210, 6220, 6230. Previous MART 624.

MART 6310. Media Theory (3); Var
This course begins a critical discourse on aesthetic and culturally-based media. The class will be dedicated to interactive media with regards to interfaces. Informational architecture and visualization will be covered and defined in relationship to human psychology of communication and will be geared to address semiotic visual messages; from individual signs and symbols to larger network systems. We will explore and justify why certain visual and interactive models are successful while others are unsuccessful. What needs to occur between creator and user to ensure that proper actions are being followed? Previous MART 631.

MART 6550. Critical Practice I (3); Fa, Sp
This is a combination studio and seminar course that presents, questions and interprets our own objectivity and social relationships, consumerism and the cultural reception of media. These interpretations will be related contextually to cultural institutions, artists, techniques, emerging technologies, media and movements and then applied collaboratively to practice by selecting a particular cause for a public cultural project, with the goal of using it to display, demonstrate and inform an understanding of diversity, ethics, accessibility and social responsibility. Prerequisites: second semester MFA standing. Previous MART 655.

MART 6560. Critical Practice II (3); Fa, Sp
This repeatable elective course content is specifically geared towards supporting students interested in teaching at the higher level. In consultation with their mentor/advisor, the graduate student will be assigned an appropriate teaching assistantship position and work directly with an instructor in order to learn pedagogical methods related to teaching in a media studio environment. TAs will strengthen presentation and problem-solving skills, learn to design effective hands-on project assignments, how to manage a critique, and best practices for evaluation of media work. In addition, they will articulate and share personal research with the aim of publishing it professionally. Prerequisites: second semester MFA standing, and MART 6550. Course is repeatable. Previous NMHU MART 656.

MART 6920. Research & Writing I (3); Fa, Sp
This initial course explores the principles and content of technical writing with a focus on audience and purpose and will prepare students to effectively present, discuss, compare, analyze and interpret media work in various formats. As technical communicators, you must be able to craft varied messages concerning changing and integrated media, and how to convey your written ideas to diverse audiences. This course is designed to prepare a student for the sound formation and groundwork for their central approach to writing the MFA thesis draft, and will focus on a combination of refined, focused and targeted readings as well as extensive writing, editing, citation and studio practice research. Prerequisites: year 3 MFA standing, MART 6180, 6550, 6560, 6310, 6210, 6220, at least 6 elective credits, and MFA qualifying thesis presentation/review. Course is repeatable. Previous NMHU MART 692.

MART 6920. Research & Writing (3); Fa, Sp
This secondary course explores the principles and content of technical writing with a focus on audience and purpose and will prepare students to effectively present, discuss, compare, analyze and interpret media work in various formats. As technical communicators, you must be able to craft varied messages concerning changing and integrated media, and how to convey your written ideas to diverse audiences. This course is designed to prepare a student for the sound formation and groundwork for their central approach to writing the MFA thesis draft, and will focus on a combination of refined, focused and targeted readings as well as extensive writing, editing, citation and studio practice research. Prerequisites: year 3 MFA standing, MART 6180, 6550, 6560, 6310, 6210, 6220, at least 6 elective credits, and MFA qualifying thesis presentation/review. Course is repeatable. Previous NMHU MART 692.

MART 6970. Field Project (1 – 6 VC); Var
Individual field research and writing in preparation of a graduate field project (equivalent to a thesis). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU MART 697.

MART 6980. Cultural Technology Internship I (3); Var
The first segment of a two-semester professional internship between NMHU students and New Mexico cultural institutions. This course is designed to support students as they gain practical technology experience, engage with current trends in emerging technology, and critical thinking through research, reflection papers and working with industry professionals. Students will collaborate with their advisors and on-site mentor to explore best practices and accessibility in cultural organizations.  Previous NMHU MART 698.

MART 6980. Cultural Technology Internship II (3); Var
The second segment of a two-semester professional internship between NMHU students and New Mexico cultural institutions. Students will refine and develop practical experience and critical thinking in emerging cultural technology. Students will continue to collaborate with their advisors and industry professionals to synthesize their research and/or projects, actively mentor first semester students, present original research and apply best practices and accessibility in cultural organizations. Prerequisites: Completion of first year MFA status, repeat for credit after completion of MART 698, Cultural Technology Internship I. Previous NMHU MART 698.

MART 6990. Thesis (1 – 6 VC); Fa, Sp
Under the guidance of their primary mentor and advisory committee, students will work on completion of individual research, writing, documentation and editing in preparation of the finished graduate thesis that is designed to accompany, defend and support the final public MFA studio body of work/exhibition. Course is repeatable. Prerequisites: Year 3 MFA standing, MART 6180, 6310, 6210, 6220, 6920, 6550, 6560, and at least 6 credits of Media Arts electives. Previous NMHU MART 699. 

Courses in Philosophy (PHIL) 

PHIL 5000. Major Philosophers (3); Var
This course is a study of a major philosopher’s work. Examples of possible offerings are the pre-Socratics, Socrates and Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Descartes, Spinoza, Locke, Hume, Kant, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Bergson, Kierkegaard, Heidegger, Sartre, Husserl, Wittgenstein, Merleau-Ponty, and others. May be repeated with change of content. Previous NMHU PHIL 500.

PHIL 5050. Major Philosophical Movements (3); Var
This course is a study of a major philosophical movement or philosophy. Examples of possible offerings are analytic philosophy, phenomenology, process philosophy, logical positivism, ethics, epistemology, and the philosophy of negation. May be repeated with change of content. Previous NMHU PHIL 505.

PHIL 5250. Reasoning Skills for the Schools (3); Var
This course is a general introduction to the basic skills involved in reasoning and critical thinking, and how they may be incorporated into the curricula of the schools. Previous NMHU PHIL 525.

PHIL 5300. Scientific Reasoning (3); Var
This course is an examination of the general structure of scientific reasoning, including the logic of discovery, explanation, theory building, and decision making. Previous NMHU PHIL 530.

PHIL 5350. Selected Topic in Philosophy (1 – 4 VC); Var
Course in a topic or topics in philosophy. May be repeated with change of content. Previous NMHU PHIL 535.

PHIL 5400. Philosophy of Art and Aesthetics (3); Var
This course is an advanced study of the theoretical grounds for various philosophic theories of art, and their consequences for the world of art and art criticism. Previous NMHU PHIL 5400.

PHIL 5500. Seminar in Philosophy (1 – 4 VC); Var
Seminar course in topic or topics in philosophy. Previous NMHU PHIL 550.

PHIL 5720. Cognitive Science (3); Var
This course is an interdisciplinary investigation of the foundations of human knowledge, representation and understanding, the functioning of the human brain, and how these impact recent computer technologies. Cross-listed as: PSY 5720 and CS 5720. Previous NMHU PHIL 572.

PHIL 5840. Philosophy of History (3); Var
This course is a chronological survey of the development of the concept of history and its philosophical foundations. Cross-listed as: HIST 5840. Previous NMHU PHIL 584.

PHIL 5900. Independent Study (1 – 4 VC); Var
Individual, directed study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Previous NMHU PHIL 590.

Courses in Political Science (POLS) 

POLS 5020. Interests Groups (3); Var
The forms, tactics, and influence of interest groups, their role in a pluralistic society, and their importance in a democracy is covered. Previous NMHU POLS 502.

POLS 5100. The American Constitution (3); Var
This course covers the origin and establishment of leading constitutional doctrines. Previous NMHU POLS 510.

POLS 5150. Government and Business (3); Var
This is a case study of United States government regulations of economic activity, with emphasis on the administrative process. Previous NMHU POLS 515.

POLS 5170. The Legislative Process (3); Var
This course explores the process of national and state law-making in the United States, legislation drafting and legislative procedure. Previous NMHU POLS 517.

POLS 5180. Administrative Law and Procedure (3); Var
This course will help students become aware of administrative law and its relationship to public administrative programs. Administrative law concerns the powers and procedures of administrative agencies, particularly including the law governing judicial review of administrative action. Political science majors who endeavor to enter the public administration arena often will be involved in the administrative process, which is a complex of methods by which agencies carry out the tasks of adjudication, rule-making and related functions. Previous NMHU POLS 518.

POLS 5190. Public Administration (3); Var
This course explores the organization of the administrative structure, problems of internal management, personnel, fiscal management, forms of administrative action, and procedure. Previous NMHU POLS 519.

POLS 5200. Research Methods in Political Science (3); Sp
This course acquaints students with a wide variety of research methods used to analyze political phenomena, emphasizing quantitative approaches through the introduction of statistical computing using statistical packages such as SPSS. Previous NMHU POLS 520.

POLS 5330. Chinese Communist Government (3); Var
This course is an analysis of the Chinese government with emphasis on the role of the Communist Party; relationship of policies to tradition and world affairs. Previous NMHU POLS 533.

POLS 5340. Practicum (1 – 4 VC); Var
Experiential study directed by an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU POLS 534.

POLS 5350 – 6350. Selected Topic in Political Science (1 – 4 VC); Var
A course in a topic or topics in political science. May be repeated with change of content. Previous NMHU POLS 535 – 635.

POLS 5460 Government and Politics of Latin America (3); Var
This course is an analysis of political systems, contemporary mass movements, and inter-American relations. Previous NMHU POLS 546.

POLS 5500 – 6500. Seminar in Political Science (1 – 4 VC); Var
A seminar course in a topic or topics in political science. Previous NMHU POLS 550 – 650.

POLS 5510. Seminar: New Mexico Government and Politics (3); Var
A seminar course in the structure, organization, function, and operation of New Mexico state and local government. Previous NMHU POLS 551.

POLS 5530. International Relations, Human Rights, and International Law (3); Var
A theoretical and critical analysis of the meaning and relevancy of the IR politics and its collision with international law and human rights in the age of globalization. Prerequisite: POLS 3530, or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU POLS 553.

POLS 5580. Political Theory and Philosophy (3); Var
This course explores leading political ideas of the Western world. Previous NMHU POLS 558.

POLS 5600. The American and Russian Systems (3); Var
A comparative study of the American and Russian political institutions, cultures, and structures, including their underlying belief systems. Previous NMHU POLS 560.

POLS 5620. International Monetary Systems (3); Var
This course is an examination of the national and international procedural rules which channel the behavior of governments and monetary authorities. Previous NMHU POLS 562. 

POLS 5630. Political Economy (3); Var
This course is a comparative study and analysis of the political economies of the major countries of the world, stressing the interdependence of the study of economics and politics. Previous NMHU POLS 563. 

POLS 6110. Seminar: Southwest Politics (3); Var
This course is an analysis and original research on southwest politics, with emphasis on New Mexico, and ethnic politics. Previous NMHU POLS 611.

POLS 6140. Seminar: Public Policies (3) Var
Past and present governmental attempts in the United States to deal with vital problems in such areas as education, health, poverty, and civil strife are covered in this course. Previous NMHU POLS 614.

POLS 6200. Research Methods in History and Political Science (3) Fall
This course explores research methods in political science, including sources, criticism, tools, organization, form, and problems. Cross-listed as: HIST 6200. Previous NMHU POLS 620. 

POLS 6540. Seminar: The State (3); Var
The essence, origin, justification, and functions of the nation state. Previous NMHU POLS 654.

POLS 6900. Independent Study (1 – 4 VC); Var
Independent study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU POLS 690.

POLS 6920. Independent Research (1 – 4 VC); Var
Independent research arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU POLS 692.

POLS 6950. Comprehensive Examination (3); Var
This course prepares graduate students for the Comprehensive Examination in the Master of Arts Concentration in Political and Governmental Processes. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU POLS 695.

POLS 6960. Professional Paper (3); Var
The Professional Paper provides a unique opportunity for each student to bring together all of the course-work for the MPA degree into a practical application of political phenomena. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. Previous NMHU POLS 696.

POLS 6990. Thesis (1 – 8 VC); Var
Individual research and writing in preparation for a graduate thesis. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU POLS 699.

Courses in Psychology (PSYC) 

PSYC 5020. Psychology of Sports Performance (3); Var
Psychological and social-psychological factors affecting sports performance. Specific attention will be given to the relationship between sports performance and motivation, personality, aggression, and attitudes. The social processes of social facilitation, observational learning, social reinforcement, and competition will also be viewed in relation to their effect upon the individual’s sports performance. Previous NMHU PSY 502.

PSYC 5050. Positive Psychology (3); Var
This course will provide an overview of the dynamic field of positive psychology. What does that mean? Positive psychology is oriented to the study of optimal human performance, quality relationships, well-being, and flourishing. How can we be happy? How can we enhance our own lives and the lives of others? How can we be creative, productive, satisfied, and live meaningful lives? These are a few of the questions we would like to tackle in this course. Previous NMHU PSY 505. 

PSYC 5080. Drugs and Behavior (3); Sp
This course will focus on psychoactive drugs, or drugs that influence how people think, feel, or behave. Because this is fundamentally a biological psychology course, it will focus primarily on the physiological action of drugs, including how they influence brain functioning and, consequently, behavior. It will examine the addictive potential of drugs, the neurological and psychological mechanisms by which drugs become addictive, and treatments for drug abuse. Previous NMHU PSY 508.

PSYC 5090. Domestic and Sexual Violence (3); Var
This course will focus on physical, sexual, and emotional abuse that occurs within families. A particular emphasis will be a focus on the psychological consequences of exposure to physical and sexual trauma and neglect. Victim and offender characteristics will be discussed in the context of family dynamics. Typical and potential criminal justice system responses will be explored. Previous NMHU PSY 509.

PSYC 5100. Physiological Psychology (3); Fa
An overview of the neuroanatomical and neurophysiological processes underlying behavior. Topics include brain-behavior relationships, neurological disorders, brain organization, sensory systems, language systems, memory systems, sleep, and sexual functioning. Corequisite: PSY 5110. Previous NMHU PSY 510.

PSYC 5110. Techniques in Physiological Psychology (1); Fa
Laboratory work designed to enrich understanding of physiological psychology. Exercises include sheep brain dissection and the use of physiological psychology instruments. Corequisite: PSY 5100. Previous NMHU PSY 511.

PSYC 5160. Motivation and Emotion (3); Var
A review of the major phenomena and theories that relate to motivation and emotion. Prerequisite; Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU PSY 516.

PSYC 5190. Introduction to Behavior Therapy (3); Var
Introduction to and survey of behavior therapy procedures and their application to child and adult populations in a variety of settings including homes, schools, prisons, and hospitals. Previous NMHU PSY 519.

PSYC 5220. Human Sexuality (3); Fa, Even
Review of contemporary, socio-psychological issues relating to human sexuality. Topics include sexual anatomy, sexually-transmitted diseases, sexual dysfunctions, sexual attitudes and mores. Previous NMHU PSY 522.

PSYC 5240. Sport Psychology (3); Var
The overall objective of this course is to identify and understand important psychological concepts related to sport and exercise psychology and application of these concepts to teaching, coaching, and consulting situations. This class focuses on the application of psychological principles of behavior to individuals and groups involved in physical activity. This course examines the questions of how variables influence individuals’ psychological development and how they affect their participation and performance in physical activity. Various mental skills (e.g., imagery, goal setting) will be introduced through discussion of pertinent theory and research. This class is specifically designed to help students begin formulating practical strategies for teaching various psychological skills. The application of knowledge grounded in theory and research will be stressed. Cross-listed with EXSC 5240.

PSYC 5250. Introduction to Group Psychotherapy (3); Su
An overview of group therapy, theory and techniques. Course includes an experiential component designed to provide experience with group process and group leadership. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU PSY 525.

PSYC 5300. Gender Roles (3); Var
An examination of gender roles and role theory in understanding the behavior of women and men. Topics include development, stereotyping, sex differences in personality, abilities, achievement, and status. Attention is given to implications of changing female and male roles in society. Previous NMHU PSY 530.

PSYC 5330. History of Psychology (3); Var
Review of the major figures associated with the development of psychology as a science from Plato’s time to the present, with special emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Prerequisite; Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU PSY 533.

PSYC 5350 – 6350. Selected Topic in Psychology (1 – 4 VC); Var
Course in a topic or topics in psychology: may be repeated with a change of content. Previous NMHU PSY 535-635.

PSYC 5450. Behavior Disorders in Children (3); Var
Etiology and treatment of behavioral problems in children in a variety of settings, including home and school environments. An eclectic coverage of the major theories, approaches, and research is provided. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU PSY 545.

PSYC 5470. Health Psychology (3); Var
This course provides students with an introduction to the field of health psychology. A range of topics within health psychology are explored, including: the biopsychosocial model, relationships between psychological and physical health, stress and coping, psychological effects of and coping with chronic and life-threatening illnesses, psychology’s role in encouraging health-related behaviors or behavior change, and health psychology interventions. Previous NMHU PSY 547.

PSYC 5500 – 6500. Seminar in Psychology (1 – 4 VC); Var
Seminar course in a topic or topics in psychology. May be repeated with a change in content. Previous NMHU PSY 550-650.

PSYC 5660. Psychology of Eyewitness Testimony (3); Fa
This course is designed to provide students with an in-depth examination of the way human memory process impacts a person’s ability to accurately recall the details of various scenarios such as phone conversations, visual identification of individuals involved in a crime, chronological order of events, and more. In addition to internal memory processes, students will be exposed to the many external influences on memory accuracy, which includes pressure from attorneys, threats from acquaintances, implanted memories, etc. Finally, the impact of age, mental disabilities, and emotional disturbances upon the ability to offer accurate eyewitness testimony will be a third focus of this course. This course is particularly salient to psychology and criminal justice majors. Previous NMHU PSY 566.

PSYC 5720. Cognitive Science (3); Var
An interdisciplinary investigation of the foundations of human knowledge representation and understanding, the functioning of the human mind, and how these impact on recent computer technologies. Cross-listed as: PHIL 5720 and CS 5720. Previous NMHU PSY 572.

PSYC 5750. Abnormal Psychology and Literature (3); Var
Characters from many literary works analyzed in terms of psychopathology. Various theories of abnormality will be utilized. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU PSY 575. 

PSYC 5770. Culture and Mental Illness (3); Var
An examination of current descriptions and explanations of mental disorders in a sample of countries from all major regions of the world. Historical, technical, ethical, and pragmatic aspects of international research in the realm of psychology/psychiatry are also addressed. Previous NMHU PSY 577.

PSYC 5800. Community Psychology (3); Var
An introduction to community psychology with emphasis on theories and research regarding prevention and consultation. Previous NMHU PSY 580.

PSYC 5900 – 6900. Independent Study (1 – 4 VC); Var
Individual, directed readings and library research arranged with an instructor on a topic of mutual interest to the student and instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU PSY 590 -690.

PSYC 6010. Data Analysis and Statistics (3); 2, 2 Fa
A comprehensive introduction to the design, analysis, application of psychological data, and experiments. The focus of the course is on the foundation and application of statistical techniques to problems of design and analysis. An introduction to the use of SPSS to analyze data will be included. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in psychology or allied program or permission of instructor and Undergraduate statistics or equivalent. Previous NMHU PSY 601. 

PSYC 6020. Behavioral Research Methods (3); 2, 2 Sp
A comprehensive examination of the language and logic of psychological research. Research designs and strategies for the laboratory, existing social organizations, and field setting are covered. Prerequisite: PSY 6010 or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU PSY 602.

PSYC 6050. Memory and Cognition (3); Sp, Even
An examination of human information processing. Topics include the study of encoding, storage, and retrieval processes in memory. In addition, seminars will be conducted on selected special topics relevant to current issues in cognition, such as false memories, the nature of consciousness, and the issue of “real” versus “artificial” intelligence. Previous NMHU PSY 605.

PSYC 6080. Introduction to Neuropsychology (3); Fa
This course will cover a broad range of issues in the field of neuropsychology. The structural and cellular organization of the central nervous system will be reviewed followed by a discussion of the theoretical framework for brain behavior relationships. Common neurological disorders including epilepsy, degenerative diseases, traumatic brain injury, and vascular insults will be examined in detail. The test batteries and techniques typically used in neuropsychological assessment will be reviewed. Previous NMHU PSY 608.

PSYC 6120. Psychopharmacology (3); Sp
The course consists of the study of drug action at physiological and behavioral levels. Psychological and medical applications and limitations of drugs used in the treatment of mental illness will be covered. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU PSY 612.

PSYC 6210. Advanced Social Psychology (3); Fa
Comprehensive review of major theories and related research in social psychology. Emphasis given to attributional and social exchange approaches. Previous NMHU PSY 621.

PSYC 6270. Career Development (3); Su
An examination of theories and frameworks for career development including the major techniques and instruments used in career assessment. Attention will be given to the psychological and social factors affecting career choice, planning and development. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in psychology or allied major, permission of instructor. Previous NMHU PSY 627.

PSYC 6340. Practicum (1 – 12 VC); Fa, Sp, Su
A field placement in a local institution or agency providing extensive exposure to the use of professional techniques under staff supervision. This course may be repeated up to a limit of 12 hours of credit. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU PSY 634.

PSYC 6400. Advanced Developmental Psychology (3); Sp
An in-depth coverage of developmental theories and research across the life span. Previous NMHU PSY 640.

PSYC 6510. Professional Ethics and Issues (3); Fa
Examination of ethical theory as it relates to the practice of psychology. Review of the American Psychological Association Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct. Presentation of additional information relevant to the professional psychologists. Course may be repeated once for credit. Previous NMHU PSY 651.

PSYC 6710. Advanced Psychopathology (3); Fa
An examination of adult psychopathology with emphasis on current research, theories, and interventions presented within the context of DSM application. A unique aspect is exposure to the shifting of paradigms from disease-centered psychiatry to the culture-based, client-centered paradigm of mental illness. Prerequisite: Graduate status in psychology or permission of instructor. Cross-listed as SOWK 6710. Previous NMHU PSY 671.

PSYC 6720. Introduction to Counseling and Therapy (3); Sp
To provide the student with a relatively in-depth introduction to basic clinical skills and a few evidence-based psychotherapeutic modalities currently in use by practitioners. Students will learn the theories and applied skills for these evidence-based modalities, and skills will be practiced extensively in class. Students will also learn and practice clinical note writing. Prerequisite: Graduate status in psychology or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU PSY 672. 

PSYC 6740. Individual Intelligence Testing (3); 1, 2 Fa
Theories of intelligence, administration, scoring, and interpretation of widely used individual intelligence tests. Emphasis is given to the WISC-III and WAIS-III. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU PSY 674.

PSYC 6750. Personality Assessment (3); 1, 2 Sp
In this course, students will learn the assessment process and basic psychometrics. This course will give students exposure to and experience with the administration, scoring, and interpretation of a number of commonly used personality/psychopathology assessment instruments. Students will practice integrating data from multiple tests with information from a clinical interview, and writing an integrated assessment report. Prerequisites: PSYC 6710 and PSYC 5710 or PSYC 6740 or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU PSY 675.

PSYC 6770. Multicultural Psychotherapy (3); Sp
Examination and application of the American Psychological Association’s Multicultural Guidelines in therapy and counseling. Emphasis on clinical strategies for building cultural competence in working with racial/ethnic minority populations and other culturally diverse populations. Prerequisite: Graduate status in psychology or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU PSY 677.

PSYC 6790. Behavior Therapy & Assessment (3); 1, 2 Fa
Experimental and theoretical basis of behavior therapy and assessment, and issues related to their application. The course seeks to familiarize the student with current procedures and their origins in experimental psychology, to indicate strengths and limitations of these techniques and to suggest specific problem areas requiring research exploration. Prerequisite: Graduate status in psychology or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU PSY 679.

PSYC 6810. Neuropsychological Assessment (3); 1, 2 Sp
Course provides the student with a systematic clinical diagnostic procedure used to determine the extent of any possible behavioral deficits following diagnosed or suspected brain injury. Such assessments would be helpful for patients having, or suspected of having, various brain disorders that result in problems with memory, intellectual and cognitive functioning, daily activities, or behavior and emotions. Such conditions include head injury, stroke, epilepsy, brain tumor, toxic or other encephalopathies, dementia, developmental and learning disabilities, and other neurological disorders. Neuropsychological assessment would be used to determine the differential contribution of neurologic and psychiatric factors in a patient’s presenting problems, and in the specification of the patient’s psychological and behavioral strengths and weaknesses related to neurological dysfunction. Previous NMHU PSY 681.

PSYC 6910. Colloquium: Teaching of Psychology (1); Fa, Sp
Teaching approaches and issues applicable in specified courses in psychology; designed for graduate teaching assistants in psychology. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU PSY 691.

PSYC 6920. Independent Research (1 – 4 VC); Fa, Sp
Independent research, including data collection, analysis, and interpretation, arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU PSY 692.

PSYC 6960. Publishable Papers/Capstone (1 – 6 VC); Fa, Sp, Su
This is a capstone course that enables the non-thesis M.S. students in the clinical psychology/counseling program to complete their capstone portfolio. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU PSY 696.

PSYC 6990. Thesis (1 – 6 VC); Fa, Sp, Su
Individual research and writing in preparation of a graduate thesis. After enrolling for thesis, student must continue to enroll for at least one credit hour of thesis each semester until completed. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU PSY 699.

Courses in Reading (RDED) 

RDED 5110. Teaching and Diagnosis of Reading (3); 2, 2 Fa, Sp
An overview of teaching reading in the primary and intermediate grades and of diagnostic tools and corrective instructional techniques in the classroom. Emphasis is placed on developing competencies in the teaching of reading and in adopting reading instruction based on a knowledge of reading process, methods, and materials. Two hours of lab are required. Previous RDED 511.

RDED 5150. Early Literacy (3); Fa, Sp
Early literacy instruction, including reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing and visually representing, and other modalities of learning. Special emphasis will be placed on addressing current research regarding teaching early literacy, including phonics, phonemic awareness, fluency, comprehension, and vocabulary. Knowing and using children’s books and authors to promote early literacy. A two-hour-per-week practicum/lab in a K-3 classroom is required. Previous RDED 515. 

RDED 5160. Teaching Reading and the Language Arts in the Bilingual Classroom (3); Sp
Methods and materials in the Spanish-English bilingual classroom, with emphasis upon the development of reading and language arts skills in bilingual children. Previous RDED 516.

RDED 5180. Language Arts (3); Sp, Su
This course focuses on methods for teaching language arts in the elementary/secondary school classroom. Students will be introduced to best practices in the teaching of language arts and the research and theory behind these practices. A developmental and cultural perspective will be emphasized throughout the course, documenting qualitative and quantitative changes students experience as they progress in the language arts. Previous RDED 518.

RDED 5200. Literacy for English Language Learners (3); Fa, Su
This course examines theories of literacy acquisition and development with the breadth of issues in the teaching of English Learners. Previous RDED 520.

RDED 5260. Reading and Literature for Children and Young Adults (3); Fa
This course is an exploration and evaluation of the artistic qualities of folk and fairy tales, myths, legends, fables, epics, hero tales, and realistic stories for young children (preschool to grade 8) and young adults (grades 9 to 12), with emphasis on multicultural literature and on helping teachers to motivate youngsters to develop literacy skills while reading relevant literature. Previous RDED 526.

RDED 5270. Reading in the Content Area (3); Fa, Sp
Survey of techniques for the development of reading/study skills needed at the secondary level as students employ reading as a tool for learning. Previous RDED 527.

RDED 5300. Reading Instruction in Special Education (3); Fa
The study and application of reading instructional strategies for students in special education, focusing on research-based corrective strategies used across content areas to support students in both the general education curriculum and functional curriculum. Previous RDED 530.

RDED 5350 – 6350. Selected Topic in Reading (1 – 4 VC); Var
Course in topic or topics in reading. May be repeated with change of content. Previous RDED 535-635.

RDED 5400. Integrated Technology in Language Arts Curriculum (3); Sp
This course teaches students to integrate technology into the P-12 Language Arts curriculum. Such integration will include the use of various websites, software application programs, synchronous and asynchronous course learning management system tools, SmartBoard technologies, and digital camera and recording equipment. As part of this course, students will be required to prepare computer-generated graphic organizers, databases, presentations, podcasts, wikis, blogs, and electronic portfolios while incorporating the appropriate benchmarks, standards, and performance criteria from the New Mexico Public Education Department. Previous RDED 540.

RDED 5420. Literacy & Technology (3); Su
This course is designed to help students demonstrate understanding and apply knowledge of contemporary and historical issues in literacy, technology, and education and reflect on how those issues influence professional practice. Survey of techniques for the development of reading skills needed at the secondary level as students employ reading as a tool for learning. Previous RDED 542.

RDED 5450. Literatura Infantil y Juvenil Para el Salón Bilingüe (3); Sp
This course focuses on the teaching of reading in the Spanish-English bilingual classroom using authentic literature from throughout the Spanish-speaking world with emphasis upon the development of reading and language arts skills in bilingual children. Since most material is in Spanish, an intermediate level of Spanish or instructor permission is required. Previous RDED 545.

RDED 5900 – 6900. Independent Study (1 – 4 VC); Var
Individual study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous RDED 590-690.

RDED 6160. Psycholinguistics in Reading (3); Sp
The study of reading as a socio-psycholinguistic process. Previous RDED 616.

RDED 6180. Diagnosis and Remedial Reading 1 (3); Fa
Advanced study of informal tests, assessment tools, the diagnostic process, and the implementation of corrective procedures for reading deficiencies through a case study for either an elementary or secondary student in a clinical or classroom setting. Previous RDED 618.

RDED 6210. Diagnosis and Remedial Reading 2 (3); Sp
A continuation of RDED 618. Introduction to formal and standardized tests, with emphasis on administering, interpreting, and evaluating the results obtained therefrom, drawing conclusions, and making relevant recommendations for correcting the reading deficiencies analyzed. Previous RDED 621.

RDED 6230. Evaluating Reading Materials & Designing Reading Programs (3); Fa
Survey of reading resources and development and use of standards in selecting and evaluating appropriate materials for instructional programs in reading. Previous RDED 623.

RDED 6500. Seminar (3); Var
Seminar course in special topics in literacy. Previous RDED 650.

RDED 6920. Independent Research (1 – 4 VC); Var
Independent research arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

Courses in Sociology (SOCI) 

SOCI 5100. Sociology of Sexuality (3); Var
This course will look at historical perceptions, practices and reactions to sexuality.  As the course progresses, it will focus more closely on particular social contexts and notions of power.

SOCI 5120. Social Stratification (3); Sp
Differentiation, status, social mobility, class, and caste in selected societies. Previous NMHU SOC 512.

SOCI 5140. Race, Ethnicity, and Policing (3); Var
A thorough overview of the various ways in which racial stratification in the U.S. impacts current policing methods. A critical approach to racial profiling, excessive force, surveillance technology, community cooperation, and community policing, with an exploration of constructive ways in which best practices can be identified and applied.

SOCI 5150. Development and Socio-Cultural Change (3); Var
This course concerns the nature and consequences of development and culture change. The focus is on contemporary issues and many ways in which anthropology is used outside its purely academic context: how anthropology is applied to contemporary human issues, how it benefits society, and how it advances theoretical knowledge. Cross-listed as: ANTH 5150. Prerequisite: ANTH 1215 Intro to Phy Anth & Archaeology or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU SOC 515.

SOCI 5160. Organized Crime (3); Var
This course is an in-depth examination of organized crime. Emphasis is placed on the theories of organized crime, the social, political, and historical evolution of organized crime, the principal forms of organized criminal activity, and efforts to investigate, control and prosecute organized crime. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110.

SOCI 5180. Reproductive Justice (3); Var
This class examines the reproductive justice theoretical framework, its history, origins, and conceptualization to explore its practical applications for transformative feminist activism and theorizing. Reproductive justice developed as a multi-layered theoretical paradigm and model for theorists/activists concerned about issues surrounding reproductive dignity. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110.

SOCI 5220. Magic, Witchcraft, and Healing (3); Var
The origins, elements, forms, and symbolism of religion including a comparative survey of religious beliefs, myths, practices and symbolism. Course focuses on religion in the context of culture with an emphasis on appreciating religious differences. Cross-listed as: ANTH 5220. Prerequisite: One course in introductory sociology or anthropology. Previous NMHU SOC 522.

SOCI 5240. Violence and Society (3); Fa
In this course, violence will be studied as a social phenomenon. The course includes general descriptions and theories of violence as well as considerations to reduce lethal and non-lethal violence in society. Prerequisites: SOCI 1110 and ANTH 1140.

SOCI 5260. Gender, Food, and Culture (3); Var

This class takes interdisciplinary gendered perspectives to explore the ways that food behaviors and beliefs surrounding the production, distribution, and consumption of food, influence constructions of identity, femininity/masculinity, culture, sexuality, and reinforce and contest gender hierarchies. Prerequisite: SOCI 1110.

SOCI 5270. Criminology (3); Sp
An overview of definitions and types of crime, and social theories of crime causation; special issues related to crime, crime control and crime prevention. Previous NMHU SOC 527.

SOCI 5280. Global Crime (3); Var
This course is a sociological and anthropological analysis of social control and law in a variety of social, cultural, and global contexts. Previous NMHU SOC 528.

SOCI 5290. Gender, Culture, and Society (3); Var
This course provides a foundation for understanding gender as expressed within and influenced by society. Cross culturally men and women are perceived as different, often as opposites. This perception can affect the quality of life, both on a structural level (in terms of wages earned, jobs held) and on an interpersonal level (in terms of expression of self/autonomy). Various theoretical perspectives are explored in order to understand why this perception of difference exists, how it translates into inequality and how it is learned. Previous NMHU SOC 529.

SOCI 5300. Applied Social Research and Data Analysis (4); 3, 2 Sp
Instruction in application of techniques used in the analysis of quantitative and qualitative social science research data. Previous NMHU SOC 530.

SOCI 5310. Political Sociology (3); Var
Sociological theory and research as applied to the study of political behavior, including such topics as the social bases of power (class, occupation, religion, cultural values), decision-making, leadership and communications. Previous NMHU SOC 531.

SOCI 5350 – 6350. Selected Topics in Sociology (1 – 4 VC); Var
Course in topic or topics in sociology: may be repeated with a change of content. Previous NMHU SOC 535-635. 

SOCI 5390. Introduction to Contemporary Sociological Theories (3); Sp
Introduction to and analysis of contemporary sociological theories. Previous NMHU SOC 539.

SOCI 5500 – 6500. Seminar in Sociology (1 – 4 VC); Var
Seminar course in a topic or topics in sociology: may be repeated with change in content. Previous NMHU SOC 550 – 650.

SOCI 5540. Women and Globalization (3); Var
This course examines how women’s lives are shaped by globalization through the feminization of labor and migration, environmental degradation, Diaspora, sexuality, cultural displacement, and militarization. It explores the ways women have confronted these conditions as well as the possibilities and challenges of cross-border feminist coalitions. Previous NMHU SOC 554.

SOCI 5600. Approaches to Dispute Resolution (3); Var
This course provides a theoretical and practical understanding of dispute resolution processes in use in the private and public sectors. The course examines how and why dispute resolution processes function in particular environments, and critiques the strengths and weaknesses of each process. Prerequisite: Introductory course in psychology or introductory course in sociology. Previous NMHU SOC 560.

SOCI 5900–6900. Independent Study (1 – 4 VC); Var
Independent, directed study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU SOC 590-690.

SOCI 5930. Race and Ethnic Relations (3); Sp
The basic processes operating in the present-day interrelations of ethnic groups. Previous NMHU SOC 593.

SOCI 6300. Research Methods in Sociology and Anthropology (3); Var
Research techniques in the study of social and cultural aspects of human existence, critical study, and application of methods. Previous NMHU SOC 630.

SOCI 6380. Advanced Classical Sociological Theories (3); Fa
This course will explore the origins and development of sociological theory through the examination of original source materials. The course is an advanced exploration of classical sociological theory designed specifically for graduate students. The student will gain an understanding of the important theoretical constructs that have shaped sociology and our understanding of society. In addition, the student will emerge with the ability to apply these theoretical constructs to both past and current social phenomena and problems. Previous NMHU SOC 638. 

SOCI 6390. Contemporary Sociological Theories (3); Sp
Detailed study of recent social theories with critical analysis and comparison. Previous NMHU SOC 639.

SOCI 6920. Independent Research (1 – 4 VC); Var
Independent research arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU SOC 692.

SOCI 6980. Field Experience (1 – 6 VC); Var
A field placement in a local institution or agency providing opportunity for observation and limited exposure to the use of professional techniques under staff supervision. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU SOC 698.

SOCI 6990. Thesis (1 – 6 VC); Var
Individual research and writing in preparation of a graduate thesis. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU SOC 699.

Courses in Social Work (SOWK)
Social Work courses are offered only once during the academic year. With the exception of social work graduate electives, all other courses are reserved solely for matriculating MSW students.

SOWK 5000. Children’s Services (2); Var
This elective provides an overview of services for the protection of children. Additionally, it surveys child and family welfare policies and programs, with special emphasis on the New Mexico child welfare system. Previous SW 500.

SOWK 5110. Social Work in the Schools (2); Sp
This course will cover the variety of roles of the school social worker and will also address school social work history, policies and background on regular and special education. Student problems, including basic needs, loss, abuse, neglect, substance abuse, suicide, school violence, and teen pregnancy, will be addressed. This course will also focus on culturally sensitive approaches to the provision of school and school social work services.

SOWK 5120. Immigrant Rights (2); Var
This course will examine major historical trends in migration to the United States; public policy regarding migration and the rights of immigrants; and the roles of governmental and nongovernmental organizations. Issues such as immigration enforcement; labor rights; and access to healthcare and public benefits will also be addressed. Previous SW 512.

SOWK 5140. The Social Determinants of Health and Wellbeing (2); Var
The purpose of this course is to explore the social, societal, governmental, and environmental influences on health and wellbeing. We will investigate macro-level causes of individual and social problems so as to inform treatment and prevention programs and social policy. Specifically, the course will explore not only the health risk and protective factors in the physical and social environment that directly impact health, but also the ways in which they shape health behaviors, and the ways in which they can be addressed by community and governmental intervention. Previous SW 514.

SOWK 5160. Social Work Practice with Military Families (2); Var
This course surveys the theoretical and practical methods or providing support to military families during the three phases or the deployment cycle. Factors supporting resilience in children and adults in military families will be identified, and diversity in military families explored. Previous SW 516.

SOWK 5180. Social Work in Rural Communities (2); Var
This course introduces students to Social Work practice in rural contexts and the culture of people who live in rural communities and their unique social problems.  Social work practice, policy, diversity, and ethics in rural communities will be explored to help prepare students for practice in rural contexts.  The unique and complex roles that social works who practice in rural contexts will be examined and differentiated for coal work practice in urban communities.

SOWK 5200. Macro Practice (3); Var
Individual macro practitioners dynamically interact between political and organizational contexts and his/her own personal and professional development. This course is designed to enable the student to professionally guide their own strategic choices through critical judgements and apply social work skills in the context of practice.

SOWK 5280. Introduction to Substance Use and Abuse (3); Sp
This introductory course examines prevention and treatment approaches to alcohol and substance use/abuse. Approaches relevant to work with individuals, families, groups, and communities are presented. The influences of culture, race, ethnicity, gender, age, sexual orientation, and disability in addictions, as well as the effects of environmental factors, oppression, and social and economic injustice will be explored.

SOWK 5290. Family Violence (2); Var
The course surveys major sociological and psychological theories of family violence throughout the life span. Social and interpersonal factors contributing to family violence are explored in an ethnocultural context, with special emphasis on the Hispanic and Native American populations of New Mexico and the Southwest. Previous SW 529.

SOWK 5300. Evaluative Research (3); Sp
The foundation research course introduces students to concepts of research for application in various human service contexts. The course covers elements of the research process, research design, statistical analysis, and the ethical issues in conducting research. Both qualitative and quantitative methods are presented, and issues relevant to research focusing on culturally diverse populations. Prerequisite: Evidence of having completed a statistics course within the past five years. SOWK 3300 Research Methods meets this prerequisite requirement. Previous SW 530.

SOWK 5310. Aging and Gerontology (2); Sp
Older adults represented 12.9% of the U.S. population in 2009. By 2030 there will be about 72.1 million older persons, more than twice their number in 2000. People 65+ represented 12.4% of the population in the year 2000, but are expected to grow to be 19% of the population by 2030! The need for social workers for this population is tremendous. This course covers the emotional, biological, psychological, environmental, and legal aspects of aging that occur in the elderly, with special emphasis on the Hispanic and Native American populations of New Mexico and the Southwest.

SOWK 5320. Field Practicum 1 (3); Var Fa, Sp, Su
This foundation practicum sequence is designed to help students apply foundation knowledge of social work skills, values and ethics to practice. By providing a series of supervised assignments and tasks, the practicum experience will expose students to a variety of social work roles. Students will apply generalist social work knowledge, skills and values to practice with individuals, couples, families, groups and communities. Corequisites: SOWK 5510. Previous SW 532.

SOWK 5330. Law and Ethics in Social Work Practice (3); Fa, Sp
This course examines areas of the law in which social work and the legal system intertwine. Major emphasis is placed on the operation of the legal system in New Mexico and the Southwest. The course introduces students to critical principles, guidelines, reasoning strategies and legal concepts necessary to make informed, effective practice decisions. Previous SW 533. 

SOWK 5340. Field Practicum 2 (3); Var Fa, Sp, Su
This foundation practicum sequence is designed to help students apply foundation knowledge of social work skills, values and ethics to practice. By providing a series of supervised assignments and tasks, the practicum experience will expose students to a variety of social work roles. Students will apply generalist social work knowledge, skills and values to practice with individuals, couples, families, groups and communities. Prerequisites:  SOWK 5320, SOWK 5330, SOWK 5410, SOWK 5650, and SOWK 5850. Previous SW 534.

SOWK 5350–6350. Selected Topic in Social Work (1-3); Var
One or more elective courses may be offered relating to advanced topics in social work practice. Previous SW 535-635.

SOWK 5370 Grief Assessment & Intervention (2); Var
This course examines current grief and loss theory from a strengths-based, developmental and multicultural perspective. The focus of the course is grief interviewing and case-based grief assessment and treatment across the life span. Individual, family, and group approaches to grief treatment are examined. Culture is examined throughout the course with added emphasis on grief assessment and interventions with the diverse populations of New Mexico and the Southwest, including Hispanic and Native American peoples.

SOWK 5400–6400. Social Work in Health Care Settings (2); Var
The course provides an overview of social work within the health care delivery system. Topics covered include the psychosocial dimensions of chronic illness, the treatment role of the social worker, and the funding of contemporary health care. Special emphasis is placed on health care delivery in the rural and urban settings of New Mexico and the Southwest, particularly with Hispanic and Native American populations. Previous SW 540-640.

SOWK 5410. Soc Policy: Hist, Struct & Ana (3); Fa
This foundational policy course outlines the history of social welfare policy and the manner in which social services have been provided before and after the European conquest of New Mexico and the Southwest. It surveys contemporary social problems, and evaluates social legislation, policies, programs and political and social manifestations of racism, sexism and oppression. It also analyzes the impact of these on the diverse, historically vulnerable populations of the Southwest. It introduces students to advanced policy analysis and advocacy strategies that promote social justice. Previous SW 541.

SOWK 5460. Understanding Difference: A Context for Social Work Practice (3); Sp, Su
This course examines the socio-cultural-political-historical context in which social work is practiced, with an emphasis on New Mexico and the Southwest. The course provides a framework for understanding issues of diversity, oppression and social justice within the context of race/ethnicity, class, gender, sexual orientation and disability. An interdisciplinary approach allows students to become familiar with the legacies of conquest and colonization in New Mexico and the Southwest, as well as understand how the dynamics of power and changing demographics impact and are impacted by people residing in the region. Previous SW 546.

SOWK 5470–6470. Resource Acquisition and Grant Writing in Human Services (2); Var
The course teaches systematic resource acquisition skills for human services. Special emphasis is placed upon resource acquisition within New Mexico and the Southwest, especially on behalf of Hispanic and Native American populations. Previous SW 547-647.

SOWK 5510. Field Seminar (1); Var
This seminar is required during the first semester. It provides students with an opportunity to integrate practice theory with field practicum experience. Instructors will assist students with their understanding and application of social work knowledge to specific programs, issues, and concerns that arise in the provision of social work services. Corequisites: SOWK 5320 and SOWK 5650. Previous SW 551.

SOWK 5650. Social Work Practice 1 (3); Fa
This course presents the foundation skills necessary for the provision of generalist social work services to individuals. The course develops the direct practice knowledge and skills necessary for ethical and competent engagement, problem identification, assessment, intervention design, implementation, and termination with diverse, vulnerable, and at-risk clients. Emphasis is placed on generalist social work practice with Hispanic, American Indian and other oppressed groups of New Mexico and the Southwest. Corequisites: SOWK 5320 and SOWK 5510. Previous SW 565.

SOWK 5660. Social Work Practice 2 (3); Sp
This course focuses on a critical and comparative analysis of frameworks, theories and models of social work practice. The course examines the four forces in psychology as the building blocks of an integrative, multicultural, ecosystems approach to social work practice. Implications of each practice approach for work at the micro, mezzo, and macro level are examined. Emphasis is placed on the evaluation of the practice approaches for work with diverse populations, with emphasis on the Native American, Hispanic and other oppressed populations of New Mexico and the Southwest. Prerequisite: SOWK 5650. Corequisite: SOWK 5340. Previous SW 566.

SOWK 5690. Social Work Practice Skills (2); Var
This course is intended to provide student with the opportunity to refine skills that were introduced in required practice theory courses and to become familiar and proficient with skills in work with client systems and on skills that are required in the day to day functioning of social service organizations. The course will provide opportunities for students to practice the above skills individually and in conjunction with other students and student groups during class sessions. Most class sessions will include a didactic presentation of a skill or skills followed by time dedicated to experiential exercises and activities. Previous SW 568.

SOWK 5850. Human Behavior and the Social Environment 1 (3); Fa
This two-semester course sequence critically examines traditional and alternative theoretical perspectives of human life course development and the environmental contexts within which development occurs. The sequence explores the interactions among individuals and between individuals and families, groups, organizations, and communities. Particular emphasis is placed on the influence of culture, race and ethnicity on human development and on the effects that oppression and social and economic injustice have on human behavior, with special consideration given to the diverse populations of New Mexico and the Southwest. Previous SW 585.

SOWK 5860. Human Behavior and the Social Environment 2 (3); Sp
This two-semester course sequence critically examines traditional and alternative theoretical perspectives of human life course development and the environmental contexts within which development occurs. The sequence explores the interactions among individuals and between individuals and families, groups, organizations, and communities. Particular emphasis is placed on the influence of culture, race and ethnicity on human development and on the effects that oppression and social and economic injustice have on human behavior, with special consideration given to the diverse populations of New Mexico and the Southwest. This is the second course of a two-semester sequence described above. Prerequisite: SW 5850.

SOWK 5900–6900. Independent Study (1 – 4 VC); Var
Independent study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous SW 590-690.

SOWK 6010 DSM for Clinicians (3); Fa, Sp
This course will provide an overview of the DSM-IV TR classification. The cultural, gender, systemic, social and biological contexts for the expression, classification and assessment of conditions will be explores, including the biases and limits of the DSM categorical approach to understanding human nature. The class will utilize lectures, discussions and in-class exercises to emphasize how best to honor the particular strengths of individuals and cultures as they relate to the processes and procedures of diagnostic categorization. Previous SW 601.

SOWK 6020 DSM (Bilingual) (3); Fa
This is a required course for the bilingual program. It provides an overview of the DSM classification of mental disorders. In this course the focus is on the use of this classification system with Spanish-speaking populations and Spanish-speaking immigrants. It will work off the cultural formulation mode (CF) as outlined in the DSM IV appendix one, and expanded upon by other authors. The model is a systematic method of assessing cultural contribution to an illness presentation. It supplements the biopsychosocial approach by highlighting the effect of culture (in this case Latino culture) on the client’s symptomology, explanatory models of illness, help seeking preferences and outcome expectations. Along with the CF model each disorder will be covered focusing the literature that describes some of the cultural issues of each disorder. Previous SW 602.

SOWK 6040. Mindfulness and Social Work (2); Var
Mindfulness, often defined as intentional awareness of present experience with acceptance, is increasingly employed as an intervention for stress reduction, depression, substance abuse relapse prevention, and anxiety. It is used in work with groups, families, and communities. Mindfulness is also seen as a core process in the therapeutic relationship as well in the self-development and self-care of social workers. This course will focus on the principles and practices of mindfulness relevant to the social worker, the helping relationship, and therapeutic applications with clients. Students will develop knowledge and skills that can be applied to clients experiencing a number of clinical issues, as well as laying the foundation for their own mindfulness practices. Previous SW 604.

SOWK 6050. Public Budgeting (3); Var
This course focuses on public budgeting principles and processes and policy making process in federal, state and local government. Topics include the history of budgeting, budget reform, ethical considerations, budget development, analysis, and revenue, expenditure forecasting, and state and local financial management. Previous SW 605.

SOWK 6060. Brief Time-Effective Psychotherapies (2); Var
This course will provide a foundation for brief, time-effective clinical social work practice with individuals, couples, families, and groups. Emphasis will be placed on results-oriented, strength-based pragmatic clinical techniques and interventions that integrate various approaches including dynamic, behavioral, cognitive, strategic and solution-focused as examples. Previous SW 606.

SOWK 6080. Diagnosis and Treatment of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (2); Var
This course surveys diagnosis of and social work practice interventions for the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder related to war, rape, terrorism, natural disaster, crime, violence, cult survivors and historic oppression of vulnerable populations. Psychotherapeutic, behavioral, chemo-therapeutic, inpatient and self-help approaches to individuals, families and groups will be presented, with special emphasis on interventions appropriate to the Hispanic and Native American population of New Mexico and the Southwest. Previous SW 608.

SOWK 6090. Political Economy (3); Sp
This course reviews the government’s effect on the economy, specifically reviewing the impact of the political process on government behavior; how government influences the behavior of private and public economics and the extent of government intervention in the allocation and distribution of economic resources. Previous SW 609.

SOWK 6100. Crisis Intervention (2); Var
This course will provide models for understanding the process of crisis formations as well as models for enhancing functioning by changing the perception of the precipitating event and facilitating the acquisition of new coping skills. Practical strategies and guidelines will be presented for a basic model of crisis intervention with an emphasis on developing and maintaining rapport, identifying the meanings, perceptions and subjective distress related to the precipitating event and exploring, encouraging and presenting alternative coping behaviors. Previous SW 610.

SOWK 6130. Psychopharmacology for Social Workers (2); Var
This course will provide an overview of psychologically active (psychotropic) drugs commonly used in clinical practice and diagnostic conditions for which they are targeted. The focus will be on information relevant to mental health professionals whose clients are taking or may be prescribed psychotropic medication. The class will utilize lectures and discussions to emphasize multimodal mental health treatment that integrates psychological, systemic, social, biological and medical models of mental health. Previous SW 613.

SOWK 6180. Jungian Approach to Play Therapy (2); Var
This class will present play therapy from a Jungian perspective. Play is the language of children, through which they can express their feelings, describe conflicts and develop strategies for meeting developmental challenges. Lectures will be given on active imagination, ceremony, Jungian theory and concepts, developmental obstacles such as shame and loss, art therapy, sand tray therapy, and work with victims of abuse/neglect. Students will be asked to engage in a series of self-knowledge activities, since one of the basic beliefs of Jungian psychology is that the practitioner’s self-knowledge is key to working with others. Prerequisite: Completion of 500-level courses. Previous SW 618.

SOWK 6200. Substance Use and Abuse (3); Fa
This course focuses on substance sue disorders from a holistic, bio/psycho/social theoretical perspective. All aspects of substance use and abuse will be explored within the multicultural spectrum, with a special focus on how substance abuse impacts the brain. Previous SW 620.

SOWK 6210. Family Therapy with Children and Adolescents (2); Var
This course will provide a foundation for clinical social work practice with children, adolescents and their families. Emphasis will be placed on practical clinical techniques and interventions incorporating recent advances in the field. Elements of clinical practice will be firmly grounded in applied theory and research. The context of larger system issues regarding organizations, culture, and society within which therapeutic practice exists will be a foundational theme of this course.

SOWK 6220. Indigenous North American Perspectives and Social Work Practice (2); Var
This course includes both review and analysis of policy and social contextual factors related to social work practice form an Indigenous North American perspective.  Concepts such as colonization, decolonization, identity development, and Indigenous-centered approaches to practice are presented.  This course provides an examination of historic and contemporary influences on social, economic, cultural, and political conditions that shape the lived experience of Indigenous populations in North America.  This course also emphasizes the linkages between policy and practice and overlays the concepts of the colonization, marginalization, and the negative impact of both historicizing and pathologizing Indigenous North American peoples.  The processes of colonization, decolonization, and empowerment are discussed as they relate to: 1) differences between Indigenous North American and majority culture worldviews which also includes social perspectives; and 2) the role of the social work profession as an agent for advocacy and an ally in the development and delivery of culturally congruent services to Indigenous client populations.

SOWK 6230. Couples Therapy (2); Var
This course is designed to investigate clinically proven, evidence-based approaches to couples therapy, enabling the student to use the most effective treatment models in their practice. Each stage of the relationship lifecycle is explored, allowing the student to apply treatment approaches for each stage. The course maintains a focus on the diversity within adult couples within changing multicultural contexts. Previous SW 623.

SOWK 6240. Adolescent Health and Development (2); Sp
This course will coverer the physical, neurological, cognitive, and psychosocial aspects of adolescent development. Important contextual, conceptual, and policy areas relating to adolescence will be presented including, but not limited to: resiliency, self-empowerment, family, school, confidentiality/privacy, media influences, and more. The second half of the semester will focus on social context of adolescent mental health issues, as well as the interventions, theories, and skills to address those issues. It will cover assessment, practice theories, and evidence-based interventions.

SOWK 6250. Non-Profit Management (3); Sp
Nonprofits continue to be a source of significant community structure, support and identity. They are shaping public policy, delivering services, mobilizing for collective impact, contributing to our economies, and in general facilitating community participation and influence that creates effective societies. This course will explore the nonprofit industry as it exists today and discuss the role of leadership as it pertains to maintaining the legal, ethical and financial integrity of the non-profit organization. The basics of running non-profit agencies and organizations will be addressed. Previous SW 625.

SOWK 6260. Neuroscience for Clinical Social Work (2); Sp
This course provides an overview of neuroscience concepts central to clinical social work, including neuroscience findings in the areas of child development, attachment theory, trauma theory, and clinical theory. Neurobiological aspects of the assessment and treatment of personality disorders, the neurobiology of the adolescent brain, and the relevance of neuroscience for group work and the supervisory process will be addressed. Aspects of the cultural neuroscience will be examined.

SOWK 6300. Advanced Agency Research (3); Fa
This course teaches advanced research skills necessary for program evaluation. Topics covered include qualitative and quantitative research methods, research design, analysis of research reports, the use of statistical packages for data analysis for practice and program evaluation. Previous SW 630.

SOWK 6310. Advanced Qualitative Research (3); Fa
In this course students will learn about selected qualitative research methods with a focus on acquiring skills in the method of life story interviewing. Students will also develop skills in analyzing interdisciplinary texts that employ qualitative research methods. These texts and readings will introduce students to the socio-historical-political context of New Mexico and the Southwest, as well as the diversity of its Latino/Mexicano populations. These broader perspectives, along with the lived experience of native Hispanic New Mexicans and Mexican nationals and other Latinos reflected in personal narratives, forms the context for social work as it is practiced in New Mexico and U.S.-Mexico border region. Previous SW 631.

SOWK 6320. Field Practicum 3 (3); Var
The advanced field practicum sequence is designed to help students continue to develop a professional identity as a social work practitioner as well as to improve practice skills through experiential learning and supervision. This course will build on advanced practice skills learned in the foundation practice courses.  Prerequisites:  SOWK 5300, SOWK 5340, SOWK 5460, SOWK 5660, and SOWK 5860.  Previous SW 632.

SOWK 6340. Field Practicum 4 (3); Var
The advanced field practicum sequence is designed to help students continue to develop a professional identity as a social work practitioner as well as improve upon practice skills through experiential learning and supervision. This course will build on advanced practice skills learned in the foundation practice courses.  Prerequisites:  SOWK 6320. Previous SW 634.

SOWK 6400. Social Work in Healthcare Settings (3); Var
The course provides an overview of social work within the health care delivery system. Topics covered include the psychosocial dimensions of chronic illness, the treatment role of the social worker, and the funding of contemporary health care. Special emphasis is placed on health care delivery in the rural and urban settings of New Mexico and the Southwest, particularly with Hispanic and Native American populations.

SOWK 6420. Advanced Social Policy (3); Sp
This course examines the social policy planning, advocacy, and implementation process, as well as the professional social worker’s policy role. The use of frameworks for policy analysis at the agency, community, political, and legislative levels is discussed. Strategies and techniques for skillful social change interventions in the policy arena are taught. The influences of such factors as oppression, racism, ageism, and homophobia on policy planning at the administrative and agency levels (and in both urban and rural areas) is also examined. Emphasis is placed on the impact of social policy and planning on Hispanics, Native Americans, and other diverse populations of New Mexico and the Southwest. Previous SW 642.

SOWK 6440. Group Work (3); Sp, Su
This course examines a range of groups found in historical and contemporary social work practice, and explores group stages and dynamics in the context of various theoretical approaches. Within a social justice framework, special emphasis is placed on ethical and practical issues of group work with historically oppressed populations. Prerequisites: SOWK 5340 and 5860. Previous SW 644.

SOWK 6450. Grief and Loss (2); Var
The course surveys relevant theory pertaining to the grieving process. Multiple types of loss, including death, divorce, health problems and career transitions, are discussed in an ethno-cultural context. The course also educates students in the design and implementation of grief interventions with individuals and families. Specific emphasis is placed on the design of grief interventions with the diverse populations of New Mexico and the South west, including Hispanic and Native American peoples. Previous SW 645.

SOWK 6470. Resource Acquisition and Grant Writing (2); Var
The course teaches systematic resource acquisition skills for human services. Special emphasis is placed upon resource acquisition within New Mexico and the Southwest, especially on behalf of Hispanic and Native American populations. Previous SW 647.

SOWK 6480. Addictions & Substance Abuse (2); Var
This course examines both abstinence-oriented and harm reduction interventions related to the prevention and treatment of addictive disorders, substance abuse and other compulsive behaviors. Approaches relevant to work with individuals, families, groups, and communities are presented, with special emphasis on the Hispanic and Native American populations of New Mexico and the Southwest. The influences of culture, race, ethnicity, gender, age, sexual orientation and disability in relation to addiction, as well as the effects of oppression and social economic injustice will be explored. Previous SW 648.

SOWK 6510. Leadership & Supervision (3); Fa
This course examines relevant theory pertaining to the purpose, function and role of the social worker as administrator and manager. Management theory, leadership styles, and working within a diverse workforce are presented with special emphasis on working within administrative environments in New Mexico and the Southwest. Previous SW 651.

SOWK 6520. Clinical Supervision (3); Sp
This course is intended to focus specifically on the role and function of the social work supervisor in human service agencies. Social workers in supervisory position are increasingly accountable for the clinical practices of their subordinates. Ultimately, the supervisor is responsible for the quality of services delivered to clients/consumers in the community. This course will examine the historical background, theoretical concepts, and practical applications of supervisory methods in clinical supervision. The course will prepare students with the knowledge and skill to be competent supervisors of other social work practitioners as well as other human services staff. Prerequisites: SOWK 5340 and 5860. Previous SW 652.

SOWK 6540. The Latino Family (La Familia Latina) (2); Sp
This family therapy course focuses on advanced clinical preparation in knowledge and skills (including management, assessment, intervention and evaluation) necessary for social work practice with families that are monolingual in Spanish or bilingual/bicultural (Spanish/English) with a focus on families native to New Mexico and the Southwest as well as immigrant families. Emphasis is placed on the adaptive capabilities of Latino families and on the issues of racism, discrimination, cultural adaptation, migration and sociopolitical issues. Previous SW 654.

SOWK 6590. Co-Occurring substance Abuse and Mental Disorders (3); Sp
This course provides students with a social work understanding of co-occurring substance abuse and mental health disorders. It focuses on assessment, treatment planning, and interventions at the individual, group, family, and community levels. Prerequisites: All SOWK 5000 level foundation coursework and SOWK 6010. Previous SW 659.

SOWK 6640. Organizational Theory (3); Fa
This course provides an analysis of formal organizations and informal relationships among individuals and small groups. This course stresses the study of business organizations as a system of authority and status, control and communication, decision-making centers and leadership positions. Current research and case studies are used for analysis. Corequisites: SOWK 6320 and SOWK 6340.

SOWK 6650. Advanced Multicultural Practice 1 (3); Fa
This is the first of two practice courses offered during the concentration year. This class offers students preparation in skills necessary for clinical social work practice with individuals, including interviewing, assessment, diagnosis, and treatment planning. The western, scientific approach to diagnosis and treatment using the DSM IV is examined as well as alternative approaches used by diverse clients. Emphasis is placed on practice with Hispanic, American Indian and other oppressed populations of New Mexico and the Southwest. Corequisite: SOWK 6320. Previous SW 665.

SOWK 6660. Advanced Multicultural Practice 2 (3); Sp
This course prepares students with the knowledge and skills necessary for clinical practice with children, adolescents and families. Interviewing, assessment, diagnosis treatment planning with families and children are addressed. A social justice perspective on advanced practice with Hispanics, Native Americans and other oppressed populations is emphasized. Prerequisite: SOWK 6650. Corequisite: SOWK 6340. Previous SW 666.

SOWK 6670. Advanced Bilingual Practice 1 (3); Fa
This is a two-semester practice course in which students are introduced to Spanish speaking cultures of New Mexico and to the diversity within this culture. This course strengthens the Spanish language skills of Spanish-speaking students. In addition, it trains them in a culturally competent approach to symptomatology in treatment and equips them with interviewing, assessment, and diagnosis skills from a bilingual, bicultural perspective using DSM. Corequisite: SOWK 6310 and SOWK 6320. Previous NMHU SW 667.

SOWK 6680. Advanced Bilingual Practice 2 (3); Sp
This is the second in a sequence of courses in advanced practice, with a particular focus on Spanish speaking clients. The course focuses on the development of clinical competency in social work with Hispanic families, children, and adolescents. The emphasis is on work with vulnerable populations in crisis, trauma intervention, and special issues in practice with children and adolescents in a variety of clinical settings. The course integrates bilingual/bicultural, multicultural, diversity, social justice, and social change content, particularly as it relates to Spanish-speaking communities of New Mexico and the Southwest. Corequisite: SOWK 6620 and SOWK 6340. Previous SW 668.

SOWK 6890. Social Work Practice and Services in School Settings (2); Var
The course examines the social worker’s roles, responsibilities, and services in school settings, particularly with the school systems of New Mexico and the Southwest. Previous SW 689.

SOWK 6910. Child Welfare Practice and Services (2); Var
The course provides an overview of practice and policy issues, problems, and opportunities in the provision of child welfare services in New Mexico and the Southwest. Previous SW 691.

SOWK 6920. Independent Research (1 – 4 VC); Var
Individual directed research arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous SW 692.

Courses in Software-driven Systems Design (BSSD) 

BSSD 5150. Game Development (3); Sp
This course teaches the basic concepts of game development for casual games. Topics include: character movement, physics, collision detection, attacking, and scoring. Previous NMHU SSD 515.

BSSD 5200. Mobile Applications (3); Sp
This course will cover building a native application from start to finish for Apple’s mobile devices using Objective-C in the Xcode environment. Topics covered include data presentation and handling, and basic user interaction. Previous NMHU SSD 520.

BSSD 5250. Advanced Mobile Applications (3); Fa
In this course, students will work on a large-scale native application for an Apple iOS device. Advanced features such as accelerometer support and geolocation will be taught. Students will complete the project in phases mirroring professional production. Previous NMHU SSD 525.

BSSD 5300. Advanced Web Applications (3); Alt, Fa, Odd
Students will work on a large-scale web application combining various technologies from previous web courses. Advanced features include responsive design for use across all major platforms. Prerequisite: SSD 5310. Previous NMHU SSD 530.

BSSD 5310. Web Applications (3); Sp
This course will combine web technologies such as HTML5, CSS3, PHP, Javascript, and ore to create web-based applications for modern platforms. Previous NMHU SSD 531.

BSSD 5340. Practicum (4); Fa
Production level work with specific responsibilities to student’s previous coursework. Prerequisite: Permission if Instructor. Previous NMHU SSD 534.

BSSD 5350-6350. SD: Selected Topics in Software-driven Systems Design (1-4 VC); Var
Selected topics in software-driven systems design. May be repeated with change of topic. Previous NMHU SSD 535-635.

BSSD 5410. Applied Algorithms and Architecture (3); Fa
The purpose of this course is to understand and use discrete structures that are integral to software engineering. In particular, this class is meant to introduce logic, endianness, proofs, sets, relations, functions, counting and probability, algorithm analysis with emphasis to programming. Previous NMHU SSD 541.

BSSD 5450. Ambient Computing (3); Sp
This course is an exploration of the world of the “invisible” computer. The student will use embedded computers and sensors to learn & then create a robust device that interacts with a specific environment. The course will examine a variety of schemes and approaches to developing computer programs for processors that have no keyboard or screen. We will examine the state of ambient computing technologies & adaptive algorithms. This course compliments the Physical Computing curriculum, but looks at processors that are move complex than the Arduino system. Prerequisite: SSD 5410. Previous NMHU SSD 545.

BSSD 5520. Javascript (3); Fa
The purpose of this course is to teach Javascript basics and popular industry standard frameworks. Previous NMHU SSD 552.

BSSD 5650. Patterns and Pattern Languages (3); Sp
Exploration of design patterns across several programming languages. Prerequisite: SSD 6000. Previous NMHU SSD 565. 

BSSD 5700. Interfaces (3); Alt, Sp, Even
Exploration of alternative human computer interfaces. Prerequisite: SSD 6000. Previous NMHU SSD 570.

BSSD 6000. Principles of Software Design (3); Fa
Fundamental concepts in software design. Previous NMHU SSD 6000.

BSSD 6340. Practicum II (3); Sp
Production level work with specific responsibilities related to student’s previous coursework. Additional supervisory duties based on the student’s previous coursework. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU SSD 634.

BSSD 6900. Independent Study (1-4 VC); Var
Independent study in systems-driven software design. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU SSD 690.

BSSD 6970. Field Project (1 – 6 VC); Var
Individual research and writing in preparation of a graduate thesis. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU SSD 697.

BSSD 6990. Thesis (1 – 6 VC); Fa, Sp
Individual research and writing in preparation of a graduate thesis. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU SSD 699.

Courses in Spanish (SPAN) 

SPAN 5010. Spanish Literature: Aspects of the Short Story (3); Var
This course traces the development of the short story from the Middle Ages, Renaissance, and Golden Age to the present. Previous NMHU SPAN 501.

SPAN 5020. Spanish Literature: Aspects of the Novel (3); Var
This course traces the development of the novel from its origins in prose fiction of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance to the present. Previous NMHU SPAN 502.

SPAN 5030. Latin American Literature: Aspects of the Short Story (3); Var
This course traces the development of the Latin American short story from the ninetieth to the twentieth century. The different literary movements will be traced via this genre: romanticism, realism, naturalism, and modernism. Particular focus will be placed on the more current twentieth century short story. Previous NMHU SPAN 503.

SPAN 5040. Latin American Literature: Aspects of the Novel (3); Var
This course focuses on the Spanish American novel from the Colonial period to the twentieth century. It emphasizes different periods within this genre, i.e., the colonial period, the regionalist novel, and the Latin American boom. Previous NMHU SPAN 504. 

SPAN 5050. Film in the Hispanic World (3); Fa, 3-yr cycle
This course introduces the field of visual arts and cinematic technique. The work of major Hispanic film directors will be presented and compared. Previous NMHU SPAN 505.

SPAN 5060. Hispanic Women Authors (3); Sp, 3-yr cycle
This course is designed to introduce the student to the women authors in Spanish America, covering most genres through the works of Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, Alfonsina Storni, Domitilia Chungara, Rosario Castellanos, Barbara Delano, and others. Previous NMHU SPAN 506.

SPAN 5200. Chicano Short Story of the Southwest (3); Var
This course is a study of major short story writers since the Chicano movement kicked into high gear in the mid-1960s. Master short story writers ranging from Sabine Ulibarri, Tomas Rivera, Rolando Hinojosa Smith, Miguel Mendez, and Rosaura Sanchez, to more modern prose writers such as Denise Chavez and Alicia Gaspar de Alba, among others, will be included. Previous NMHU SPAN 520.

SPAN 5250. Spanish for the Profession (3); Sp
This course studies the vocabulary, expressions, and cultural background to successfully interact in business and professional situations in the Hispanic world. Prerequisite: SPAN 2010 or permission of instructor. Previous NMHU SPAN 525.

SPAN 5260. Spanish for the Profession – Spanish for Law Enforcement (3); Var
This is an advanced course in Spanish for Law Enforcement personnel. The course focuses on situations commonly encountered by professionals in the law enforcement field. Previous NMHU SPAN 526.

SPAN 5300. Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (3); Sp, 3-yr cycle
This course introduces the study of Spanish Linguistics, including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, historical linguistics, and socio-linguistics; combines discussion of theoretical issues with linguistic analysis of Spanish. Previous NMHU SPAN 530.

SPAN 5310. Civilization and Culture of Spain (3); Sp, 3-yr cycle
This course provides students with a synthetic and highly accessible overview of Spanish history, literature, and culture. Previous NMHU SPAN 531.

SPAN 5320. Civilization and Culture of Latin America (3); Sp, 3-yr cycle
This course presents the Spanish American experience of yesterday and today through the social, historical, political and literary aspects that this experience encompasses. Previous NMHU SPAN 532.

SPAN 5330. Civilization and Culture of New Mexico and the Southwest (3); Alt, Fa, Even
Spanish cultural developments and events that have brought about ethnic, economic, political, social, literary, linguistic and historical changes, and typical features in New Mexico and in the southwestern United States are covered in this course. Previous NMHU SPAN 533.

SPAN 5340. Practicum in Spanish (3); Var
Course is an experiential study directed by an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU SPAN 534.

SPAN 5350–6350. Selected Topics in Spanish (1–4 VC); Var
Course in a topic or topics in Spanish. May be repeated with a change in content. Previous NMHU SPAN 535 – 635.

SPAN 5360. Studies in Hispanic Literature (3); 3, 0 Var
This course attempts to introduce the student to the literary production in Spanish. Works written in the Americas and Spain will be studied. A myriad of authors, genres, and themes will be studied. The content of the course will vary each semester. Previous NMHU SPAN 536.

SPAN 5410. Spanish for the Bilingual Classroom (3); Alt, Sp, Even
This course targets students of Bilingual Education and presents the Spanish language as it is applied in school community settings. Use of both vernacular and formal language will be included. Spanish is the language of instruction, inclusive of student presentations/ participation. Previous NMHU SPAN 541. 

SPAN 5450. Teaching of Spanish: Theory and Methodology (3); Sp, 3-yr cycle
This course familiarizes prospective teachers with the philosophy, methodology, and practical techniques of teaching Spanish. Previous NMHU SPAN 545.

SPAN 5460. New Mexico during the 19th and 20th Centuries: An Intellectual Panorama (3); 3, 0 Var
This course endeavors to study writings created in New Mexico from different sources: personal journals, historical accounts, newspaper cultural articles, and literary renditions in all genres. Special attention will be devoted to the poetry of the Penitentes and the Oral Tradition of New Mexico’s Religious Theater during the 19th century. This course will be taught in Spanish. Previous NMHU SPAN 546.

SPAN 5500. Seminar in Spanish (3); Sp, 3-yr cycle
Topic to be selected by instructor. Previous NMHU SPAN 550.

SPAN 5520. Nobel Prize Laureates in Hispanic Literature (3); Var
The principal purpose of the course is to study the Nobel Prize Laureates from Spain and/or Spanish America to ascertain their literary greatness within the genre each one represents in Europe and the Western Hemisphere. May be repeated for credit. Previous NMHU SPAN 552.

SPAN 5580. Colonial Literature of the Americas (3); 3, 1 Var
This course examines in depth literature written in Spain and in Spanish speaking America prior to and during Latin America’s colonial period which would, by geographical extension, include the American Southwest. Texts will include historically prior European works which influenced the conquistador’s ideology, and poetry, letters, diaries, and historical chronicles of Latin America and the southwest from 1492 until the beginning of the 19th century. Prerequisite: Span 4330/5330.

SPAN 5600. Hispanic Literature of the Southwest (3); Fa, 3-yr cycle
A study of Hispanic Southwestern literature written in English and in Spanish. The origins and evolution of this literature are discussed, from the early Spanish exploration to the most recent manifestations in every major literary genre. Previous NMHU SPAN 560.

SPAN 5620. Southwest Folklore (3); Var
A study of the different genres of New Mexican and southwestern folklore, along with the analysis of their popular, cultural, and literary values. Previous NMHU SPAN 562.

SPAN 5640. Hispanic Women of New Mexico (3); Var
This course traces the role and contributions of the Hispana from colonial times to the present. The common-ordinary woman as well as the well-to-do will be studied from a social, cultural, political, and educational perspective. Previous NMHU SPAN 564.

SPAN 5670. History of the Spanish Language (3); 3, 0 Sp, 3-yr cycle
This course traces the development of the Spanish language from Latin to the present. It analyzes the cultural, literary and historical factors that have contributed to its evolution. The transformations that the language undergoes in a different linguistic setting are studied in a section on sociolinguistics issues of United States southwestern Spanish. This course will be taught in Spanish. Previous NMHU SPAN 567.

SPAN 5700. Chicano Literature of the Southwest (3); Alt, Sp, Odd
This is a survey course which studies major literary genres in Chicano literature spurred by the Chicano movement, such as essay, poetry, short story, novel and drama, and folk literature. Previous NMHU SPAN 570.

SPAN 5750. Latina Writers in Translation (3); 3, 0 Var
This course examines the literary production of Hispanic women in the U.S. Gender, race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic issues are analyzed. Through their writings, these women are active in developing new categories of knowledge and creative expression, which demonstrate how Hispanic women position themselves and are positioned within the context of history, culture, and society. Previous NMHU SPAN 575.

SPAN 5900–6900. Independent Study (1–4 VC); Var
Individual directed study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU SPAN 590 – 690.

SPAN 6000. Research Methods in Spanish/Modern Languages (3); Var
The purpose of this course is to teach graduate students the art of research methods and methodology for the study of Spanish/Modern Languages and Literature. Topics that will be addressed are: the meaning of scholarship, plagiarism, parts of a research paper, and composition. There will be an oral presentation of the abstract of the final research paper. Other topics to be discussed are literary theory and archival research. Previous NMHU SPAN 600.

SPAN 6500. Seminar: The Spanish Southwest (1–4 VC); Var
Seminar course in a topic or topics in the language or literature of the Spanish Southwest. Previous NMHU SPAN 650.

SPAN 6520. Seminar: Contemporary Chicano Writers of the Southwest (3); Var
Literary achievements of Chicano writers of the Southwest, beginning with the Chicano movement of the 1960s. This course will be taught in Spanish and/or English, according to the needs of the students. Previous NMHU SPAN 652.

SPAN 6920. Independent Research (1–4 VC); Var
Independent research arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous NMHU SPAN 692.

SPAN 6990. Thesis (1–6 VC); Var
Individual research and writing in preparation of a graduate thesis. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Will be accomplished by the study of specific vocabulary and terminology pertaining to those professions. Previous NMHU SPAN 699.

Courses in Special Education (SPED)

SPED 5010. Diagnosis of the Exceptional Child (3); Fa, Sp
This course is practice in the use of a variety of data-collection instruments and techniques, as well as procedures for writing up the data collected, making referrals, and developing an instructional program. Previous SPED 501.

SPED 5100. Curriculum & Methods for Student with Mild and Moderate Exceptionalities (3); Fa
This course is an examination of curriculum content, instructional methods, and individualized education programs appropriate for students with mild and moderate cognitive or behavioral exceptionalities whose education focuses primarily on the general education curriculum. Previous SPED 510.

SPED 5120. Foundations of Gifted Education (3); Fa, Sp
This course has been designed as a one semester introduction to and overview of the field of gifted education. Topics include: theoretical and historical contexts; characteristics of gifted learners; influences on gifted learners (family, community, culture, etc.); identification of gifted, talented and creative learners; instructional models and practices; legislations and policy guidelines; and current issues in the field. This course has been designed to include: lecture, small & large group discussion, student presentations, expert presentations, and various types of “observations” of gifted learners and learning environments. Previous SPED 512.

SPED 5140. Instructional Strategies for Gifted Education (3); Sp
This course has been designed as a one semester introduction to learn instructional strategies, methods, and techniques of teaching the gifted student, which are explored. Opportunities are provided for development of strategies based on principles of curricular differentiation for gifted students. Prerequisite: SPED 5120. Previous SPED 514.

SPED 5160. Instructional Planning and Curriculum for Gifted Education (3); Fa
This course explores how appropriate curricula for the gifted is a response to the cognitive and affective needs which may be unique to gifted learners as well as those they share with their peers. Participants will examine modifications in the content, process, product, affect, and learning environment of classroom and curricula as they relate to gifted learners. They will gain experience in developing concept-based, open-ended, flexibly paced curriculum that can be implemented in the classroom immediately. Prerequisite or corequisite: SPED 5120. Previous SPED 516. 

SPED 5180. Twice Exceptional & Gifted Student (3); Su
The focus of this course is to introduce participants to gifted students with disabilities, also known as Twice Exceptional or 2X students. The course will describe research-based characteristics, identification and programming options and will assist students, as per the mission statements, to recognize and nurture outstanding potential so that gifted students with disabilities may become all that they are capable of. Previous SPED 518.

SPED 5200. Curriculum & Methods for Students with Severe Exceptionalities (3); Sp
This course is an examination of curriculum content, instruction methods, and individualized education programs appropriate for students with severe cognitive or behavioral exceptionalities whose education focuses on both the functional curriculum and the general education curriculum. Previous SPED 520.

SPED 5220. Learning Environments and Social Interactions for Gifted Education (3); Var
This course has been designed as a one semester introduction to learn and explore about the learning environments and social interactions of teaching gifted students. Opportunities are provided for development of strategies based on principles and best practices for gifted students. Previous SPED 522.

SPED 5240. Working with Families of Children with Exceptionalities and Giftedness (3); Var
This course is an examination of the philosophical foundations and collaborative strategies for teachers and other professionals working with families of children with exceptionalities, including special education needs, giftedness in the P-12 experience. Previous SPED 524.

SPED 5280. Assessment Issues for Gifted Education (3); Var
This course explores the Examine instruments, techniques, and strategies in the assessment, placement, and evaluation of ELL, Gifted, Exceptional and General learners in P-12 education. This course is designed to provide knowledge and skill regarding assessment procedures, process (including pre-referral and Response to Intervention), and protocols utilized in making eligibility and instructional decisions regarding individualized education programs and placements. In additions, candidates develop an understanding of assessment terminology, accommodations, and fidelity of implementation, as well as culturally appropriate assessments, and gain expertise in communicating assessment results to key stakeholders including student and families. Prerequisite: Field experience. Previous SPED 528.

SPED 5300. Reading Instruction in Special Education (3); Fa
This course is the study and application of reading instructional strategies for students in special education focusing on research-based corrective strategies used across content areas to support students in both the general education curriculum and functional curriculum. Previous SPED 530.

SPED 5340. Practicum in Special Education (1–4 VC); Fa, Sp
Supervised work in a special education program setting. Previous SPED 534.

SPED 5350 – 6350. Selected Topic in Special Education (1–4 VC); Fa, Sp
Course in topic or topics in special education. May be repeated with change of content. Previous SPED 535-635.

SPED 5400. Universal Design for Learning (3); Fa, Sp
This course provides an overview of Universal Design for Learning. In this course students will apply the principles of UDL for teaching and learning special education settings, examine the four highly interrelated components of a UDL curriculum, and identify educational tools available to create accessible barrier-free learning environments for diverse student populations. Previous SPED 540.

SPED 5500-6500. Seminar in Special Education (3); Sp
A seminar course in topic or topics in special education. Previous SPED 550-650.

SPED 5550. Classroom Management in Special Education (3); Fa, Sp
This course is an examination of behavior management techniques, reward systems, fading and intermittent reinforcement schedules used with students who exhibit more sever behavior exceptionalities. School-wide, classroom and individual student behavior intervention plans will be reviewed with emphasis on behavior manifestation determination and other IDEA mandates for addressing students’ behavioral needs. Previous SPED 555.

SPED 5820. Young Children Diverse Abilities (3); Su
This course develops an awareness in educators concerning an understanding of children with or without special needs. Cross-listed as: ECME 5820. Previous SPED 582.

SPED 5900–6900. Independent Study (1–4 VC); Fa, Sp
Individual, directed study arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

SPED 6110. Action Research in Education (3); Var
Action Research is a graduate-level class addressing both educational research and school improvement. The aims of Action Research include the development of the school leaders’ knowledge and skills in applied research techniques and developing action research for implementation in classrooms and schools, and preparing school leaders for informed analysis and evaluation of research. Previous SPED 611.

SPED 6120. The Special Education Program (3); Fa
A study of special education with emphasis on exceptionality and types of program intervention. Previous SPED 612.

SPED 6340. Practicum in Special Education (1 – 8 VC); Var
Supervised work in a special education program setting, with program options made available to the course participants. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous SPED 634.

SPED 6720. Counseling Parents of Exceptional Children (3); Var
This course is a study of problems associated with exceptionality and counseling approaches used with parents with an emphasis on resources available to parents. Previous SPED 672.

SPED 6730. Medical Aspects of Disability (3); Sp
This course is an overview of human disability and medical terminology. It provides a review of human body systems, major disabling conditions and their implications for rehabilitation counseling. Previous SPED 673.

SPED 6740. Psychocultural/Psychosocial Aspects of Disability (3); Sp
This course provides an overview of psychosocial and psychocultural aspects of disability emphasizing emotional issues influencing the adjustment process of persons with disabilities. Previous SPED 674.

SPED 6750. Organization and Administration of Special Education (3); Fa
This course is a study of the organization and administration of special education services at the federal, state, and local level with an emphasis on New Mexico state guidelines for special education. Previous SPED 675.

SPED 6970. Field Project (1–6 VC); Fa, Sp
Individual field research and writing in preparation of a graduate field project (equivalent to a thesis). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous SPED 697. 

SPED 6990. Thesis (1–6 VC); Fa, Sp
Individual research and writing in preparation of a graduate thesis. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Previous SPED 699.

Graduate Faculty

Lauren Addario.  M.A., B.F.A., New Mexico Highlands University.  Instructor of Media Arts and Technology.

Rebecca Alvarez.  Ph.D., M. A., B. S., University of California, Riverside.  Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice Studies/Sociology.

Heath Anderson.  M.B.A., New Mexico Highlands University; B.S., University of Georgia.  Instructor of Business.

Nariman Arfai.  Ph.D., M. S., University of New Mexico; B. A. University of California, Los Angeles. Instructor of Psychology.

Ali Arshad.  Ph.D., University of Connecticut; M.A., Atlanta University; B.A., University of Karachi. Associate Professor of Business.

Jacob Avery. Ph.D., M.A., University of Pennsylvania; B.A., Texas Lutheran University.

Edwin Aybar.  D.M.A., North Dakota State University; M.A., University of South Dakota; B.A., Wheaton College Conservatory of Music.  Instructor of Music, Piano/History.

Jeannette Baca.  D.S.W., University of St Thomas; M.S.W., B.S.W., New Mexico Highlands University.  Instructor of Social Work.

Morgan Barnard.  M.P.S. New York University Tisch School of the Arts; B.F.A., California College of the Arts.  Associate Professor of Media Arts and Technology.

Kevin Barnas.  M.S.W., Arizona State University; M.B.A., University of New Mexico; M.A., Seton Hall University; B.A. Rutgers University.  Instructor of Social Work.

Judith Barnstone.  Ph.D., University of Maryland; M.S.W., University of Washington; B.A., Cornell University.  Associate Professor of Social Work.

Robin Bartee.  M.S.W., New Mexico Highlands University; B.A., Western Kentucky University.  Instructor of Social Work.

Ben Bencomo.  D.S.W, University of St. Thomas. M.S.W., B.A., New Mexico Highlands University.  Instructor of Social Work.

Muhammad Bhutta.   M.S., New Mexico Highlands University; M.B.A., DeVry University; B.E.E., Dawood University of Engineering and Technology, Karachi.  Instructor of Computer Science.

James Biggs.  Ph.D., M.S., B.S., New Mexico State University.  Instructor of Forestry.

Helen Blythe.  Ph.D., Stanford University; M.A., B.A., Auckland University.  Professor of English.

Kristin Bogda.  Ph.D., University of Oklahoma; M.S., University of Central Oklahoma; B.S., University of Central Missouri.  Assistant Professor of Health.

Lewis Borck.  Ph.D., M.A, University of Arizona; B.A., University of New Mexico.  Assistant Professor of Archaeology/Physical Anthropology.

Peter Buchanan.  Ph.D., University of Toronto; M.A., University of Toronto; B.A., University of Kansas.  Assistant Professor of English.

Melani Buchanan-Farmer.  Ph.D., California Institute of Integral Studies, San Francisco; M.A., University of New Mexico.  Assistant Professor of Teacher Education.

Martin Castaneda.  M.F.A, Vermont College of fine Arts; B.A., Universidad de Lima, Perú.  Visiting Professor of Media Arts.

Blanca Cespedes.  Ph.D., M. Sc. University of Castilla La Mancha, Toledo, Spain; M. Sc. University Complutense of Madrid, Madrid, Spain.  Assistant Professor of Forestry.

Daniel Chadborn.  Ph.D., Texas A & M University, Commerce; M.A., Southeastern Louisiana University; B.S., University of New Orleans.  Assistant Professor of Psychology.

Todd Christensen.  M.F.A., University of Arizona; B.S., Southern Utah University.  Professor of Art.

Kip Coggins.  Ph.D., University of Michigan; M.S.W., B.A., Michigan State University.  Professor of Social Work.

Sarah Corey-Rivas.  Ph.D., B.S., Ohio State University.  Associate Professor of Biology.

Erika Derkas.  M.A., University of New Mexico; B.A., Humboldt State University.  Professor of Sociology.

Kevin Ensor.  Ph.D., University of Maryland at College Park. M. Ed., Loyola College Baltimore. Assistant Professor of School Counseling.

Donald Evans.  M.A., University of Arizona; B.A., Southern Illinois University.  Instructor of Speech and Theater.

Lauren Fath.  Ph.D., M.A., University of Missouri; M.F.A., Oregon State University; B.S., Northwestern University.  Assistant Professor of English.

Jeanie Flood.  Ph.D., University of Hawaii; M.S.N., University of Phoenix; B.S.N., California State University.  Associate Professor of Nursing and Director of the Nursing Program.

Donald “Rick” Froyd, Jr.  Ph.D., Walden University; M.A., National University; B.S., A.S., University of the State of New York, Regents College.  Associate Professor of Counseling.

Gloria Gadsden.  Ph.D., M.A., University of Pennsylvania; A.B., Columbia University.  Associate Professor of Criminal Justice.

Gil Gallegos.  Ph.D., M.S., B.S., New Mexico State University.  Associate Professor of Engineering and Computer Science.

Juan Gallegos.  Ph.D., University of Arizona; M.A., New Mexico Highlands University; M.A., B.A., New Mexico State University.  Assistant Professor of English.

Justine Garcia.  Ph.D., Emory University; B.S., B.A., University of New Mexico.  Assistant Professor of Biology.

Andre Garcia-Nuthmann.  Ph.D., University of Arizona; M.M., University of New Mexico; B.M., Southwestern University.  Professor of Music.

Sandra Gardner.  Ed. D., University of Missouri-St. Louis; M.S.N., Arizona State University; M.A., B.S.N., New Mexico State University.  Associate Professor of Nursing.

Geri Glover.  Ph.D., University of North Texas, Denton; M.A., Appalachian State University; B.S., University of New Mexico; B.A., St. John’s College.  Associate Professor of Counseling.

Elias Gonzales.   M.A., B.A., New Mexico Highlands University.  Instructor of Media Arts/Videography.

Mario Gonzales.  Ph.D., Washington State University; M.A., New Mexico Highlands University; B.A., California State University.  Assistant Professor of Anthropology.

Eric Griffin.  Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; B.S., Berry College.  Assistant Professor of Biology.

Shipra Gupta.  Ph.D., University of Miami, Coral Gables; M.S., Indian Institute of Technology, Guwahati, India; B.S., Isabella Thoburn College, Lucknow University, India.

Maria Haase.  Ed. D., Texas A & M University; M.A., B.S., Eastern New Mexico University.  Assistant Professor of Teacher Education (Bilingual/TESOL).

Edward Harrington.  Ph.D., University of Phoenix; M.A., Bowling Green State University; B.A., Heidelberg College.  Associate Professor of Music Education and Technology.

Mariah Fox Hausman.  M.F.A., B.F.A., University of Miami.  Associate Professor of Media Arts.

William Hayward.  Ph.D., University of New Mexico; M.S., Loughborough University, England; B.A., Carnegie College, England.  Associate Professor of Exercise and Sports Sciences.

Laura Heflin.  Ph.D., M.A., University of Southern California; B.S., Florida State University.  Associate Professor of Clinical Psychology.

Beatrice Hurtado.  M.S.N., B.S.N., University of New Mexico.  Instructor of Nursing.

Karol Ibarra Zetter.  Ph.D., University of New Mexico; M.A., M.A., University of New Mexico; B.A., ITESO, Universidad Jesuita de Guadalajara, México.  Assistant Professor of Spanish Linguistics.

Fabio Iwashita.   Ph.D., Campinas University/UNICAMP, Brazil; M.S., National Institute of Space Research/INPE; B.S., Biosciences Institute, Sao Paulo State University/UNESP, Brazil.  Assistant Professor of Forestry.

William Jaremko-Wright.  M.S., B.S., New Mexico Highlands University.  Instructor of Geology and Biology.

Sheree Jederberg.  Ed.D., M.A., M.A./B.A., University of Southern California; B.S., University of California, San Diego.  Associate Professor of Educational Leadership.

John J. Jeffries.  Ph.D., M.A., University of California, San Diego; B.A., University of California, Los Angeles.  Associate Professor of Mathematics.

Miwako Jeffries.  MACCT, University of New Mexico; B.A., University of California, San Diego; A.S., San Diego Mesa College. Instructor of Mathematics.

Kathy Jenkins.  Ph.D., M.S., B.A., University of New Mexico.  Professor of Exercise Physiology.

Jessica Johnsen.   M.S., New Mexico Highlands University; B.A., New Mexico State University.  Instructor of Computer Science.

Robert Karaba.  Ph.D., B.S., Miami University of Ohio; M.A., Colorado State University.  Associate Professor of Educational Leadership.

Siri Khalsa.  B.S.N., M.S.N., University of New Mexico.  Instructor of Nursing.

Mijoo Kim.  Ph.D., Ohio State University; M.S., Azusa Pacific University; M.S B.A., Kongju National University.  Assistant Professor of Physical Education.

Taik Kim.  Ph.D., M.S., University of Cincinnati; M.S., B.S., SungkyunKwan University, Korea. Associate Professor of Mathematics Education and Mathematics.

Yongseek Kim.  Ph.D., M.B.A., University of New Mexico; Master of Health and Sport Science, University of Tsukuba; B.A., Kyung-Hee University.  Associate Professor of Sports Administration.

Anna Koch.  Ph.D., University of Iowa, Iowa City; M.S., University of Nebraska-Kearney; B.A., University of Nebraska-Lincoln.  Assistant Professor of Rehabilitation Counseling.

Archadius Krivoshein.  Ph.D., Shemyakin-Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Moscow, Russia; M.Sc., B.Sc., Kuban State University, Krasnodar, Russia.  Assistant Professor of Chemistry.

Miriam Langer.  M.F.A., Tisch School of Fine Arts, New York University; B.F.A., B.A, Cornell University.  Professor of Media Arts.

Jay Lee.  Ph.D., M.Ed., B.S., University of Houston.  Associate Professor of Exercise Science/Kinesiology/Motor Behavior.

Jonathan Lee.  M.A., New Mexico Highlands University; B.A., University of North Texas.  Instructor of Software Systems Design.

Carol Linder.  Ph.D., M.A., University of Texas, Austin; B.S., University of New Mexico.  Visiting Associate Professor of Biology.

Peter Linder.  Ph.D., University of Texas, Austin; M.A., University of New Mexico; B.A., University of New Mexico.  Professor of History and Political Science.

Jennifer Lindline.  Ph.D., M.A., Bryn Mawr College; B.S., Temple University.  Professor of Geology.

Carol Litherland.  M.A., New Mexico Highlands University; B.S., University of New Mexico. Instructor of American Sign Language.

David M. Lobdell.  M.F.A., University of Notre Dame; B.F.A., University of Southwestern Louisiana. Professor of Art.

Shereen Lobdell.  M.A., B.F.A., University of New Mexico.  Instructor of Art.

Emet Ma’ayan.  M.A., New Mexico Highlands University; M.A., Brandeis University; B.A., State University of New York.  Instructor of Social Work.

Douglas Main.  Ph.D., University of Arkansas; M.S., Fort Hays State University; M.R.E., Nazarene Theological Seminary; B.A., Mid-America Nazarene College.  Professor of Rehabilitation Counseling.

Carlos Martinez.  M.S., University of New Mexico; B.S., New Mexico Highlands University. Instructor of Mathematics.

Lorraine Martinez.  M.A.(2), B.A., New Mexico Highlands University.  Instructor of Early Childhood Education.

Rey Martinez.  Ph.D., Florida State University; M.S.W., Boston University; B.A., University of Hawaii.  Professor of Social Work.

Elizabeth Massaro.  Ed. D., Creighton University, Omaha, NE; M.S.W., New Mexico Highlands University; B.A., Vermont College, Montpelier, VT; A.S., Massachusetts Bay Community College.  Associate Professor of Social Work.

Amanda May.  Ph.D., Florida State University; M.A., Central Michigan University; B.A., Lourdes University.  Assistant Professor of English/Director of the Writing Center.

Shirley Meckes. Ph.D., Salve Regina University; M.Ed., B.A., Rhode Island College.  Associate Professor of Early Childhood/Elementary Education.

Sebastian Medina.  Ph.D., The University of New Mexico; M.S., B.S., New Mexico Highlands University.  Assistant Professor of Biology.

Angela Meron.  MFA-V, Vermont College of Fine Arts; B.A., Grand View College.  Assistant Professor of Media Arts.

Amy Messex.  M.S.W., University of Michigan School of Social Work; B.A., University of Michigan. Instructor of Social Work.

Rebecca Moore. Ph.D. Cornell University; M.S.W., B.S., University of Utah.  Professor of Social Work.

Ben Nelson.  D.V.M., B.A., Texas A&M University.  Instructor of Biology.

Emmanuel Nkwenti-Zamcho.  D.B.A., US International University, San Diego; M.B.A., University of South Dakota.  Associate Professor of International Business.

Sara L. Olivares.  A.B.D, B.A., Western Michigan University; MFA, Texas State University. Assistant Professor of English/Creative Writing Poetry.

Daniel Olufemi.  Ph.D., University of New Mexico; M.A., Long Island University, Brooklyn; M.S., Adelphi University, Garden City, New York; B.A., Olabisi Onabanjo University, Nigeria. Assistant Professor of Literacy.

Dolores Ortega.  Ph.D., Claremont Graduate University; M.S.W., B.S.W., B.A., New Mexico Highlands University.  Associate Professor of Social Work.

David Pan.  Ph.D., M.A., University of Southern California; B.A., Stanford University.  Associate Professor of Psychology.

Seonsook Park.  Ph.D., M.A., University of New Mexico; B.A., Mokpo National University.  Associate Professor of Education.

Sulema Perales.  A.B.D., University of Texas, Rio Grande Valley; M.S., B.S., California State University, Fresno.  Assistant Professor of Counseling.

James Peters.  Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; M.B.A., B.S., Washington State University.  Instructor of Accounting.

Michael Petronis.  Ph.D., M.S., University of New Mexico; B.S., Kent State University.  Professor of Geology.

Melissa Phillips.  Ph.D., Walden University; M.A., College of Notre Dame; B.A., Towson State University.  Assistant Professor of Special Education.

Chris Ridgway.  Ph.D., Michigan State University; M.S.W., University of Arkansas; B.S., United States Military Academy, West Point.  Assistant Professor of Social Work.

Luke Ritter.   Ph.D., M.A., Saint Louis University.  Assistant Professor of American History.

Jesus Rivas.  Ph.D., University of Tennessee; Licenciatura in Biology, Universidad Central de Venezuela.  Professor of Biology.

Raeann Rivera.  M.S.W., University of California, Berkeley; B.A., University of California, San Diego.  Instructor of Social Work

Rodney Rock.  Ed. D., M.A., Central Michigan University; B. A., Aquinas College.  Associate Professor of Educational Leadership.

Elaine Rodriquez.  Ph.D., Northern Arizona University; M.A., New Mexico Highlands University; B.A., Mesa State College.  Associate Professor of Political Science.

Carla Romero. M.B.A., B.A., New Mexico Highlands University.  Instructor of Business.

Eric Romero. Ph.D., University of Arizona; M.A., Escuela Nacional de Antropología E Historia, México City; B.A., University of Colorado Boulder. ¬¬¬¬¬¬¬¬ Instructor of Native American/Hispano Studies.

Maureen Romine. Ph.D., M.S., B.S., Colorado State University.  Professor of Biology.

Monica Rossetti.  M.A., B.A., New Mexico Highlands University.  Instructor of Sociology.

Lori Rudolph.  Ph.D., M.A., University of New Mexico; B.S.W., University of Wisconsin.  Associate Professor Counseling and Guidance.

Joseph Sabutis.  Ph.D., M.S., University of Pittsburgh; M.S., University of California, Los Angeles; B.A., University of Nebraska, Omaha.  Professor of Physics.

David Sammeth.  B.S., Ph.D., Montana State University.  Professor of Chemistry.

Rod Sanchez.  Ph.D., Indiana University/Walden Institute; B.S., University of New Mexico.  Instructor of Management and Entrepreneurship.

Sarah Santillanes.  Ph.D., M.A., B.S., University of New Mexico.  Assistant Professor of Teacher Education.

Paul P.J. Sedillo.  Ph.D., M.A., University of New Mexico; B.A., New Mexico Highlands University.  Associate Professor of Special Education.

Jan Shepherd.  Ph.D., Duke University; B.A., Pfeifer College.  Instructor of Chemistry.

Naveen Singh.  Ph.D., New Mexico State University; M.S., B.S., Acharya Nagarjuna University, Guntar, AP, India.  Assistant Professor of Chemistry.

Joshua Sloan.  Ph.D., B.S., Purdue University.  Assistant Professor of Forestry.

Mathias Stricherz.  Ed.D., Texas Tech University; M.Ed., University of Guam; B.A., Huron College.  Instructor of Clinical Psychology.

Charles Swim.  D.B.A., United States International University; M.B.A., University of Nevada, Las Vegas; M.S., B.A., Eastern Montana College.  Instructor of Management.

Janis Taback-Keene.  Ed. S., M.S., University of New Mexico; B.A., Queens College.  Instructor of Education and Field Services Coordinator.

Eduardo Tafoya.  Ph.D., Binghamton University; M.A., B.A., University of New Mexico.  Professor of English.

Orit Tamir.  Ph.D., M.A., Arizona State University; B.A., University of Haifa, Israel.  Professor of Anthropology.

Tatiana Timofeeva.   Ph.D., Institute of Organoelement Compounds, Russian Academy of Science; M.S., B.S., Moscow State University.  Professor of Chemistry.

John Tourangeau.  Ph.D., Benedictine University; M.B.A., University of Phoenix; M.S.W., New Mexico Highlands University; B.A., St. Norbert College.  Instructor of Social Work.

Sara Tracy.  Ph.D., New Mexico State University; M.A., Pepperdine University; B.S., James Madison University.  Instructor of Psychology.

Rianne Trujillo.  M.A., B.F.A., New Mexico Highlands University.  Instructor of Media Arts and Technology.

Julie Tsatsaros.  Ph.D., James Cook University, Australia; M. Sc., Michigan State; B.E.S., University of Waterloo, Canada.  Instructor of Forestry.

Joanna Tsyitee.  M.S., B.A., New Mexico Highlands University; M.S., University of Edinburg, Scotland; A.A., Luna Community College.  Instructor of Psychology.

Kent Tucker.  D.B.A., M.B.A., United States International University; B.A., California State University, Fullerton.  Associate Professor of Finance.

Gregg Turner.  Ph.D., M.A., Claremont Graduate School; B.A., California State University.  Instructor of Mathematics.

Mariana Ulibarri-Horan.  Ph.D., M.A., Texas Tech University; M.A., New Mexico Highlands University; B.A., Colorado State University.  Assistant Professor of Special Education.

Elisabeth Valenzuela.  Ph.D., M.A., B.A., University of New Mexico.  Assistant Professor of Teacher Education (Bilingual Ed/TESOL).

Norma Valenzuela.  Ph.D., M.A., Arizona State University; B.A., University of New Mexico. Assistant Professor of Spanish.

 

Chia Vang.  A.B.D., University of Texas, Rio Grande Valley; M.S., B.S. University of California, Fresno.  Assistant Professor of Counseling.

Benjamin Vickers.  A.B.D., M.S., B.A., Texas State University, San Marcos.  Assistant Professor of Health Promotion.

Donna Vigil.  M.B.A., B.A., New Mexico Highlands University.  Instructor of Accounting.

Benjamin Villarreal.  Ed. D., Columbia University; M.A., New Mexico Highlands University; B.A., University of Memphis.  Assistant Professor of English.

Kallie Wilbourn.  M.A., New Mexico Highlands University; B.L.S., University of Iowa.  Visiting Assistant Professor of Anthropology

Steven Williams.  Ph.D., Northwestern University; B.A., Rutgers College.  Professor of History.

Madeleine Wilson.  M.S.W., New Mexico Highlands University; B.A., University of New Mexico.  Instructor of Social Work.

Ann Wolf.  Ed. D., University of Northern Colorado; M.S., Syracuse University; B.A., Rutgers University.  Assistant Professor of Reading Education.

Donna Woodford-Gormley.  Ph.D., M.A., Washington University; B.A., California State University.  Professor of English.

Donald Woodlee.  B.A., New Mexico Highlands University.  Instructor of Mathematics.

Joseph Zebrowski.  M.S., B.A., Texas A&M University.  Instructor of Forestry and Director of the GAINS Laboratory.

Melanie Zollner.  Ph.D., University of N Mexico; M.B.A., B.B.A., New Mexico Highlands University.  Assistant Professor of Management.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Faculty Emeriti

James Abreu. B.A., M.A., New Mexico Highlands University, Ph.D., University of New Mexico. Professor Emeritus of Education.

John Adams. B.A., Bethany College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Kansas. Professor Emeritus of English.

Ursel Albers. CPA/CMA, B.A. Hunter College; M.A., Michigan State University, Professor Emeritus of Accounting.

Robert L. S. Amai. B.A., M.S., University of Hawaii; Ph.D., University of Kansas. Professor Emeritus of Chemistry.

Frank Angel. Past President of the University. (deceased)

John Aragon. Past President of the University. (deceased)

Gilbert M. Baca. B.A., M.S.W., Loyola University of Chicago; Ph.D., University of Denver. Professor Emeritus of Social Work.

Jill Baker. B.A. University of Texas, Austin; MSW, University of Hawaii, Manoa; Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University, 2003.

John Barrett. B.A., M.A. Teachers College, Columbia University; Ph.D., University of New Mexico. Professor Emeritus of Education.

James A. Beatson. (deceased) Waldemere Bejnar. B.S., M.A., University of Michigan; Ph.D., University of Arizona. Professor Emeritus of Earth Science.

Ralph Bowyer. B.A., M.A., University of New Mexico; Associate Professor Emeritus of Physical Education. Walter F. Brunet. (deceased)

Carlton H. Cann. B.S., University of North Carolina; M.B.A., New Mexico Highlands University; Ph.D., University of Colorado. Professor Emeritus of Psychology.

Luis Casaus. B.A., New Mexico Highlands University; M.A., University of New Mexico; Ed.D., Texas Tech University. Professor Emeritus of Education.

Thomas Cheavens. Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin, Emeritus Professor of Chemistry.

Samuel Cheng. B.A., University of China; M.S., Kansas State University, Manhattan; Ed.D., University of Northern Colorado. Associate Professor Emeritus of Business.

John Clark. B.A., Earlham College; M.S., Ph.D., Purdue University. Professor Emeritus of Psychology. Ronald Clark. Ph.D., University of California at Riverside, Emeritus Professor of Chemistry.

Geraldo Coca. B.A., M.A., New Mexico Highlands University; Ph.D., University of New Mexico. Associate Professor Emeritus of Education.

James E. Connor. (deceased)

Jose E. Cordova. B.A., M.A., New Mexico Highlands University; Ph.D., University of New Mexico. Professor Emeritus of Education.

John A. Donnelly. (deceased)

Ray Farmer. (deceased) Wilma Fitch. B.S., M.S., Iowa State University. Associate Professor Emeritus of Education.

Anthony F. Gallegos. B.S., New Mexico Highlands University; M.P.H., University of Oklahoma; Ph. D., Colorado State University. Professor Emeritus of Environmental Science-Health and Biology.

Jose-Pablo Garcia. (deceased)

Lillian H. Gleason. (deceased)

Grady Greene. B.S.E., University of Arkansas; M.S., Kansas State University; Ed.D., University of Northern Colorado. Professor Emeritus of Music.

Donald G. Guerin. (deceased).

Albert Gutierrez. B.A., M.A., New Mexico Highlands University. Assistant Professor Emeritus of Business. Calvin Hager. B.A., University of Washington; M.Ed., Ed.D., University of Nebraska. Professor Emeritus of Education.

Sara Hanna. B.A., Indiana University; M. Phil., Yale University; Ph.D. Indiana University. Professor Emeritus of English.

Julius Harrington. B.A., LeMoyne-Owens College; M.A., University of Chicago; M.P.A., D.S.W., University of Utah. Professor of Social Work.

Sara Harris. B.A., M.A., New Mexico Highlands University; Ph.D., University of New Mexico. Professor Emeritus of Languages.

Dorothy Hauschulz. B.A., New Mexico Highlands University. M.S.; University of Utah; Ed. D., University of New Mexico. Professor Emeritus of Mass Communications.

Jean Hill. B.A., Douglass College, M.A., Rutgers University, Ph.D., DePaul University Professor Emeritus of Psychology.

Melvin Hill. (deceased)

Stanley J. Hipwood. (deceased)

Fred A. Hopper. (deceased)

Orval D. Hughes. B.A., Colgate University; M.S., Syracuse University; Ph.D., University of New Mexico. Associate Professor Emeritus of Education.

Evelyn I. Ivanoff. B.S., Northern State College of South Dakota; M.A. in L.S., George Peabody College. Professor Emeritus of Library Science.

Gerald Jacobi. B.S., M.S., Colorado State University; Ph.D., University of Utah. Professor Emeritus of Environmental Science.

Jean Lee Johnson. B.A., University of Western Ontario; M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina. Professor Emeritus of Modern Foreign Languages.

Bill L. Johnson. B.A., M.A., New Mexico Highlands University; Ed.D., University of New Mexico. Associate Professor Emeritus of Education.

John Spencer Johnson. (deceased)

Kim Kirkpatrick.  (deceased)

William H. Knell. (deceased)

Alvin Korte. B.A., New Mexico Highlands University; M.S.W., Arizona State University; Ph.D., University of Denver. Professor Emeritus of Social Work.

Merryl Kravitz. B.A., State University of New York; M.A., Ph.D., University of New Mexico. Professor of Secondary Education.

Harry M. Leippe. B.A., Calvin College; M.A., University of California at Berkeley. Professor Emeritus of Art. Robert G. Lindeborg. (deceased)

Vicente J. Llamas. B.S., M.S., University of Los Angeles; M.S., Ph.D., University of Missouri at Rolla. Professor Emeritus of Physics.

Anne Lohrli. B.A., M.A., Occidental College; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., University of Southern California. Professor Emeritus of English.

Roy Lujan. B.A., M.A., New Mexico Highlands University; Ph.D., University of New Mexico. Professor of History.

William Lux. B.A., University of New Mexico; M.A., Stanford University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Southern California. Professor Emeritus of History.

Ronald Maestas. B.A., M.A., Adams State College; Ed.D., Arizona State University. Professor Emeritus of Business.

Albert R. Maez. B.A., M.A., New Mexico Highlands University. Assistant Professor Emeritus of Engineering Technology.

Thomas Oliver Mallory. (deceased).

James H. Marshall. B.S., University of Kansas; M.A., New Mexico Highlands University. Associate Professor Emeritus of Human Performance, Leisure, and Sport. C.

Leo Martinez. B.A., M.A., Eastern New Mexico University; Ed.D., Utah State University. Associate Professor Emeritus of Industrial Arts Education.

Ruth Matilla. (deceased)

Elaine M. McDowell. B.S., University of New Mexico; M.S., Colorado State University. Professor Emeritus of Home Economics.

Merritt W. McGahan. (deceased)

Jack W. Mears. B.S., M.A., Ed.D., University of Texas at Austin. Professor Emeritus of Education.

Luis Medina. B.S., Adams State College; M.S.W., St. Louis University; D.S.W., University of Utah. Professor Emeritus of Social Work.

Alice Menzor. B.A., M.A., New Mexico Highlands University; Ph. D., University of New Mexico. Professor Emeritus of Education.

Robert E. Mishler. B.A., Manchester College; M.A., University of Colorado. Professor Emeritus of Anthropology.

Ira B. Mosley. B.S., M.S., Kansas State Teachers College; Ed.D., Stanford University. Professor Emeritus of Education.

Juanita Montoya. (deceased)

Opal Snitker Moore. (deceased)

Werner Muller. B.A., Haverford College; M.A., Ph.D., Teachers College, Columbia University. Professor Emeritus of Education.

Annelise Nanninga. (deceased)

Tito E. Narango. B.A., New Mexico Highlands University; M.S.W., University of Utah. Associate Emeritus Professor of Social Work.

Michael Olsen. B.A., St. Olaf College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Washington. Professor Emeritus of History. Alfonso Ortiz, Jr. B.A., M.A., New Mexico Highlands University; Ed.S., University of New Mexico. Associate Professor Emeritus of Education.

John M. Pacheco. B.A., M.S., New Mexico Highlands University; Ph.D., University of New Mexico. Past Vice President for Academic Affairs and Professor Emeritus of Education.

Bruce I. Papier. B.F.A., M.A., M.F.A., Ohio State University. Professor Emeritus of Graphic Design.

Seth H. Parsons. (deceased)

Lynn I. Perrigo. (deceased)

Edith Clement Rackley. (deceased)

Gabino Rendon. B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Colorado. Professor Emeritus of Sociology.

Barbara Risch. B.A., Thomas More College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Cincinnati. Professor of English. Gilbert D. Rivera. B.A., M.S., New Mexico Highlands University; Ph.D., University of North Texas. Past Vice President for Academic Affairs and Professor Emeritus of Mathematics.

James V. Rocca. B.B.A., Gonzaga University; Ph.D., University of Vienna. Professor Emeritus of Political Science.

Lillian Rogers. (deceased)

Louise L. Roloff. B.S., University of Colorado; M.A., New York University; Ph.D., State University of Iowa. Professor Emeritus of Health and Physical Education.

Patrick E. Romero. B.A., New Mexico Highlands University; M.A., Ball State University; Ed. D., Arizona State University. Professor Emeritus of Industrial Arts.

James D. Russell. B.A., M.A., New Mexico Highlands University; Ph.D., University of New Mexico. Associate Professor Emeritus of History.

Loretta Salazar. B.A., M.A.T.S, Ph.D. University of New Mexico. Professor Emeritus of Education.

Tomas Salazar. B.A., New Mexico Highlands University; M.A., University of Montana; Ph.D., University of New Mexico. Professor Emeritus of Mathematics/Education.

Lucille Sampson. B.A., M.A., New Mexico Highlands University; C.P.S. Associate Professor Emeritus of Business Administration.

Nicholas Sanchez. B.A., New Mexico Highlands University; M.A., Ph. D., University of New Mexico. Professor Emeritus of Secondary Education.

Willie Sanchez. B.A., M.A., New Mexico Highlands University; Ed.D., University of New Mexico. Professor Emeritus of Education.

Alice Sandoval. B.A., M.A., New Mexico Highlands University; Ph.D., University of New Mexico. Professor Emeritus of Education.

Elmer Schooley. (deceased)

Joseph A. Schufle. (deceased)

Charles J. Searcy. B.S., Panhandle A and M College; M.S., Ed.D., Oklahoma State University. Professor Emeritus of Mathematics.

Mary Shaw. Ph.D., M.S., University of California; B.A., Lone Mountain College, Associate Professor Emeritus of Biology.

Lora Mangum Shields. (deceased)

Joe M. Shockley. B.S., North Carolina State University; M.A., East Carolina University; Ed.D., University of Georgia. Professor of Human Performance, Leisure, and Sport.

Erma Schuster. (deceased)

Virginia Sloan. (deceased)

Albert L. Soderblom. (deceased)

John W. Spencer. B.S., M.S., Washington State University; Ph.D., University of Arizona. Professor Emeritus of Biology.

George H. Sprenger. B.S., Winona State College; M.S.T., University of North Dakota; Ph.D., University of Idaho. Professor Emeritus of Chemistry.

John Uribe. (deceased)

Art Trujillo. B.A., New Mexico Highlands University; M.A., University of Virginia; M.A., University of Missouri. Professor Emeritus of Journalism.

Delfino Trujillo. B.A., New Mexico Highlands University; M.S.W., Our Lady of the Lake University at San Antonio. Professor Emeritus of Social Work.

Alfonso Urtiaga. B.A., M.L., Universidad de Madrid; M.A., Facultad Filosofica de la Compania de Jesus, Madrid; M.C.L., Columbia University; Ph.D., Louisiana State University. Professor Emeritus of Languages. Facundo Valdez. (deceased)

Margaret Vasquez-Geffroy. B.A., M.A., University of New York; Ph.D., University of New Mexico. Professor Emeritus of Anthropology.

Bernice E. Waggoner. B.S., Abilene Christian College; M.S., University of Colorado; Ph.D., Texas Woman’s University. Professor Emeritus of Human Performance, Leisure, and Sport.

George Wang. B.A., Chun Hsing University; M.A., University of Idaho; M.S., University of Oklahoma. Professor Emeritus of Library Science.

Thomas Ward. Ph.D., M.S., Iowa State University; B.S., Northern Arizona University. Professor of Sociology.

Loren E. Wise. B.M.E., University of Evansville; M.M., D.M.A., University of Arizona. Professor Emeritus of Music.

Frederick L. Yarger. (deceased)

Roberta Henderson Zohn. B.A., M.A., New Mexico Highlands University. Assistant Professor Emeritus of Music.